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Question on Danish Gambit Variation



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 29th 03, 10:14 PM
Mr. Plow
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Default Question on Danish Gambit Variation

Actually, I'm not sure if it's a Danish or a Goring, or perhaps common to
both.

After 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 ed 4.c3 dc 5.Bc4 cb 6.Bxb2, I played the
natural-looking 6...Nf6. When I went to look up the variation later, I
could not find mention of it in any of my references, the main lines being
instead 6...d6 or 6...Bb4+.

I assumed the move is so obviously bad that it's not worth commenting on.
The logical defect of 6...Nf6 is that it exposes the Nf6 to the thematic,
space-gaining e5. But 7.e5 does not look like an immediate refutation
because of 7...Bb4+ 8.Nbd2 Ne4, or 7...Bb4+ 8.Nc3 Ne4, and it looks like
Black gets to keep his pawn with a decent game.

Is 6...Nf6 solid, or have I missed something for white. Maybe instead of
the immediate 7.e5 he has something that prepares e5 with more lethal
effect, but I can't find it.

Thanks


  #2  
Old July 30th 03, 12:54 AM
joe
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Default Question on Danish Gambit Variation

In article ,
"Mr. Plow" wrote:

Actually, I'm not sure if it's a Danish or a Goring, or perhaps common to
both.


This is technically a Göring gambit; it can easily be reached by
transposition from a Danish via this line: 1. e4 e5 2. d4 ed 3. c3 dc 4.
Bc4 cb 5. Bxb2 6. Nc6 Nf3, although Nf3 is arguably not best here. Note
that in the main Göring lines White generally does not gambit the second
pawn (play most commonly continues 5. Nxc3 Bb4). Gambiting the second
pawn isn't bad, but if you are going to gambit the second pawn, I think
it's probably better to do so in a Danish. This way you may be able to
avoid the move Nc6, which is a good defensive resource for White IMHO.

After 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 ed 4.c3 dc 5.Bc4 cb 6.Bxb2, I played the
natural-looking 6...Nf6. When I went to look up the variation later, I
could not find mention of it in any of my references, the main lines being
instead 6...d6 or 6...Bb4+.

I assumed the move is so obviously bad that it's not worth commenting on.
The logical defect of 6...Nf6 is that it exposes the Nf6 to the thematic,
space-gaining e5. But 7.e5 does not look like an immediate refutation
because of 7...Bb4+ 8.Nbd2 Ne4, or 7...Bb4+ 8.Nc3 Ne4, and it looks like
Black gets to keep his pawn with a decent game.


7... Bb4+ 8. Nc3 Ne4 looks inferior in view of 9. Qd5!

Is 6...Nf6 solid, or have I missed something for white. Maybe instead of
the immediate 7.e5 he has something that prepares e5 with more lethal
effect, but I can't find it.

Thanks



Nf6 certainly doesn't lose instantly. It may or may not be playable,
depending on the level of danger Black is willing to tolerate here.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 ed 4. c3 dc 5. Bc4 cb 6. Bxb2 Nf6 7. e5 d5!

This line occurs frequently in the Danish with the moves Nc6 and Nf3
omitted. In a Danish the line would continue 7. Bb5+ c6 8. ef6 cb5 8.
fg7 Bb4+!, resulting in an interesting battle of two big pawn
majorities, White's on the k-side and Black's on the q-side.

In a Göring the line looks to be sharper, and possibly worse for Black,
because the center opens up significantly more than it would in a
Danish. For instance 8. ef6 dc4 (not 8. Bb5 because of 8...Ne4) 9. Qe2+!
Be6 10. fg7 Bb4+ 11. Nc3, and now after 11...Rg8 or 11... Bxc3+ 12. Bxc3
Rg8, Black must worry about the possibility of a white rook coming to d1.
  #3  
Old July 30th 03, 12:52 PM
Claus-Jürgen Heigl
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Default Question on Danish Gambit Variation

joe wrote:

In a Göring the line looks to be sharper, and possibly worse for Black,
because the center opens up significantly more than it would in a
Danish. For instance 8. ef6 dc4 (not 8. Bb5 because of 8...Ne4) 9. Qe2+!
Be6 10. fg7 Bb4+ 11. Nc3, and now after 11...Rg8 or 11... Bxc3+ 12. Bxc3
Rg8, Black must worry about the possibility of a white rook coming to d1.


Interesting line, but me thinks (11...Rg8) White worries a bit about
his pawn on g7.

For example 12. 0-0 Rxg7 13. Qe2+ Kf8 14. Rad1 Qe7 15. Qxc4 Bh3.

Claus-Juergen
 




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