A Chess forum. ChessBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » ChessBanter forum » Chess Newsgroups » rec.games.chess.analysis (Chess Analysis)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Vienna Gambit question



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 20th 03, 05:44 PM
chicagochess2003
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vienna Gambit question

In an old game against Matanovic the great David Bronstein once tried,
after the standard Vienna Gambit moves 1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.f4 d5, the
unusual 4.d3. This move is trickier than it looks, as the correct
reply is the not so obvious 4...exf4! Bronstein got nothing after
5.exd5 Nxd5 6.Nxd5 Qxd5 7.Bxf4 Bd6 8.Bxd6 Qxd6.

NCO gives this game and line (=/+), and a few other side lines after
4.d3 as well (p. 291). In the line above, it also gives 4.d3 exf4
5.Bxf4 Bb4 =/+. My question is, what if White plays 4.d3 exf4 5.e5?
Given that the alternatives are dismissed as =/+, it seems this
natural pawn thrust is at least worth a mention. Is there any theory
on this line?
  #2  
Old August 20th 03, 06:58 PM
Miriling
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Vienna Gambit question

Subject: Vienna Gambit question

On 20 August 2003 (chicagochess2003) wrote in
Message-id:

In an old game against Matanovic the great David Bronstein once tried,
after the standard Vienna Gambit moves 1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.f4 d5, the
unusual 4.d3. This move is trickier than it looks, as the correct
reply is the not so obvious 4...exf4! Bronstein got nothing after
5.exd5 Nxd5 6.Nxd5 Qxd5 7.Bxf4 Bd6 8.Bxd6 Qxd6.

NCO gives this game and line (=/+), and a few other side lines after
4.d3 as well (p. 291). In the line above, it also gives 4.d3 exf4
5.Bxf4 Bb4 =/+. My question is, what if White plays 4.d3 exf4 5.e5?
Given that the alternatives are dismissed as =/+, it seems this
natural pawn thrust is at least worth a mention. Is there any theory
on this line?


4. d3 exf4 5. e5 was played in the game Lombardy-Smylsov, Teesside 1975, where
Smyslov continued with 5...d4!, a move recommended by Max Euwe in Theorie der
Schacheroeffnungen. The game continued with 6. Nce2 Nd5 7. Nxf4 Bb4+ 8. Kf2 Nc6
9. Nf3 0-0 10. Be2 Ne3! 11. Bxe3 dxe3+ 12. Kxe3 (forced since 12. Kg1 Nxe5 13.
Nxe5 Qd4 allows Black to win back the piece with an extra pawn.) 12...Bc5+ 13.
d4 Nxd4! 14. Nxd4 Qg5! 15. c3 Qxe5+ 16. Kf3 Rd8! 17. g3 Bxd4 18. Kg2 Bf5 19.
cxd4 Rxd4 20. Qe1 g5! 21. Bf3 Qxe1 22. Rhe1 gxf4 23. gxf4 Rxf4 and Black, with
two extra pawns, won the endgame 11 moves later.

4. d3, by the way, is a move that originates from Steinitz. It presents no
problems for Black after 4...exf4!, since 5. e5? is met by 5...d4! and both 5.
Bxf4 and 5. exd5 are countered effectively by 5...Bb4.

George Mirijanian



 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.