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Analysis of Game Please



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 15th 03, 06:56 AM
DeepPatz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis of Game Please

I have read analyses of games posted to this newsgroup and have gained
from the answers given by the people in this group. Frequently I will
print off a number of analyses which can give me a number of different
insights into the positions in a single game. Very useful!

Could a number of people give me an analysis of the following game I
played (as white) against a freeware chess engine I downloaded from
the net?

Thanks to all in advance and apologies for any formatting mistakes.

[Event ""]
[Site ""]
[Date "2003.08.05"]
[Round ""]
[White "Paul"]
[Black "Polar"]
[Result "*"]


1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.Bc4 Bc5

4.Nc3 Nf6

5.O-O d6

6.d3 O-O

7.a3
{7.a3 was played to prevent ...Bb4 or ...Na4 and also gives my
bishop
the a2 square to retreat to if black plays ...Na5 as I like the
bishop
being on this diagonal.}

7...Bg4
{Black's light square bishop is his "good" bishop and if he wished
to
swap it for a knight I was happy to let him.}
8.h3
{Asking the question}
8...Bxf3

9.Qxf3
{And I am happy with the answer.}
9...Bd4
{I thought he would play the knight to d4 attacking the queen. I
thought 10.Ne2 would be best attcking the knight and hoping for
11...exd4 but expected 11...Nxd4.}
10.Ne2

10...Qe8
{I could not see the purpose of 10...Qe8.}

11.Nxd4 Nxd4

12.Qd1
{Protecting c2 pawn.}
12...Qa4

13.c3
{I played 13.c3 expecting 13...Qxd1 14.Rxd1 Ne2+ 15.Kf1 Nxc1
16.Raxc1 which I saw would give me a lead in development.}

13...Qxd1

14.Rxd1 Ne2+

15.Kf1 Nxc1

16.Raxc1 c6

17.f3
{With queens off the board I was not too worried about moving
pawns in front of my king.}

17...d5

18.exd5 cxd5

19.Bb3 Rfe8

20.Re1
{Rooks should be in open files.}

20...Re7

21.d4
{I assumed his 20...Re7 was to allow him to double rooks in the e
file but saw I could prevent this with Ba4. I also saw that he
couldn't
defend the e7 rook and therefore his e4 pawn was pinned to the e7
rook. Therefore I played 21.d4 expecting 21...e4 22.fxe4 dxe4
giving him an isolated e pawn.}

21...e4

22.fxe4 dxe4

23.Re3
{Now I have the isolated e pawn to attack.}

23...a6

24.Rce1 Rae8

25.g4
{With the intent of g5 removing a defender}

25...h6
{ In this position I saw a number of factors as follows:a) Black
has isolated e pawn (which is also passed) b) I have protected passed
d pawnc) 27.g5 hxg5 would open up black's h file. Maybe I could block
the e pawn with my king and attack black's king side with my two
rooks. The problem is that I don't know which strategy to follow?!}

26.Bc2 Re6

27.Ke2
{Trying to use my king to block and attack e pawn while releasing
a
rook for other duties.}

27...Nd5
{I had anticipated Nd5 but had Rg3 as a reply.}

28.Rg3 R6e7

29.Bb3 Nf4+

30.Ke3
{I wasn't getting anywhere attacking the e pawn so I thought I
would block it with the king and look elsewhere for attacking
opportunities}

30...Nd3

31.Rb1 g5

32.Bc2 Nf4

33.Rh1
{Planning to open the h file and use both rooks to attack down h
file}

33...b5

34.h4 Ra7

35.hxg5 hxg5

36.Rh6
{Trying to get my rooks as active as possible}

36...a5

37.Rg1 Kg7

38.Rgh1 Nd5+

39.Ke2 Nf6

40.R6h3
{I could not see any chances up the h file so I came back}

40...Nxg4
{I hadn't seen this capture earlier. Only noticed it when I had to
get my rook back down the h file. I can always make these sort of
errors!}

41.Rg3 f5

42.d5
{Must admit I was getting a bit desperate for ideas here so I
thought I should push the passed pawn.}

42...Rd7

43.Rd1 Kg6

44.a4
{I saw that the black rooks were on the same diagonal and
therefore
44...bxa4 45.Bxa4 could win me the exchange.}
44...Nf6

45.axb5 f4

46.Rgg1 Nxd5

47.c4
{I did not think black would play 46...Nxd5 because it pins the
knight to the d7 rook and then 47.c4 wins the knight. What I did not
see was Nf6 which escapes the c4 attack and defends the d7 rook.}

47...f3+

48.Kf2 Nf6

49.Rxd7 Nxd7

50.Re1 Kf5

51.Ba4 Ne5

52.b6 Rh8

53.Ke3
{Here I resigned as I could see I was going to go down even more
material!}

*
  #2  
Old August 15th 03, 08:15 AM
Ron
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis of Game Please

In article ,
(DeepPatz) wrote:

I'll take a crack at this. Bear in mind, I make plenty of mistakes
myself. If something doesn't seem right to you here, it could easily be
that I'm wrong!

1.e4 e5
2.Nf3 Nc6
3.Bc4 Bc5
4.Nc3 Nf6


I wouldn't describe 4.Nc3 as wrong, but it's very passive. 4.c3 is a
more aggressive attempt to take control of the center. Generally, your
next several moves are all very passive.

5.O-O d6
6.d3 O-O


Again, nothing "wrong" here, but I might delay castling to maintain the
option of castling long and launching a kingside pawn storm (a plan that
can be very powerful). You're playing very quietly here, and I think you
should be looking for more aggresive moves.


7.a3
{7.a3 was played to prevent ...Bb4 or ...Na4 and also gives my
bishop
the a2 square to retreat to if black plays ...Na5 as I like the
bishop
being on this diagonal.}


I don't like this move very much. Bg5 (threatening Nd5) is more
aggressive. And if ...h6 Be3! is not bad. (I might even be considering
Be3 right off the bat. If he trades bishops, you have an open file for
your rook and the d4 square is nicely protected.

7...Bg4
{Black's light square bishop is his "good" bishop and if he wished
to
swap it for a knight I was happy to let him.}
8.h3
{Asking the question}


Hopefully, you played this recognizing the potential threat of Nd4.

8...Bxf3




9.Qxf3
{And I am happy with the answer.}


Indeed, but a lot of players will play Bg4xf3 by rote, and if you
haven't castled yet, you can recapture with the pawn and get a nice open
file against his king.



9...Bd4
{I thought he would play the knight to d4 attacking the queen. I
thought 10.Ne2 would be best attcking the knight and hoping for
11...exd4 but expected 11...Nxd4.}
10.Ne2

10...Qe8
{I could not see the purpose of 10...Qe8.}


Well, this might be a fuction of playing a relatively weak computer in
a closer position.


11.Nxd4 Nxd4


I like c3 a lot more than Nd4. You have the bishop pair, so opening the
position is wise. This also starts threatening to build a big center.

12.Qd1
{Protecting c2 pawn.}
12...Qa4

13.c3
{I played 13.c3 expecting 13...Qxd1 14.Rxd1 Ne2+ 15.Kf1 Nxc1
16.Raxc1 which I saw would give me a lead in development.}


Well, I don't see that lead in development as being very meaningful.
yeah, your rooks are better placed, but it doesn't look to me like it's
going to amount to much.



13...Qxd1
14.Rxd1 Ne2+
15.Kf1 Nxc1
16.Raxc1 c6

17.f3
{With queens off the board I was not too worried about moving
pawns in front of my king.}


That's reasonable, but be aware of the dark squares you're
weakening--your bishop can't protect them, and his knight could find a
very happy home there. Also, you don't seem to be recognizing his threat.

17...d5
18.exd5 cxd5
19.Bb3 Rfe8

20.Re1
{Rooks should be in open files.}


True. But this sort of demonstates the illusory nature of your lead in
development--yes, your rooks were off their original squares, but you
had to move them again to get them to the right squares. You want your
rooks on d1 and e1, i think, but there's no quick way to get them there
from d1 an c1.

20...Re7

21.d4
{I assumed his 20...Re7 was to allow him to double rooks in the e
file but saw I could prevent this with Ba4. I also saw that he
couldn't
defend the e7 rook and therefore his e4 pawn was pinned to the e7
rook. Therefore I played 21.d4 expecting 21...e4 22.fxe4 dxe4
giving him an isolated e pawn.}


That's not a bad thought process, but think about that pawn for a
minute. Two things come to mind. First of all, it's not really isolated
(the knight moves, the king moves, and the f-pawn moves, and it's not
isolated). Also, it's passed--it's not just a target, in other words,
it's a weapon.

21...e4

22.fxe4 dxe4

23.Re3
{Now I have the isolated e pawn to attack.}


Indeed. Nevertheless, while blocking the pawn is a good idea, there
needs to be another component to your plan-- your passed d-pawn!

Just like his passed e-pawn is a weapon, so is your passed d-pawn. Use
it. Blockading the pawn on a light square (where you can attack it with
your bishop is good.

23...a6

24.Rce1 Rae8

25.g4
{With the intent of g5 removing a defender}


I don't really this plan. Look, right now all his pieces are defending
the pawn, and yes, you can dislodge them, but the thing is that you're
really reduced the activity of your rooks.

First of all, not that you have one piece that isn't doing anything:
your king! I'd think about trying to move the king up to take over the
blockading duties, so you can shift your rooks the the d-file and push
your pawn.

25...h6
{ In this position I saw a number of factors as follows:a) Black
has isolated e pawn (which is also passed) b) I have protected passed
d pawnc) 27.g5 hxg5 would open up black's h file. Maybe I could block
the e pawn with my king and attack black's king side with my two
rooks. The problem is that I don't know which strategy to follow?!}


Okay, his pawn isn't isolated, although he can't, at the moment, protect
it.

I think attacking down the h-file would be a big mistake. Don't
de-centralize your rooks. Your rooks belong behind your passed pawn. Get
your king into the game and then start playing to make him choke on your
d-pawn.


26.Bc2 Re6

27.Ke2
{Trying to use my king to block and attack e pawn while releasing
a
rook for other duties.}


It's a good idea, but a poor execution. You're giving him a chance to
free his pieces. I'd be thinking about Kf2-g3-f4. of course, that falls
to Nd5+ so to start it out you need to play c4. But the point is, is
there anything black can do to counter this plan? If at any point he
moves his knight, you capture the pawn--it's slow, but it looks
absoltuely decisive. He will lose his passed pawn, you will keep yours.

Getting here isn't that hard. Simply think: "What do I have to do to win
his e-pawn?" The answer is: attack it four times--he can only defend it
thrice.

"But if I move my king up he checks at d5" so take away the check.

27...Nd5
{I had anticipated Nd5 but had Rg3 as a reply.}
28.Rg3 R6e7


You say you can planned this reply, but I find myself wondering why.
You've moved your rook away from the center. The action is on the d, e,
and f files. The g-file isn't particularly relevant at the moment.

29.Bb3 Nf4+

30.Ke3
{I wasn't getting anywhere attacking the e pawn so I thought I
would block it with the king and look elsewhere for attacking
opportunities}


The problem is that while your king position has improved, his knight
position has improved move, and his pieces are no longer tied down to
the defense of the pawn. Now that knight has the potential to wreck
havoc on your weak dark squares.

30...Nd3
31.Rb1 g5


Note how your rooks, which were attacking, are now defending. You've
lost the initiative.

32.Bc2 Nf4

33.Rh1
{Planning to open the h file and use both rooks to attack down h
file}


This is a huge mistake. Why attack down the h-file. Sure, it's possible
to imagine black stupidly missing a threat and letting your rooks
penetrate. But his knight is in the neihborhood--ready to help with the
defense. And it's not hard for black to play Kg7 and Rh8 to challange
you.

No--you need to find a plan that threatens to make him really hurt. What
is that plan? Pushing your d-pawn. The rook belongs on d1, where it
supports your pawns advance!

Although, to be fair, you pretty much have to advance your h-pawn,
because otherwise your g3 rook is stuck on g3 forever, tied to it's
defense.

33...b5


I suspect at this point you said to yourself, "Great! He's not doing
anything to stop my plan!"

But instead think about what plan he is stopping. What he's doing is
making it harder for you to advance your passed pawn. What does that
suggest about what the computer is "worried" about?

34.h4 Ra7

35.hxg5 hxg5

36.Rh6
{Trying to get my rooks as active as possible}


It's a good thought. This isn't a bad square for the rook, harassing his
queenside pawns.

I'd still rather have it on d1 though. You could have won this game
without playing to win a pawn--by making him hurt with your d-pawn.
Combining an attack on his e-pawn with threats to advance your e-pawn,
supported by your rooks, would have been a very powerful plan.

36...a5

37.Rg1 Kg7

38.Rgh1 Nd5+


You've succesfully doubled up on the open file. The problem is, I don't
see what it gets you.

39.Ke2 Nf6

40.R6h3
{I could not see any chances up the h file so I came back}


To me, this is far more bothersome than the fact that you hung a pawn.

It indicates the flaw in your thought process. You're not really making
a plan--you're grabbing onto an idea, whimsically, and giving it a quick
try, and if nothing comes of it, you're abandoning it with a waste of
time.

You've done this twice in this game. "I couldn't win the e-pawn" and "I
couldn't get down the h-file." You're not looking hard enough. I'm not
sure what gold you thought lay down the h-file, but you need to stop and
think when you get those ideas, "How am I going to win the e-pawn?"
"What am I going to do once I have the h-file?" And if you can't answer
those questions, don't use that plan!

You could have won the e-pawn, but you didn't think it through
carefully enough. As for the h-file, well, a pawn is a small price to
pay for the amount of time wasting you've been doing.

40...Nxg4
{I hadn't seen this capture earlier. Only noticed it when I had to
get my rook back down the h file. I can always make these sort of
errors!}
41.Rg3 f5


Now you're in a bad way.

42.d5
{Must admit I was getting a bit desperate for ideas here so I
thought I should push the passed pawn.}


ARRGH! Of course, that was the right plan all along. But now is not the
right time--the right time would have been when your rooks where
supporting that advance--rooks belong behind passed pawns!

Set up the position after Re3 again and take a long look at it. I'd
like to suggest an alternative way of thinking about that position:

One of your rooks, your most powerful pieces, is tied down passively to
blockading a measely pawn of his.

Now, had you been able to win the pawn, great. But you didn't follow
through with the plan properly. But the reason why I mention it is that
I want to point out how powerful his e-pawn is now, supporting by that
rook. THAT COULD HAVE BEEN YOUR D-PAWN!

42...Rd7

43.Rd1 Kg6

44.a4
{I saw that the black rooks were on the same diagonal and
therefore
44...bxa4 45.Bxa4 could win me the exchange.}


It's good that you saw that. But you have to take it one step forward.
"Okay, bxa4 Bxa4 wins me the exchange--so he won't play bxa4. What else
might he play?"

44...Nf6

45.axb5 f4

46.Rgg1 Nxd5

47.c4
{I did not think black would play 46...Nxd5 because it pins the
knight to the d7 rook and then 47.c4 wins the knight. What I did not
see was Nf6 which escapes the c4 attack and defends the d7 rook.}


Yeah. But Rxd5 is just as bad, if not worse, for you since it seizes
control of the open file or forced a rook trade.

47...f3+

48.Kf2 Nf6

49.Rxd7 Nxd7

50.Re1 Kf5


You didn't think he was going to hang the pawn, did you?

You just forced him to improve his position--by advancing his king.


  #3  
Old August 15th 03, 03:47 PM
mdamien
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis of Game Please

"DeepPatz" wrote in message
om...
I have read analyses of games posted to this newsgroup and have gained
from the answers given by the people in this group. Frequently I will
print off a number of analyses which can give me a number of different
insights into the positions in a single game. Very useful!

Could a number of people give me an analysis of the following game I
played (as white) against a freeware chess engine I downloaded from
the net?

Thanks to all in advance and apologies for any formatting mistakes.

[Event ""]
[Site ""]
[Date "2003.08.05"]
[Round ""]
[White "Paul"]
[Black "Polar"]
[Result "*"]


1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.Bc4 Bc5

4.Nc3


In this position, the idea is usually to play c3 followed by d4, securing a
strong center. The Evans Gambit sacrifices a pawn for a tempo, starting with
b4 so that, after Bxb4, c3 can be played, again with the idea of following
it up with d4, but this time attacking the bishop and therefore gaining the
tempo. It all leads to very exciting games, but against a computer your
safe-solid approach may not be so bad.

... Nf6

5.O-O d6

6.d3 O-O

7.a3
{7.a3 was played to prevent ...Bb4 or ...Na4 and also gives my
bishop
the a2 square to retreat to if black plays ...Na5 as I like the
bishop
being on this diagonal.}


OK, fair enough.


7...Bg4
{Black's light square bishop is his "good" bishop and if he wished
to
swap it for a knight I was happy to let him.}
8.h3
{Asking the question}
8...Bxf3

9.Qxf3
{And I am happy with the answer.}
9...Bd4
{I thought he would play the knight to d4 attacking the queen. I
thought 10.Ne2 would be best attcking the knight and hoping for
11...exd4 but expected 11...Nxd4.}


I think you mean 10. Ne2 attacking the bishop.

10.Ne2


As a general course of action, I'd be looking to play f4 at some point.
Prior to that, you'd need to move the queen and do something about the a7-g1
diagonal, such as Kh1. Ne2 has its benefits, as it does free up c3 and
address the diagonal (by attacking the bishop); alternately, it adds extra
support to the pawn break at f4, but since it cramps your queen's, sitting
at e2, you'd probably have to follow through with the exchange (where Nxd4,
Nxd4, Qd1 with an eventual c3, driving back the knight, would be pretty much
forced).


10...Qe8
{I could not see the purpose of 10...Qe8.}


No doubt it was looking at 11. Nxd4 Nxd4, 12. Qd1 Qa4, 13. c3 Qxd1, 14. Rxd1
Ne2+, 15. Kf1 Nxc1, 16. Raxc1 c6 (as was played, and which is all pretty
forcing) and evaluated a slight edge on account of the strong center it
could gain after d5, despite the knight vs. bishop. As an alternative, it
could have backed up the bishop with 10. ... Bb6, but that might end up a
wasted tempo after 11. Be3 Bxe3 (which is just the sort of position where
Tarrasch would have argued for fxe3, opening the f-file, in contrast to
Steinitz's Qxe3, preserving the pawn structure).

11.Nxd4 Nxd4

12.Qd1
{Protecting c2 pawn.}
12...Qa4

13.c3
{I played 13.c3 expecting 13...Qxd1 14.Rxd1 Ne2+ 15.Kf1 Nxc1
16.Raxc1 which I saw would give me a lead in development.}


With this much material off the board, a lead in development can only be
measured if your pieces are actually in the right places -- which is to say,
if a file opens up, will your rooks be able to take advantage of it?

13...Qxd1

14.Rxd1 Ne2+

15.Kf1 Nxc1

16.Raxc1 c6

17.f3
{With queens off the board I was not too worried about moving
pawns in front of my king.}


True.

17...d5

18.exd5 cxd5

19.Bb3 Rfe8

20.Re1
{Rooks should be in open files.}


This is semi-open, actually, unless you can open it up.

20...Re7

21.d4
{I assumed his 20...Re7 was to allow him to double rooks in the e
file but saw I could prevent this with Ba4. I also saw that he
couldn't
defend the e7 rook and therefore his e4 pawn was pinned to the e7
rook. Therefore I played 21.d4 expecting 21...e4 22.fxe4 dxe4
giving him an isolated e pawn.}


Technically, it's not isolated -- but OK.


21...e4

22.fxe4 dxe4

23.Re3
{Now I have the isolated e pawn to attack.}

23...a6

24.Rce1 Rae8

25.g4
{With the intent of g5 removing a defender}

25...h6
{ In this position I saw a number of factors as follows:a) Black
has isolated e pawn (which is also passed) b) I have protected passed
d pawnc) 27.g5 hxg5 would open up black's h file. Maybe I could block
the e pawn with my king and attack black's king side with my two
rooks. The problem is that I don't know which strategy to follow?!}


It does seem that White may have a slight edge here. Maybe the thing is to
start marching the d pawn, I'm not sure. It would be nice to trade off the
rooks and play for your Bishop vs Knight and queenside majority.

26.Bc2 Re6

27.Ke2
{Trying to use my king to block and attack e pawn while releasing
a
rook for other duties.}


Could throw in a Bb3 to see if a draw is at hand. I don't like bringing my
king up in the e file like this -- it doesn't seem to have any future that
it wouldn't have at f2, unless the plan is to bring it to c3, in which case
a preparatory c4 might be in order.


27...Nd5
{I had anticipated Nd5 but had Rg3 as a reply.}


Not so much a reply, as a saving move. That knight's looking dangerous.

28.Rg3 R6e7
29.Bb3 Nf4+

30.Ke3
{I wasn't getting anywhere attacking the e pawn so I thought I
would block it with the king and look elsewhere for attacking
opportunities}

30...Nd3


This knight, now, is VERY dangerous.

31.Rb1 g5

32.Bc2 Nf4

33.Rh1
{Planning to open the h file and use both rooks to attack down h
file}

33...b5

34.h4 Ra7

35.hxg5 hxg5

36.Rh6
{Trying to get my rooks as active as possible}

36...a5

37.Rg1 Kg7

38.Rgh1 Nd5+

39.Ke2 Nf6

40.R6h3
{I could not see any chances up the h file so I came back}

40...Nxg4
{I hadn't seen this capture earlier. Only noticed it when I had to
get my rook back down the h file. I can always make these sort of
errors!}


Yes, you're in trouble now. The computer's playing a good game though.

41.Rg3 f5

42.d5
{Must admit I was getting a bit desperate for ideas here so I
thought I should push the passed pawn.}


In terms of desperation, I'd go with the exchange sac -- 43. Rxg4 fxg4 44.
Rg1. Might be able to hold on for a while, and you get to practice an
unusual ending.


42...Rd7

43.Rd1 Kg6

44.a4
{I saw that the black rooks were on the same diagonal and
therefore
44...bxa4 45.Bxa4 could win me the exchange.}
44...Nf6

45.axb5 f4

46.Rgg1 Nxd5

47.c4
{I did not think black would play 46...Nxd5 because it pins the
knight to the d7 rook and then 47.c4 wins the knight. What I did not
see was Nf6 which escapes the c4 attack and defends the d7 rook.}

47...f3+

48.Kf2 Nf6

49.Rxd7 Nxd7

50.Re1 Kf5

51.Ba4 Ne5

52.b6 Rh8

53.Ke3
{Here I resigned as I could see I was going to go down even more
material!}


A good game. You were playing a rough opponent. Watch out for those
"attacking" pawn thrusts -- in this case, they were to Black's advantage.

Matt



  #4  
Old August 18th 03, 09:45 PM
Tony T. Warnock
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis of Game Please



DeepPatz wrote:

I have read analyses of games posted to this newsgroup and have gained
from the answers given by the people in this group. Frequently I will
print off a number of analyses which can give me a number of different
insights into the positions in a single game. Very useful!

Could a number of people give me an analysis of the following game I
played (as white) against a freeware chess engine I downloaded from
the net?

Thanks to all in advance and apologies for any formatting mistakes.

[Event ""]
[Site ""]
[Date "2003.08.05"]
[Round ""]
[White "Paul"]
[Black "Polar"]
[Result "*"]

1.e4 e5

2.Nf3 Nc6

3.Bc4 Bc5

4.Nc3 Nf6

5.O-O [ This is premature usually. In these types of symetrical Giuoco
Piano, it's not good to 0-0 early because of the ...Bg4 pin. In the
analogous 4 Kinghts (with Bb5 and Bb4), Castling is mandatory.) d6

6.d3 O-O [Black has much better play for the initiative with ...Bg4. On
7.h3 Bh5,8.g4, White has problems with ...Bg6 followed by ...h5 or even
perhaps 8...h5 immediately. Black will try to play ...Qd7, ...0-0-0, and
use a Kingside Pawn storm.]

7.a3
{7.a3 was played to prevent ...Bb4 or ...Na4 and also gives my
bishop
the a2 square to retreat to if black plays ...Na5 as I like the
bishop
being on this diagonal.} [a3 does give a good reatread in case of
...Na5. Black should play...Be6 however. The White's capture of the
Bishop opens the f-file for Black. This way Black ensures the exchange
of White's King's Bishop. 7.Bg5 is the Canal variation and one method
for trying for some initiative.]

7...Bg4
{Black's light square bishop is his "good" bishop and if he wished
to
swap it for a knight I was happy to let him.}
8.h3
{Asking the question}
8...Bxf3 [...Be6 may be as good.]

9.Qxf3
{And I am happy with the answer.}
9...Bd4 [I don't get the point of this move. The usual procedure in
these positions is to play ...Nd4 followed by ...c6 and ...d5. Black's
Knight can retreat to e6 if White plays Ne2.]
{I thought he would play the knight to d4 attacking the queen. I
thought 10.Ne2 would be best attcking the knight and hoping for
11...exd4 but expected 11...Nxd4.}
10.Ne2 [Bg5 seems good too. Black's doubled Pawns would be worse that
White's if there are several pieces on the board.]

10...Qe8
{I could not see the purpose of 10...Qe8.}[Me neither.]

11.Nxd4 [Bg5 looks good here. If ...Nd7 then c3.] Nxd4

12.Qd1
{Protecting c2 pawn.}
12...Qa4

13.c3 [b3 followed by c3 seems a bit better. White should be looking at
opening the f-file and playing Bg5. If White gives up the good Bishop,
then doubling Black's f-Pawns seems a worthy goal.]
{I played 13.c3 expecting 13...Qxd1 14.Rxd1 Ne2+ 15.Kf1 Nxc1
16.Raxc1 which I saw would give me a lead in development.}

13...Qxd1

14.Rxd1 Ne2+

15.Kf1 Nxc1

16.Raxc1 c6

17.f3 [Fine. White has the slight advantage of having a Bishop vs a
Kinght with Pawns on both sides of the board.]
{With queens off the board I was not too worried about moving
pawns in front of my king.}

17...d5

18.exd5 cxd5

19.Bb3 Rfe8

20.Re1 [d4 is possible. White needs a bit of opening of the position.
The strategy should be to keep Pawns on boths sided of the board and to
exchange Rooks.]
{Rooks should be in open files.}

20...Re7

21.d4
{I assumed his 20...Re7 was to allow him to double rooks in the e
file but saw I could prevent this with Ba4. I also saw that he
couldn't
defend the e7 rook and therefore his e4 pawn was pinned to the e7
rook. Therefore I played 21.d4 expecting 21...e4 22.fxe4 dxe4
giving him an isolated e pawn.}

21...e4

22.fxe4 dxe4

23.Re3
{Now I have the isolated e pawn to attack.}

23...a6

24.Rce1 Rae8

25.g4 [a4 with the twin ideas of playing a5 to fix Black's Pawns on the
white squares and of stopping ...b5 so as to allow c4 is possible too.]
{With the intent of g5 removing a defender}

25...h6
{ In this position I saw a number of factors as follows:a) Black
has isolated e pawn (which is also passed) b) I have protected passed
d pawnc) 27.g5 hxg5 would open up black's h file. Maybe I could block
the e pawn with my king and attack black's king side with my two
rooks. The problem is that I don't know which strategy to follow?!}

26.Bc2 [a4, the Bishop prevents ...Nd5 hitting the blockade square.] Re6
[I'm not sure what this accomplishes. Perhaps ...b5 or even ...g5 would
be better.]

27.Ke2 [Rooks don't blockade well. I still like a4 followed by a5]
{Trying to use my king to block and attack e pawn while releasing
a
rook for other duties.}

27...Nd5
{I had anticipated Nd5 but had Rg3 as a reply.}

28.Rg3 R6e7

29.Bb3 [see move 26] Nf4+

30.Ke3
{I wasn't getting anywhere attacking the e pawn so I thought I
would block it with the king and look elsewhere for attacking
opportunities} [White's attack on the e-Pawn serves to tie down Black's
pieces. White needs to play a4 and a5 then releast the pressure on the
e-Pawn.]

30...Nd3 [...g5 immediately leads to similar positions.]

31.Rb1 g5

32.Bc2 Nf4

33.Rh1
{Planning to open the h file and use both rooks to attack down h
file}

33...b5

34.h4 Ra7 [...Nd5 looks better. What's the Rook's supposed to do on a7?]

35.hxg5 hxg5 [White's problem is that the Rook on g3 takes an extra move
to get to the h-file.]

36.Rh6
{Trying to get my rooks as active as possible}

36...a5

37.Rg1 Kg7

38.Rgh1 Nd5+

39.Ke2 [Kf2 may be better so that Bd1 can defend the g-Pawn.] Nf6

40.R6h3 [This just loses a Pawn. Bd1 looks better. Then on ...Ng4, 41
Rb6. Now White is lost.]
{I could not see any chances up the h file so I came back}

40...Nxg4
{I hadn't seen this capture earlier. Only noticed it when I had to
get my rook back down the h file. I can always make these sort of
errors!}

41.Rg3 f5

42.d5
{Must admit I was getting a bit desperate for ideas here so I
thought I should push the passed pawn.}

42...Rd7 [...a4 to lock the Queenside.]

43.Rd1 Kg6 [...Rh8 is good too. Black can infltrate the h-file.]

44.a4
{I saw that the black rooks were on the same diagonal and
therefore
44...bxa4 45.Bxa4 could win me the exchange.}
44...Nf6

45.axb5 f4 [Two connected passed Pawns on the 6th (respectively 3rd)
rank are usually worth about a Rook. White is in serious trouble here.]

46.Rgg1 Nxd5

47.c4
{I did not think black would play 46...Nxd5 because it pins the
knight to the d7 rook and then 47.c4 wins the knight. What I did not
see was Nf6 which escapes the c4 attack and defends the d7 rook.}

47...f3+

48.Kf2 Nf6

49.Rxd7 Nxd7

50.Re1 [Ra1 puts up a better fight. White can try to get the a-Pawn. I
don't think that's sufficient ] Kf5

51.Ba4 Ne5

52.b6 Rh8

53.Ke3
{Here I resigned as I could see I was going to go down even more
material!}

*


 




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