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1.a4 2.b3 3.Bb2



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 6th 03, 09:59 PM
John Gniadek
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Default 1.a4 2.b3 3.Bb2

i was hoping for some help. what would black's appropriate moves here
be? i know this is probably an inferior position for white, but is it
a losing position for white? also, when i check databases the only
games i can find that start out 1.a4 end in blacks immediate
resignation. why is this? alos, id like some very serious, honest
evaluation of this opening. thanks.
john
  #2  
Old August 7th 03, 12:16 AM
mdamien
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Default 1.a4 2.b3 3.Bb2

"John Gniadek" wrote in message
om...
i was hoping for some help. what would black's appropriate moves here
be? i know this is probably an inferior position for white, but is it
a losing position for white? also, when i check databases the only
games i can find that start out 1.a4 end in blacks immediate
resignation. why is this? alos, id like some very serious, honest
evaluation of this opening. thanks.


Given White's moves, Black's best play is 1. ... g6 and 2. ... Bg7. More
seriously, though, against White's early queenside fianchetto, Black can
play 1. ... e5, 2. ... d6, and play for a King's Indian type setup with g6
and Bg7. Or, Black could play for a full center with 2. ... Nc6 followed by
d5. Or Black could go for his own fianchetto on either side, as first
suggested (though a fianchetto on the queenside might not be as prudent with
the pawn at a4). White's 1. a4, if this is a stronger opponent you're
dealing with, is most-likely just to throw you out of any book preparation
(for a tempo) while perhaps grabbing some space on the queenside. If you're
looking to punish 1. a4 specifically, do so by getting your pieces developed
quickly without wasting any tempi of your own. Just some rough thoughts ...

Matt



  #3  
Old August 16th 03, 01:59 PM
Anthony Schleizer
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Default 1.a4 2.b3 3.Bb2

Perhaps just stick to basic principles and take control of the center
and blunt the a1-h8 diagonal, e.g.

1. a4 d5
2. b3 c5
3. Bb2 Nc6

with the idea of following up with e5, Be7, 0-0 or something like that.
Or, if you want to blunt the power of the Bishop on b2, you could go with

1. a4 e5
2. b3 Nc6
3. Bb2 d6

and follow up with Nf6, Be7, 0-0 (see for examle Minasian-Adams 1992).

As for evaluating the opening, it's probably not good to completely
ignore the center with a4. 1. b3 ... 2. Bb2 is the Nimzo-Larsen attack,
but in that case, White typically follows up with e3, Nf3 and Bb5 (if
possible) to fight for control of the e5 square.

Regards,

Tony

John Gniadek wrote:

i was hoping for some help. what would black's appropriate moves here
be? i know this is probably an inferior position for white, but is it
a losing position for white? also, when i check databases the only
games i can find that start out 1.a4 end in blacks immediate
resignation. why is this? alos, id like some very serious, honest
evaluation of this opening. thanks.
john


 




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