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Halloween email game



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 1st 03, 04:57 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Posts: n/a
Default Halloween email game

Hello,

I read in Tim krabbé page a fantastic note about Halloween gambit (A
BREEZE IN THE SLEEPY 4-KNIGHT'S GAME). You can read it at:
http://www.xs4all.nl/%7Etimkr/tour/breeze.htm

After that, I tried to read all I can about Halloween, and then I wrote
some articles about it in Spanish little magazines.

Some time later, in Tim krabbé pages I read about an email tournament
about Halloween (entry 197) and I asked for participate.
http://www.xs4all.nl/%7Etimkr/chess2/diary_10.htm

In that email tournament participate too a Gm (Vadim Milov -2600 FIDE-)
and some other players (two IM, two FM, strong dutch players, ...)
(You can read about it in entry 208 of Tim Diary)
http://www.xs4all.nl/%7Etimkr/chess2/diary.htm

------------------------

Here I show my most interesting game in that tournament. It's a
computer-assisted game started in 20th January and finished today.

In some moments both players did not play the computer suggestions and
it's a very interesting and difficult game because the unbalanced material.

I post it here because it would be an interesting exercise to read first
some comments about it from other people (you?) and then I will post my
analysis and feelings about it and about the lines you propose.

(note: Mr GD comments are not wellcome)

[Event "Email Halloween"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2003.01.20"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Hoynck, Frans (NED)"]
[Black "Torrecillas, Antonio (SPA)"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C47"]
[WhiteElo ""]
[BlackElo ""]
[PlyCount "110"]
[EventDate "2003.01.20"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5 Nxe5 5. d4 Ng6 6. e5 Ng8 7. Bc4
c6 8. Qe2 Bb4 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qc4+ Kf8 11. Qxb4+ Qe7 12. Qxe7+ N8xe7
13. b3 Nf5 14.Ba3+ Kf7 15. O-O-O d5 16. exd6 Re8 17. g3 b6 18. f3 Bb7
19. Ne4 Ke6 20. c4 c5 21. Bxc5 Kd7 22. Rhe1 bxc5 23. Nxc5+ Kc6 24. d7
Rxe1 25. Rxe1 Nf8 26. b4 a5 27.d5+ Kc7 28. g4 Nd6 29. Re7 Rd8 30. Ne6+
Nxe6 31. dxe6 Nxc4 32. Rxg7 Nd6 33.Rxh7 Bxf3 34. b5 Bxg4 35. b6+ Kxb6
36. Rh6 Kc7 37. e7 Rxd7 38. Rxd6 Rxe7 39.Rd2 Re3 40. Kb2 Kb6 41. Rd6+
Kc5 42. Ra6 Kb5 43. Rg6 Be6 44. a3 Ka4 45. h4 Re2+ 46. Kc3 Kxa3 47. h5
Bb3 48. h6 Rh2 49. Kd4 Kb2 50. Ke5 a4 51. Kf6 a3 52. Kg7 a2 53. Ra6 Bc2
54. Rb6+ Ka3 55. Ra6+ Ba4 0-1

  #2  
Old July 4th 03, 12:14 PM
Tobi Usher
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Posts: n/a
Default Halloween email game


"Antonio Torrecillas" wrote
Nobody interested in posting here any analisis if this game?

:-(
AT

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5 Nxe5 5. d4 Ng6 6. e5 Ng8 7. Bc4
c6 8. Qe2 Bb4 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qc4+ Kf8 11. Qxb4+ Qe7 12. Qxe7+ N8xe7
13. b3 Nf5 14.Ba3+ Kf7 15. O-O-O d5 16. exd6 Re8 17. g3 b6 18. f3 Bb7
19. Ne4 Ke6 20. c4 c5 21. Bxc5 Kd7 22. Rhe1 bxc5 23. Nxc5+ Kc6 24. d7
Rxe1 25. Rxe1 Nf8 26. b4 a5 27.d5+ Kc7 28. g4 Nd6 29. Re7 Rd8 30. Ne6+
Nxe6 31. dxe6 Nxc4 32. Rxg7 Nd6 33.Rxh7 Bxf3 34. b5 Bxg4 35. b6+ Kxb6
36. Rh6 Kc7 37. e7 Rxd7 38. Rxd6 Rxe7 39.Rd2 Re3 40. Kb2 Kb6 41. Rd6+
Kc5 42. Ra6 Kb5 43. Rg6 Be6 44. a3 Ka4 45. h4 Re2+ 46. Kc3 Kxa3 47. h5
Bb3 48. h6 Rh2 49. Kd4 Kb2 50. Ke5 a4 51. Kf6 a3 52. Kg7 a2 53. Ra6 Bc2
54. Rb6+ Ka3 55. Ra6+ Ba4 0-1



Antonio,

Analysing this game seems a rather unrewarding task. It's hard to come up
with improvements. White offers an incorrect piece sacrifice and Black's
precise defensive play refutes it. End of story.
I've looked at Krabbé's article and I can understand his enthusiasm for this
curious line, since curiosities are Krabbé's speciality. I can also
understand an unprepared player losing against it in a blitz game. However,
objectively the gambit has to be incorrect. Your game illustrates that
nicely. If White has nothing better than 9.Bxf7+, exchanging his attacking
bishop and misplacing his queen, then his position seems pretty hopeless.
It would be more in style to play 9.0-0, followed by advancing the f-pawn,
but this plan also appears to fall short after 9.Bxc3 10.bxc3 N8e7 11.f4 0-0
12.f5 Nxf5! or 12.Bd3 d6.

Tobi


  #3  
Old July 4th 03, 04:21 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Posts: n/a
Default Halloween email game

En/na Andreas Walkenhorst ha escrit:
On Thu, 03 Jul 2003 23:30:17 +0200, Antonio Torrecillas
wrote:

Nobody interested in posting here any analisis if this game?



Hi Antonio,
maybe this is more or less valid for others too:
...interested, yes , but for me it is simple: I just don't feel
qualified. (In this case it is even worse than usually, playing this
Helloween things is like another game compared to the positions I like
:-))

Andreas


thanks

Computer aid is allowed, and it happens nothing if some comment is not
correct (or some reply to some comment). All players can comment in any
game all the ideas they have. When I'm looking a wch game or any "top"
game (for exemple in live internet) I'm dare and I propose the ideas I
see, some (or most of them) are wrong but from those comments I
understand better the games.

There are some interesting moments in taht game.

AT

  #4  
Old July 4th 03, 04:54 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Posts: n/a
Default Halloween email game

En/na Tobi Usher ha escrit:
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5 Nxe5 5. d4 Ng6 6. e5 Ng8 7. Bc4
c6 8. Qe2 Bb4 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qc4+ Kf8 11. Qxb4+ Qe7 12. Qxe7+ N8xe7
13. b3 Nf5 14.Ba3+ Kf7 15. O-O-O d5 16. exd6 Re8 17. g3 b6 18. f3 Bb7
19. Ne4 Ke6 20. c4 c5 21. Bxc5 Kd7 22. Rhe1 bxc5 23. Nxc5+ Kc6 24. d7
Rxe1 25. Rxe1 Nf8 26. b4 a5 27.d5+ Kc7 28. g4 Nd6 29. Re7 Rd8 30. Ne6+
Nxe6 31. dxe6 Nxc4 32. Rxg7 Nd6 33.Rxh7 Bxf3 34. b5 Bxg4 35. b6+ Kxb6
36. Rh6 Kc7 37. e7 Rxd7 38. Rxd6 Rxe7 39.Rd2 Re3 40. Kb2 Kb6 41. Rd6+
Kc5 42. Ra6 Kb5 43. Rg6 Be6 44. a3 Ka4 45. h4 Re2+ 46. Kc3 Kxa3 47. h5
Bb3 48. h6 Rh2 49. Kd4 Kb2 50. Ke5 a4 51. Kf6 a3 52. Kg7 a2 53. Ra6 Bc2
54. Rb6+ Ka3 55. Ra6+ Ba4 0-1


Antonio,

Analysing this game seems a rather unrewarding task. It's hard to come up
with improvements. White offers an incorrect piece sacrifice and Black's
precise defensive play refutes it. End of story.
I've looked at Krabbé's article and I can understand his enthusiasm for this
curious line, since curiosities are Krabbé's speciality. I can also
understand an unprepared player losing against it in a blitz game. However,
objectively the gambit has to be incorrect. Your game illustrates that
nicely. If White has nothing better than 9.Bxf7+, exchanging his attacking
bishop and misplacing his queen, then his position seems pretty hopeless.
It would be more in style to play 9.0-0, followed by advancing the f-pawn,
but this plan also appears to fall short after 9.Bxc3 10.bxc3 N8e7 11.f4 0-0
12.f5 Nxf5! or 12.Bd3 d6.

Tobi


Hello,

thank you for your message,

I agree this piece sacrifice is incorrect, but it's not easy to refute
it. In that tournament black had to play the most agressive lines to
take advantage, because we play 5 more games with white and in those
games we will not have easy life.

Playing risky with black has lead to some defeats in that tournament,
but playing not the best and critical lines has lead to some sad draws
for black.

About this game, I have played the same position (but with white) in
another game, and I played your 9.0-0.
Your line seems good for black but white can fight after 9.0-0 Bxc3
10.bxc3 N8e7 11.f4 0-0 12.Bd3 d6 13.f5 (black is better and can return
the piece and be a pawn up but he is not winning)
My other game followed 9.0-0 Bxc3 10.bxc3 Qe7! (menacing ...d5) and I
had some problems. (but I won!! being a rook down for some moves)

After 9.Bxf7 white has two pawns for the piece but when we were playing
those moves I thought I was won.

The problem is that white imaginative play lead him to a position where
I was forced to play for a draw. When I played 33...Bxf3 I was
considering offering draw because after 34.Rh3!! Bxg3 35.Rc3 Kb7 36.Rd3
Nf5 37.Rg3 black can not win.

I was very lucky because my opponent thought that the line we played was
draw (he considered that for me was preferable to play with knight+rook
but this ending really was draw) because I obtained rook+bishop and pawn
of the wrong corner. Curiously, a friend of my chessclub (a 2515 GM)
told me that position after 39th move was "dead draw", but he changed
his opinion when I show him my plan and the game continuation.

My provisorie conclusion is that 4.Nxe5 is the only piece sacrifice
"incorrect", the other sacrifice in that game was a fantastic exercise
of imagination from Mr Hoynck who could obtained draw being two pieces down!

AT

  #5  
Old July 4th 03, 10:21 PM
Claus-Jürgen Heigl
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Posts: n/a
Default Halloween email game

Antonio Torrecillas wrote:

Nobody interested in posting here any analisis if this game?

I read some articles about the Halloween Attack a year back or so.
While I found it surprising and entertaining I felt that White didn´t
have much if Black played 5...Ng6. So I didn´t look very deep into
it and I´m not feeling competent writing about the finer points of
the opening. And the main source of theory,
http://www.jakob.at/steffen/
appears to be gone, so I couldn´t even look things up.

For the rest, I´ll try my best, but I have to say that I´m a much
weaker player than Antonio and I´m relying heavily on computer
analysis.

En/na Antonio Torrecillas ha escrit:


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5


For those that do know nothing about this amazing sacrifice, yes
it´s probably as unsound as it looks. White gets a pawn for the
piece, a strong pawn center and an advantage of development for
the piece. But a piece is still a piece and there is nothing forcing
yet.

Nxe5 5. d4 Ng6 6. e5 Ng8 7. Bc4 c6


Main line of the theory, as I remember so far. Black retreated his
Ne5 to g6 where it can´t be kicked again. If it had retreated to c6,
White could have probably established a pawn on d6, cramping Black
very much. For example: 4...Nc6 5. d5 Ne5 (5...Nb8 is looking even
worse to me) 6. f4 Ng6 (now the knight is all the same on g6, but
did Black gain anything from jumping around? I think not.) 7. e5
Ng8 8. d6. If Black trades on d6, the e-file opens and the king is
open to attack. The loss of the right to castle is inevitable and
the black king will be stuck in the center. If Black doesn´t trade
he is cramped even more (no place for the queen) and White threatens
Nb5 anyhow.

7...c6 prepares d5. If Black gets through with it, the Bc4 is shut
out and any hope of attack is over. Of course White can trade pawns,
but then Black is free to develop his pieces. White has to do
something about d5 fast. 8. 0-0 d5 9. exd6 e.p. Bxd6 10. Re1+ N8e7
won´t cut
it.

8. Qe2


Now if 8...d5, White captures with check making things awkward for
Black. 9. exd6+. Putting a piece on e7 is just losing the piece,
obviously this is good for White. 9...Be6? 10. Bxe6 fxe6 11. Qxe6+
is even worse. 9...Kd7 keeps the piece, but gives White the position
he wants. Black´s king is in front of his pieces, open lines and
diagonals for White, a bid development advantage. I don´t know if
that is already enough for the piece, but here anything can happen.

8...Bb4


Black sacrifices another pawn to get some bresthing space and trade
the queens. Perhaps 8...b5 9. Bb3 Bb7 with the idea Qb6 and 0-0-0
is possible.

9. Bxf7+


Interesting was 9. 0-0 with the idea to storm the f-pawn. For
example 9...Bxc3 (if 9...b5 10. Bd3 with the same plan is probably
best. 10. Nxb5 cxb5 11. Bxf7+ Kxf7 12. Qf3+ and Qxa8 takes most
of the attacking possibilities out of the position and White gets
only a rook and 2 pawns for 3 pieces) 10. bxc3 N8e7 11. f4 0-0
12. Bd3 (not 12. f5 Nxf5 13. Rxf5 d5) 12...f5 13. exf6 Rxf6 14. f5
Nh8 15. Bg5 with attack.

19...Kxf7 10. Qc4+ Kf8


Black is following his plan, but 10...d5 was also possible. This
costs a pawn but activates the black pieces. Since Black has more
pieces than White he should look to activate them whenever he can.
A possible line is 11. exd6 Be6 12. Qxb4 Qb6 13. Qa3 (13. Qc5 Qxc5
14. dxc5 Bf5 the black pieces become active) 13...Nf6 (or 13...Qxd4!?
14. 0-0 Nf6 15. Be3 Qe5) 14. Be3 Nd5 15. 0-0-0 Qb4. The pawn d6 is
beginning to feel lonely.

11. Qxb4+ Qe7 12. Qxe7+ N8xe7 13. b3


The white counterplay is based on restricting the black pieces as
much as possible. White intends to blockade d6 with a piece.

Nf5 14.Ba3+ Kf7 15. O-O-O d5?


Sacrifices a pawn to develop the Bc8 but overlooks a white counter
(see later). The principal move and much better in my opinion was
15...Rd8. This prepares d5. If White wants to prevent d5 the only
practible move is 16. g4. 16. Ne4 doesn´t work because 16...Nf4
threatening Ne2+ and Nxg2 wins a pawn which White can´t afford to
lose. But after 16. g4 White has a lot weak dark squares. The black
knights then go on a rampage while the white dark-squared bishop is
far away.

For example 16. g4 Nfh4 17. h3 (if White doesn´t protect
g4 and seeks to control d6 instead with 17. Ne4 then 17...d5
unleashes a tornado of black light pieces: 18. Nd6+ Rxd6 19. Bxd6
(19. exd6 seeks counterplay on the e-file but isn´t any better.
19...Bxg4 20. Rd2 [20. Re1 Ng2 21. Reg1 Bf3 22. Kd2 Re8 23. Rc1 Re2+
24. Kc3 Ke6. White is totally helpless.] 20...Nf4 21. Re1 Re8
22. Re3 Nf3. Total domination.) 19...Bg4 20. f3 (20. Rd2 Nf3
21. Rdd1 Nf4 and White is helpless against Bh3 and Bg2.) 20...Bxf3
21. Rhf1 Ke6 22. Rd2 Nf4 23. Rdf2 (23. c4 g5. Black safeguards
the light pieces and plans Bg4, Nf3 and the activation of the rook.
White doesn´t have the slightest chance of counterplay.) 23...Ne2+
24. Kd2 Nxd4 25. c3 Nf5 26. Rxf3 Nxf3+ 27. Rxf3 Nxd6 28. exd6 Rd8!
wins.) 17...Nf4 18. Ne4 (White can try to attack the knights with
the bishop 18. Kb1 Nf3 19. Bc1 Ne6 20. Ne2 (or 20. Be3 d6 and the
center is cracked) c5 21. c3 b6. If the white d-pawn advances the
e-pawn will be lost.

16. exd6 Re8


If Black intended 16...Rd8 17. d5 would have kept the pawn.

17. g3


A fine move which restricts the black knights.

17...b6 18. f3


At first I thought this may be a mistake, because it loses control of
e3. But I`m not sure if Black can get anything out of it. He could
trade a rook with 18...Re3 19. Ne4 h6 20. Rhf1 Re2 21. Rf2. But I
can´t figure out if this is good or bad for Black. I tend to think
it´s better than not because otherwise White may double the rooks
on the e-file and pressure against e7.

19. Ne4 Ke6 20. c4 c5


Probably I don´t know what´s going on here. I would have preferred
doubling the rooks on the e-file first, then go looking for better
squares for my knights and maybe then doing something for real (Kd7,
Re6, Rae8). As Black I wouldn´t be afraid of White pushing the pawn
to c5. It would give me a great square for my knight (d5) rendering
the white bishop useless.

21. Bxc5


That came as a bit of surprise!

Kd7 22. Rhe1 bxc5 23. Nxc5+ Kc6 24. d7


The point of the white combination. Unfortunately I´m now lacking
the time to do more analysis. May be more in a few days.

Claus-Juergen
  #6  
Old July 5th 03, 12:50 AM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Posts: n/a
Default Halloween email game

Hello Claus-Jürgen,

thanks,
What a fantastic work!

Now it's a bit too late, I will answer as soon as possible.
For now, only some "express" comments:

- This email tournament is organized by Maurits Wind who maybe is the
best specialist in this line. I suppose Mr Wind will win the tournament.

- He wrote recently an article for the german magazine "kaisibber" in
colaboration with Buecker. He thinks that "existing theory" (Jacob's
page) can be improved in almost all lines. His 8.Qe2 recomendation is to
avoid 8.Qf3 d5! 9.ed6 Be6 which is clearly better for black.

- Mr Wind was one of the pionners of this line and He organized this
email tournament maybe trying to bring some light about if there exist a
refutation of this line. Do not forget that main theory was based in
Brause blitz games and some email games played by strong players seems
to be a more strong test.

- It seems to be incomplete the line you suggest about 15...Rd8
(16.g4 Nfh4 17.h3 Nf4 18.Ne4 ... it seems something missing after that)

Good night
Antonio T.

En/na Claus-Jürgen Heigl ha escrit:
I read some articles about the Halloween Attack a year back or so.
While I found it surprising and entertaining I felt that White didn´t
have much if Black played 5...Ng6. So I didn´t look very deep into
it and I´m not feeling competent writing about the finer points of
the opening. And the main source of theory,
http://www.jakob.at/steffen/
appears to be gone, so I couldn´t even look things up.

For the rest, I´ll try my best, but I have to say that I´m a much
weaker player than Antonio and I´m relying heavily on computer
analysis.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5
Nxe5 5. d4 Ng6 6. e5 Ng8 7. Bc4 c6
8. Qe2 Bb4 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qc4+ Kf8
11. Qxb4+ Qe7 12. Qxe7+ N8xe7 13. b3
Nf5 14.Ba3+ Kf7 15. O-O-O d5?


Sacrifices a pawn to develop the Bc8 but overlooks a white counter
(see later). The principal move and much better in my opinion was
15...Rd8. This prepares d5. If White wants to prevent d5 the only
practible move is 16. g4. 16. Ne4 doesn´t work because 16...Nf4
threatening Ne2+ and Nxg2 wins a pawn which White can´t afford to
lose. But after 16. g4 White has a lot weak dark squares. The black
knights then go on a rampage while the white dark-squared bishop is
far away.

For example 16. g4 Nfh4 17. h3 (if White doesn´t protect
g4 and seeks to control d6 instead with 17. Ne4 then 17...d5
unleashes a tornado of black light pieces: 18. Nd6+ Rxd6 19. Bxd6
(19. exd6 seeks counterplay on the e-file but isn´t any better.
19...Bxg4 20. Rd2 [20. Re1 Ng2 21. Reg1 Bf3 22. Kd2 Re8 23. Rc1 Re2+
24. Kc3 Ke6. White is totally helpless.] 20...Nf4 21. Re1 Re8
22. Re3 Nf3. Total domination.) 19...Bg4 20. f3 (20. Rd2 Nf3
21. Rdd1 Nf4 and White is helpless against Bh3 and Bg2.) 20...Bxf3
21. Rhf1 Ke6 22. Rd2 Nf4 23. Rdf2 (23. c4 g5. Black safeguards
the light pieces and plans Bg4, Nf3 and the activation of the rook.
White doesn´t have the slightest chance of counterplay.) 23...Ne2+
24. Kd2 Nxd4 25. c3 Nf5 26. Rxf3 Nxf3+ 27. Rxf3 Nxd6 28. exd6 Rd8!
wins.) 17...Nf4 18. Ne4 (White can try to attack the knights with
the bishop 18. Kb1 Nf3 19. Bc1 Ne6 20. Ne2 (or 20. Be3 d6 and the
center is cracked) c5 21. c3 b6. If the white d-pawn advances the
e-pawn will be lost.

16. exd6 Re8
17. g3
17...b6 18. f3
19. Ne4 Ke6 20. c4 c5
21. Bxc5
Kd7 22. Rhe1 bxc5 23. Nxc5+ Kc6 24. d7


The point of the white combination. Unfortunately I´m now lacking
the time to do more analysis. May be more in a few days.

Claus-Juergen


  #7  
Old July 6th 03, 12:38 AM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Posts: n/a
Default Halloween email game

Hello Tobi,

thanks for your messages too!
some comments belov ...

En/na Tobi Usher ha escrit:
"Antonio Torrecillas" wrote

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5 Nxe5 5. d4 Ng6 6. e5 Ng8 7. Bc4
c6 8. Qe2 Bb4 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qc4+ Kf8 11. Qxb4+ Qe7 12. Qxe7+ N8xe7
13. b3 Nf5 14.Ba3+ Kf7 15. O-O-O d5 16. exd6 Re8 17. g3 b6 18. f3 Bb7
19. Ne4 Ke6 20. c4 c5 21. Bxc5 Kd7 22. Rhe1 bxc5 23. Nxc5+ Kc6 24. d7
Rxe1 25. Rxe1 Nf8 26. b4 a5 27.d5+ Kc7 28. g4 Nd6 29. Re7 Rd8 30. Ne6+
Nxe6 31. dxe6 Nxc4 32. Rxg7 Nd6 33.Rxh7 Bxf3 34. b5 Bxg4 35. b6+ Kxb6
36. Rh6 Kc7 37. e7 Rxd7 38. Rxd6 Rxe7 39.Rd2 Re3 40. Kb2 Kb6 41. Rd6+
Kc5 42. Ra6 Kb5 43. Rg6 Be6 44. a3 Ka4 45. h4 Re2+ 46. Kc3 Kxa3 47. h5
Bb3 48. h6 Rh2 49. Kd4 Kb2 50. Ke5 a4 51. Kf6 a3 52. Kg7 a2 53. Ra6 Bc2
54. Rb6+ Ka3 55. Ra6+ Ba4 0-1

The problem is that white imaginative play lead him to a position where
I was forced to play for a draw. When I played 33...Bxf3 I was
considering offering draw because after 34.Rh3!! Bxg3 35.Rc3 Kb7 36.Rd3
Nf5 37.Rg3 black can not win.


In view of this variation, we will have to look for an improvement for Black
at an earlier stage. When I first saw the position after the queen exchange,
I believed Black had a clear advantage, but the longer I look at it, the
better I like White's compensation! So I went back to move 7. Why did you
choose 7...c6? Isn't this a bit slow? Krabbé says that the value of Euwe's
'refutation' 7...d5 is disputable. But is this true? Since in your 7...c6
line White gets two pawns anyway, why not give the second pawn immediately,
enabling the Bc8 to join the fight.
After 7...d5 8.Bxd5 I like the move 8...Nge7. Were any games played with
this line in your tournament?

Tobi


I think too that the ending we reached was not so easy to win, or at
least I did not find a clear way to win.

The rules of the tournament were "special" in the sense of each player
has to play a 5 different lines in his 5 games with black. We receive a
list of 20 lines and we have to choose 5 of them to play with black.

In another game I played 7...d5. It was versus the strongest OTB player
in the tournament (GM Milov), and we are still playing an ending where I
have a piece versus 2 pawns which is very difficult to win.
I have played too 7...Bb4 and 7...d6 and 5...Nc6 6.d5 Bb4.

About what is the best "refutation": some "local" players have the
intention of writing a book about the tournament and about the opening.
I have wrote some articles about them too. Once we know all the games of
the tournament we will have an great material to take some conclusions.

For now (from the games I have seen from the tournament) I think that
there are three very interesting lines which can be good for black, but
we need more test:
- 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nxe5 Nxe5 5.d4 Ng6! 6.e5 Ng8! 7.Bc4
Bb4!? 8.Qf3 f6 9.0-0 Bxc3 10.bxc3 d5
- 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nxe5 Nxe5 5.d4 Ng6! 6.e5 Ng8! 7.Bc4 c6!?
8.Qe2 (8.Qf3 d5 9.exd6 Be6) 8...Bb4 (I feel black has to be better here,
it's only question to search and find the good continuation)
- 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nxe5 Nxe5 5.d4 Ng6! 6.e5 Ng8! 7.Bc4 d6!?
8.Qf3 f5

There is a web page from one participant with some games of the
tournament updated some days ago:
http://www.strony.wp.pl/wp/d-artagna.../halloween.htm

Antonio Torrecillas

  #8  
Old July 6th 03, 03:16 AM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Hello Claus-Jürgen,

.... Some comments belov

Antonio T.

En/na Claus-Jürgen Heigl ha escrit:
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5


For those that do know nothing about this amazing sacrifice, yes
it´s probably as unsound as it looks. White gets a pawn for the
piece, a strong pawn center and an advantage of development for
the piece. But a piece is still a piece and there is nothing forcing
yet.


Black can equalize in many ways, can obtain positions with no risk of
losing and it seems that can obtain advantage in different ways, ... but
some complicated "refutations" are not so easy or clear!!

Nxe5 5. d4 Ng6 6. e5 Ng8 7. Bc4 c6


Main line of the theory, as I remember so far. Black retreated his
Ne5 to g6 where it can´t be kicked again. If it had retreated to c6,
White could have probably established a pawn on d6, cramping Black
very much. For example: 4...Nc6 5. d5 Ne5 (5...Nb8 is looking even
worse to me) 6. f4 Ng6 (now the knight is all the same on g6, but
did Black gain anything from jumping around? I think not.) 7. e5
Ng8 8. d6. If Black trades on d6, the e-file opens and the king is
open to attack. The loss of the right to castle is inevitable and
the black king will be stuck in the center. If Black doesn´t trade
he is cramped even more (no place for the queen) and White threatens
Nb5 anyhow.

7...c6 prepares d5. If Black gets through with it, the Bc4 is shut
out and any hope of attack is over. Of course White can trade pawns,
but then Black is free to develop his pieces. White has to do
something about d5 fast. 8. 0-0 d5 9. exd6 e.p. Bxd6 10. Re1+ N8e7
won´t cut
it.


Your comment about theory is very accurate, I only would add that
5...Nc6 6.d5 Bb4 7.dxc6 Nxe4! 8.Qd4 Qe7 seems to give clear advantage to
black, but after playing it in that tournament two times (one with each
color) it's not so clear for me ...

8. Qe2


Now if 8...d5, White captures with check making things awkward for
Black. 9. exd6+. Putting a piece on e7 is just losing the piece,
obviously this is good for White. 9...Be6? 10. Bxe6 fxe6 11. Qxe6+
is even worse. 9...Kd7 keeps the piece, but gives White the position
he wants. Black´s king is in front of his pieces, open lines and
diagonals for White, a bid development advantage. I don´t know if
that is already enough for the piece, but here anything can happen.


I completely agree

8...Bb4


Black sacrifices another pawn to get some bresthing space and trade
the queens. Perhaps 8...b5 9. Bb3 Bb7 with the idea Qb6 and 0-0-0
is possible.


I was happy obtaining the ending we reach, that mean I did not want not
avoid 8...Bb4 9.Bxf7. My decission was that black is better in the
ending after 8...Bb4 9.Bxf7 and I thought that white 0-0 lines would be
better for black without playing [...b5 Bb3] because the bishop in c4 is
exposed in some lines to ...d5 and weakening with ...b5 can help white
to open files with some a4.

I think that analysis is not enough to decide our move in the opening
phase. In that case, I trust my intuition, ... which can be wrong of course!

Your line with 0-0-0 seems interesting but not "safe enough" because
white obtain some atacking chances. As we have seen in some games of
this tournament, white can have attacking chances strong enough to win
if black do not solve his development and center.

9. Bxf7+


Interesting was 9. 0-0 with the idea to storm the f-pawn. For
example 9...Bxc3 (if 9...b5 10. Bd3 with the same plan is probably
best. 10. Nxb5 cxb5 11. Bxf7+ Kxf7 12. Qf3+ and Qxa8 takes most
of the attacking possibilities out of the position and White gets
only a rook and 2 pawns for 3 pieces) 10. bxc3 N8e7 11. f4 0-0
12. Bd3 (not 12. f5 Nxf5 13. Rxf5 d5) 12...f5 13. exf6 Rxf6 14. f5
Nh8 15. Bg5 with attack.


As I said I played in another game but from white point of view: 9.0-0
Bxc3 10.bxc3 Qe7! and I had big problems. In some moments of those two
games I thought I would obtain only half point from both games!!

9...Kxf7 10. Qc4+ Kf8


Black is following his plan, but 10...d5 was also possible. This
costs a pawn but activates the black pieces. Since Black has more
pieces than White he should look to activate them whenever he can.
A possible line is 11. exd6 Be6 12. Qxb4 Qb6 13. Qa3 (13. Qc5 Qxc5
14. dxc5 Bf5 the black pieces become active) 13...Nf6 (or 13...Qxd4!?
14. 0-0 Nf6 15. Be3 Qe5) 14. Be3 Nd5 15. 0-0-0 Qb4. The pawn d6 is
beginning to feel lonely.


Yes 10..d5 is also possible. It's Mr Wind suggestion in Kaissiber
magazine article and gives also winning chances to black. He suggest the
same lines you do, but prefers 13.Qc5.

Later in the game I sacrified a third pawn to activate my pieces and now
I can do it in good circunstances. I'm not sure about what is best
continuation here.

11. Qxb4+ Qe7 12. Qxe7+ N8xe7 13. b3


The white counterplay is based on restricting the black pieces as
much as possible. White intends to blockade d6 with a piece.


Black need to solve the Bc8 development and the coordination of rooks.
It seemed to me that black must prepare ...d5 and white plays against
this plan.

Nf5 14.Ba3+ Kf7 15. O-O-O d5?


Sacrifices a pawn to develop the Bc8 but overlooks a white counter
(see later). The principal move and much better in my opinion was
15...Rd8. This prepares d5. If White wants to prevent d5 the only
practible move is 16. g4. 16. Ne4 doesn´t work because 16...Nf4
threatening Ne2+ and Nxg2 wins a pawn which White can´t afford to
lose. But after 16. g4 White has a lot weak dark squares. The black
knights then go on a rampage while the white dark-squared bishop is
far away.

For example 16. g4 Nfh4 17. h3 (if White doesn´t protect
g4 and seeks to control d6 instead with 17. Ne4 then 17...d5
unleashes a tornado of black light pieces: 18. Nd6+ Rxd6 19. Bxd6
(19. exd6 seeks counterplay on the e-file but isn´t any better.
19...Bxg4 20. Rd2 [20. Re1 Ng2 21. Reg1 Bf3 22. Kd2 Re8 23. Rc1 Re2+
24. Kc3 Ke6. White is totally helpless.] 20...Nf4 21. Re1 Re8
22. Re3 Nf3. Total domination.) 19...Bg4 20. f3 (20. Rd2 Nf3
21. Rdd1 Nf4 and White is helpless against Bh3 and Bg2.) 20...Bxf3
21. Rhf1 Ke6 22. Rd2 Nf4 23. Rdf2 (23. c4 g5. Black safeguards
the light pieces and plans Bg4, Nf3 and the activation of the rook.
White doesn´t have the slightest chance of counterplay.) 23...Ne2+
24. Kd2 Nxd4 25. c3 Nf5 26. Rxf3 Nxf3+ 27. Rxf3 Nxd6 28. exd6 Rd8!
wins.) 17...Nf4 18. Ne4 (White can try to attack the knights with
the bishop 18. Kb1 Nf3 19. Bc1 Ne6 20. Ne2 (or 20. Be3 d6 and the
center is cracked) c5 21. c3 b6. If the white d-pawn advances the
e-pawn will be lost.


As i said, it seems something missing in your comment, ... I will
comment this interesting suggestion in a separate email.

16. exd6 Re8


If Black intended 16...Rd8 17. d5 would have kept the pawn.

17. g3


A fine move which restricts the black knights.

17...b6 18. f3


At first I thought this may be a mistake, because it loses control of
e3. But I`m not sure if Black can get anything out of it. He could
trade a rook with 18...Re3 19. Ne4 h6 20. Rhf1 Re2 21. Rf2. But I
can´t figure out if this is good or bad for Black. I tend to think
it´s better than not because otherwise White may double the rooks
on the e-file and pressure against e7.


A very acurate comment again! In my opinion black need to maintain one
rook to have atacking chances with his piece up, but two rooks is not
necessary.
I studied the rook move 18...Re3 for a while and after not viewing any
"clear advantage for black" continuation, I decided not to play my rook
in a difficult situation with no escape: I had a look at 18...Re3
19.Ne4 h6 20.h4!? Rxf3 21.h5 Nh8 22.g4 and I have some problems with my
Nh8, defending g7 and avoiding Re7. Maybe I can reorganize my pieces
here and white must play 20.Rhf1, but it seemed to me that black must
have safer continuations.

18...Bb7 19. Ne4 Ke6 20. c4 c5


Probably I don´t know what´s going on here. I would have preferred
doubling the rooks on the e-file first, then go looking for better
squares for my knights and maybe then doing something for real (Kd7,
Re6, Rae8). As Black I wouldn´t be afraid of White pushing the pawn
to c5. It would give me a great square for my knight (d5) rendering
the white bishop useless.


The problem of allowing white c5 is that my Bb7 is out of play.
After 20...c5 long diagonal is open and 21.d5?! is the only move to
close it but gives black advantage (losing the d6 pawn and allowing
black to open lines with a later ...b5).
I played 20...c5 because I check the "normal" 21.dxc5 Kd7! (menacing
22...Ne5) and after moves like Rd2, Nc3 or Bb2 I found black advantage.

But strong players in chess know when "normal continuations" lead to
defeat and it's necessary to find special moves to fight, and Mr Hoynck
decission was the correct one in that position. I did not analyze his
special move (21.Bxc5) as deeply as he did,, and maybe (if black can not
improve the remaining play) I played badly here or in previous moves.
I say "previous moves" because I had in the preceding moves the idea of
playing ...c5 in some moment to open lines to my pieces (specially my
Bb7) and maybe I did not play ...c5 in the correct moment.

I think Mr Hoynck played here a deep move not because he find a good
combination but because he found that he should change the course of
events and He did it in the correct moment.

21. Bxc5


That came as a bit of surprise!

Kd7 22. Rhe1 bxc5 23. Nxc5+ Kc6 24. d7


The point of the white combination. Unfortunately I´m now lacking
the time to do more analysis. May be more in a few days.


The actual point was that after 24...Rxe1 25.Rxe1 Nf8 white has the
powerfull 26.b4!! and white pawns are very strong, ... without that b4
black would have been ok.
And it's not clear for black if after that has to play for equality or
to try maintaining winning chances but with risky decisions.
I tried the last approach but I decided to force draw in my 35th move as
I said a in previous post.

Claus-Juergen


  #9  
Old July 6th 03, 03:30 AM
Antonio Torrecillas
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En/na Antonio Torrecillas ha escrit:
Hello Claus-Jürgen,

(...)
Kd7 22. Rhe1 bxc5 23. Nxc5+ Kc6 24. d7


The actual point was that after 24...Rxe1 25.Rxe1 Nf8 white has the
powerfull 26.b4!! and white pawns are very strong, ... without that b4
black would have been ok.
And it's not clear for black if after that has to play for equality or
to try maintaining winning chances but with risky decisions.
I tried the last approach but I decided to force draw in my 35th move as
I said a in previous post.


Sorry, ... 33th move (33...Bxf3)

  #10  
Old July 8th 03, 12:47 AM
Antonio Torrecillas
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En/na Claus-Jürgen Heigl ha escrit:
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5 Nxe5 5. d4 Ng6
6. e5 Ng8 7. Bc4 c6 8.Qe2 Bb4 9.Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qc4+ Kf8
11. Qxb4+ Qe7 12. Qxe7+ N8xe7 13. b3 Nf5 14.Ba3+ Kf7
15. O-O-O d5?
Sacrifices a pawn to develop the Bc8 but overlooks a white counter
(see later). The principal move and much better in my opinion was
15...Rd8. This prepares d5. If White wants to prevent d5 the only
practible move is 16. g4. 16. Ne4 doesn´t work because 16...Nf4
threatening Ne2+ and Nxg2 wins a pawn which White can´t afford to
lose. But after 16. g4 White has a lot weak dark squares. The black
knights then go on a rampage while the white dark-squared bishop is
far away.
For example 16. g4 Nfh4 17. h3 (if White doesn´t protect
g4 and seeks to control d6 instead with 17. Ne4 then 17...d5 unleashes
a tornado of black light pieces: 18. Nd6+ Rxd6 19. Bxd6 (19. exd6
seeks counterplay on the e-file but isn´t any better. 19...Bxg4 20.
Rd2 [20. Re1 Ng2 21. Reg1 Bf3 22. Kd2 Re8 23. Rc1 Re2+ 24. Kc3 Ke6.
White is totally helpless.] 20...Nf4 21. Re1 Re8 22. Re3 Nf3. Total
domination.) 19...Bg4 20. f3 (20. Rd2 Nf3 21. Rdd1 Nf4 and White is
helpless against Bh3 and Bg2.) 20...Bxf3
21. Rhf1 Ke6 22. Rd2 Nf4 23. Rdf2 (23. c4 g5. Black safeguards
the light pieces and plans Bg4, Nf3 and the activation of the rook.
White doesn´t have the slightest chance of counterplay.) 23...Ne2+
24. Kd2 Nxd4 25. c3 Nf5 26. Rxf3 Nxf3+ 27. Rxf3 Nxd6 28. exd6 Rd8!
wins.) 17...Nf4 18. Ne4 (White can try to attack the knights with the
bishop 18. Kb1 Nf3 19. Bc1 Ne6 20. Ne2 (or 20. Be3 d6 and the center
is cracked) c5 21. c3 b6. If the white d-pawn advances the e-pawn will
be lost.


16. exd6 Re8 (...)
Claus-Juergen


I wrote I will comment this 15th move in a separate email. It seemed to
me your comment was not complete. I suppose you suggested as best:
15...Rd8 16.g4 Nfh4 17.h3 Nf4 18.Ne4 and here your line finish. Maybe
your suggestion continues with 18...d5 now?

You know that during our OTB chess games all we have a lot of doubts in
each choice. In email chess the situation is very similar: in most moves
we have two or more options I'm not sure about what's best one and often
computer analysis can not help.

In that case, I'm not sure about if I was right, I had the idea of
freeing my Bc8 and played ...d5 (which seems good). Once the game is
finished I continue not being sure about if I took the correct decision.
In many times of this game I analyzed similar lines than yours where
white plays g4 and black has an strong bockade in f4 and that seems very
good for black.

A possibility is 15...Rd8 16.g4 Nfh4 17.Bd6 and black seems to have the
desired blockade but continues with the Bc8 problems. Black is better,
but the question is if he is better than in other line. What do you
think? or what would you have thought if I have not post the draw line
in 34th move?

It seems to me that white played very well after my 15...d5 (for example
his 17.g3!). Maybe If I had played 15...Rd8 and the black development
problems had produced a later draw I would be saying now that 15...d5
would be better (without anticipating nothing of the following moves in
the actual game in 15...d5 line).

Another related question: ... was 14...Ke8 preferable? If I want to play
....d5, it seems better to have my king near to d7 but after Ke8 there
are two problems: white can play faster in e file and rooks
communication is delayed for 1 or more moves. I'm not sure either in
this case what was the correct king move.

----------

About this first half of the game: I had the sensation to be oputplayed
for my opponent, from a "bad" opening line I obtained a clearly better
ending but after the first 24 moves I can play "to force draw" or I can
play "for the three results".

Antonio Torrecillas

 




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