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Sicilian defense



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 28th 03, 07:15 PM
Sandy Breon
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Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense

I never thought I'd say this, but I am ready to take up the Siclian defense.
After answering 1.e4 with primarily ..e5 (and ..d5 sometimes) as black in
all of my chess games, I want to play actively and counterattack using the
Sicilian defense. So many times with ..e5 I find myself defending for most
of the time versus the Spanish, Italian, and a whole array of gambits all of
the time.

I had always hated the Siclian defense, and even bad-mouthed it. But after
playing against it, and recently taking up the English opening as white, and
exploring and experimenting with many different black defenses to 1.e4
(Pirc, Caro Kann, Philidor, etc), I think that it would be an excellent
defense for unbalanced, active piece play without having to gambit a pawn.
From what I've read the Accelerated Dragon is one of the easiest to
understand and avoids the Yugoslav attack. For all of you Sicilian players
out there, if you can give me any good advice (very brief summaries are
okay) on getting started in the Siclian (a gargantuan task) and handling pet
lines such the the Alapin and Grand Prix attack, I would appreciate it.

Thanks,
Sandy Breon (~1600 blitz ICC)


  #2  
Old August 28th 03, 08:21 PM
Mike Ogush
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense

On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:15:19 GMT, "Sandy Breon"
wrote:

I never thought I'd say this, but I am ready to take up the Siclian defense.
After answering 1.e4 with primarily ..e5 (and ..d5 sometimes) as black in
all of my chess games, I want to play actively and counterattack using the
Sicilian defense. So many times with ..e5 I find myself defending for most
of the time versus the Spanish, Italian, and a whole array of gambits all of
the time.

I had always hated the Siclian defense, and even bad-mouthed it. But after
playing against it, and recently taking up the English opening as white, and
exploring and experimenting with many different black defenses to 1.e4
(Pirc, Caro Kann, Philidor, etc), I think that it would be an excellent
defense for unbalanced, active piece play without having to gambit a pawn.
From what I've read the Accelerated Dragon is one of the easiest to
understand and avoids the Yugoslav attack. For all of you Sicilian players
out there, if you can give me any good advice (very brief summaries are
okay) on getting started in the Siclian (a gargantuan task) and handling pet
lines such the the Alapin and Grand Prix attack, I would appreciate it.

Thanks,
Sandy Breon (~1600 blitz ICC)



I suggest that you start by looking at books that explain the ideas
behind the opening you want to learn. If you have not picked a
specific variation of the Sicilian, then look at "Mastering the
Sicilian", "Starting Out: Sicilian" or an older book by Levy that I
think is titled "How to Play the Sicilian Defense". The first two
should be available an bookstores or on-line; for Levy's book try eBay
or stores that can get out-of-print books.

You may also want to skim through Fine's "ideas Behind the Chess
Openings", which you should be able to find at a local libary. Fine
is somewhat dated regarding specific variations, but the point at this
stage is just to understand the main ideas, which don't change all
that fast.

By reading one of these books you should be able to get some feel for
the types of positions and basic plans in multiple variations and
then you can pick the variation you are most comfortable with.

The next step is to find a repertoire book that covers the variation
you want to learn. For the Accellerated Dragon, I would recommend
Silman's "Wining with the Sicilian Defense, 2nd ed.". It occasionally
shows up on eBay auctions (where I bought my copy).; It also may be
available in some of the on-line book stores.

The advantage of a repertoire book is that the author will usually
show what to do when White tries to avoid the variation (e.g. Alapin,
Closed Sicilian, Grand Prix attack, etc.). Some other books in this
genre for other variations of the Sicilian: "Meeting 1.e4" by Raetsky
(Four Knights var.), "Winning With the Sicilian Dragon 2" by Ward
(Dragon var.), "Play the Najdorf: A Complete Repertoire for Black in
this Most Dynamic of Openings" by Emms (Najdorf var.) For some
variations you may want to look beyond Sicilian repertoire books; "An
Active Repoertoire for Black" by Marovic covers the Scheveningen
variation of the Sicilian (along with the King's Indian). If you
cannot find a repoertoire book at least find a book on your variation
that explains the ideas in more detail and is not just a mass of
variations or annotated games alone.

While you are reading through the repertoire book I recommend that you
also look over a series of articles that Steve Lopez wrote on using
Chessbase and Fritz to to help one learn a new opening. The articles
are available at www.chessbaseusa.com (T-Notes section) or
www.chesbase.com (support section). They are written to specifically
use chessbase products, but many of the techniques work just as well
using less expensive software (e.g. Scid and crafty, which are free).

That should get you started for a long and hopefully successful use of
the the Sicilan.

Mike Ogush




  #3  
Old August 28th 03, 08:39 PM
Sandy Breon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense

Mike,

Thanks for all of the information. Learning a new opening can in fact be a
daunting task, and I think a repertoire book is a good idea. I will
definitely be buying one of those books soon, and go from there. I also saw
an Andrew Martin video advertised on the web on the Accelerated Dragon. Do
you know anything about that?

I am curious, if you have played both the Sicilian and ..e5, and in a
nutshell what you think the major differences are in the two responses to
e4. There has to be a reason that Fischer and Kasparov prefer the Siclian
over ..e5.

Thanks,
Sandy



"Mike Ogush" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:15:19 GMT, "Sandy Breon"
wrote:

I never thought I'd say this, but I am ready to take up the Siclian

defense.
After answering 1.e4 with primarily ..e5 (and ..d5 sometimes) as black in
all of my chess games, I want to play actively and counterattack using

the
Sicilian defense. So many times with ..e5 I find myself defending for

most
of the time versus the Spanish, Italian, and a whole array of gambits all

of
the time.

I had always hated the Siclian defense, and even bad-mouthed it. But

after
playing against it, and recently taking up the English opening as white,

and
exploring and experimenting with many different black defenses to 1.e4
(Pirc, Caro Kann, Philidor, etc), I think that it would be an excellent
defense for unbalanced, active piece play without having to gambit a

pawn.
From what I've read the Accelerated Dragon is one of the easiest to
understand and avoids the Yugoslav attack. For all of you Sicilian

players
out there, if you can give me any good advice (very brief summaries are
okay) on getting started in the Siclian (a gargantuan task) and handling

pet
lines such the the Alapin and Grand Prix attack, I would appreciate it.

Thanks,
Sandy Breon (~1600 blitz ICC)



I suggest that you start by looking at books that explain the ideas
behind the opening you want to learn. If you have not picked a
specific variation of the Sicilian, then look at "Mastering the
Sicilian", "Starting Out: Sicilian" or an older book by Levy that I
think is titled "How to Play the Sicilian Defense". The first two
should be available an bookstores or on-line; for Levy's book try eBay
or stores that can get out-of-print books.

You may also want to skim through Fine's "ideas Behind the Chess
Openings", which you should be able to find at a local libary. Fine
is somewhat dated regarding specific variations, but the point at this
stage is just to understand the main ideas, which don't change all
that fast.

By reading one of these books you should be able to get some feel for
the types of positions and basic plans in multiple variations and
then you can pick the variation you are most comfortable with.

The next step is to find a repertoire book that covers the variation
you want to learn. For the Accellerated Dragon, I would recommend
Silman's "Wining with the Sicilian Defense, 2nd ed.". It occasionally
shows up on eBay auctions (where I bought my copy).; It also may be
available in some of the on-line book stores.

The advantage of a repertoire book is that the author will usually
show what to do when White tries to avoid the variation (e.g. Alapin,
Closed Sicilian, Grand Prix attack, etc.). Some other books in this
genre for other variations of the Sicilian: "Meeting 1.e4" by Raetsky
(Four Knights var.), "Winning With the Sicilian Dragon 2" by Ward
(Dragon var.), "Play the Najdorf: A Complete Repertoire for Black in
this Most Dynamic of Openings" by Emms (Najdorf var.) For some
variations you may want to look beyond Sicilian repertoire books; "An
Active Repoertoire for Black" by Marovic covers the Scheveningen
variation of the Sicilian (along with the King's Indian). If you
cannot find a repoertoire book at least find a book on your variation
that explains the ideas in more detail and is not just a mass of
variations or annotated games alone.

While you are reading through the repertoire book I recommend that you
also look over a series of articles that Steve Lopez wrote on using
Chessbase and Fritz to to help one learn a new opening. The articles
are available at www.chessbaseusa.com (T-Notes section) or
www.chesbase.com (support section). They are written to specifically
use chessbase products, but many of the techniques work just as well
using less expensive software (e.g. Scid and crafty, which are free).

That should get you started for a long and hopefully successful use of
the the Sicilan.

Mike Ogush






  #4  
Old August 28th 03, 09:03 PM
Sandy Breon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense

Antonio,

As usual, your responses are filled with a lot of wisdom, especially the
part about not running away from your weaknesses.

I am curious if you play the Sicilian, and if you do, what do you like about
it?

Thanks again,
Sandy


"Antonio Torrecillas" wrote in message
...
Hello,

some comments added:

En/na Sandy Breon ha escrit:
Antonio,

Thanks for the response. You are probably right about tiring of the

Sicilian
also. ButI still would like to give the Sicilian it a try, though, since

I
have never tried it.


I hope you will enjoy it

Defending an aggressive Italian game is my biggest weakness right now.

When
I tried to play actively with my king's bishop, I used to play it to Bc5
(instead of Be7), but then the bishop is harassed by c3 - d4, or with

the
Evans Gambit. I tried the Two Knights Defense and Traxler variation, the
games are too tactical and wild for me. Now I am using the very passive
Hungarian Defense (..e5, ..Nc6, ..Be7).


I think you must know what happened with your "Italians". If you
discover that you managed them badly or simple you played well but you
losed by some unafortunated mistakes that will show you about your own
style and weaknesses which is thw way to improve in chess.

I am looking for active, positional piece play, and when I looked at the
Accelerated Dragon, it looked like what I was looking for in an opening.


Excuse-me if I repeat arguments but white can also (in Sicilian) use
some lines where you will be unconfortable. But you must not avoid them.
Fighting versus them you will learn a lot about your chess skills.

Antonio



  #5  
Old August 28th 03, 10:05 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense

Hello,

I have played mainly Alekhine Defence and French but I have played some
Dragon sicilian, some Classical Sicilian, a few Najdorf Sicilian and a
few Taimanov Sicilian.

I have one sicilian game in NCO -Nunn Chess Openings. (I discovered it
recently).

My feelings about Sicilian are that it gives a lot of funny games but my
main problem is that Sicilian need too many hours of study. I play it
only as a surprise weapon

Antonio Torrecillas

En/na Sandy Breon ha escrit:
Antonio,

As usual, your responses are filled with a lot of wisdom, especially the
part about not running away from your weaknesses.

I am curious if you play the Sicilian, and if you do, what do you like about
it?

Thanks again,
Sandy


  #6  
Old August 28th 03, 10:56 PM
Sandy Breon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense

I have played mainly Alekhine Defence and French but I have played some
Dragon sicilian, some Classical Sicilian, a few Najdorf Sicilian and a
few Taimanov Sicilian.


That is a very good variety. By the way, is the idea of Alekhine Defense to
overextend the white pawns and then attack them? I don't think that I have
enough experience yet to use that defense yet. Maybe some day.

I have one sicilian game in NCO -Nunn Chess Openings. (I discovered it
recently).


Cool!

My feelings about Sicilian are that it gives a lot of funny games but my
main problem is that Sicilian need too many hours of study. I play it
only as a surprise weapon


Hopefully I can avoid a lot of study in the open Sicilians (no regular
Dragon, Classical, Najdorf, etc.) by just learning the Accelerated Dragon.
However, I will still have to be able to handle closed Sicilians and
anti-Sicilians systems. I will probably test it in blitz for a few months,
then maybe use it in an OTB tournament.

Sandy



  #7  
Old August 29th 03, 03:25 AM
Mike Ogush
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense

On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 18:39:04 GMT, "Sandy Breon"
wrote:

Mike,

Thanks for all of the information. Learning a new opening can in fact be a
daunting task, and I think a repertoire book is a good idea. I will
definitely be buying one of those books soon, and go from there. I also saw
an Andrew Martin video advertised on the web on the Accelerated Dragon. Do
you know anything about that?


I don't know about that specific video. You might try searching the
web to find out if anyone has reviewed it.

I am curious, if you have played both the Sicilian and ..e5, and in a
nutshell what you think the major differences are in the two responses to
e4. There has to be a reason that Fischer and Kasparov prefer the Siclian
over ..e5.


Yes I have played the Sicilian (Dragon Variation) and 1...e5 going for
the Open variation of the Spanish. I actually did the reverse of what
you are planning. I started with the Sicilian Dragon and found myself
getting positions I didn't like when White played classical varations,
especially with Bg5. At the time I was probably between 1700 and 1900
USCF. I decided to try 1...e5 and play more classically.

The main difference between the Sicilian and Open Games is that in the
Sicilian Black almost always counter attacks on the queen-side, while
in open games Black has more opportunities to attack on the king side
himself. Also in many open games that I had White would gambit one or
more pawns for the initiative or attack and I would just have to
patiently defend and win the ending.

Mike

Thanks,
Sandy



"Mike Ogush" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 17:15:19 GMT, "Sandy Breon"
wrote:

I never thought I'd say this, but I am ready to take up the Siclian

defense.
After answering 1.e4 with primarily ..e5 (and ..d5 sometimes) as black in
all of my chess games, I want to play actively and counterattack using

the
Sicilian defense. So many times with ..e5 I find myself defending for

most
of the time versus the Spanish, Italian, and a whole array of gambits all

of
the time.

I had always hated the Siclian defense, and even bad-mouthed it. But

after
playing against it, and recently taking up the English opening as white,

and
exploring and experimenting with many different black defenses to 1.e4
(Pirc, Caro Kann, Philidor, etc), I think that it would be an excellent
defense for unbalanced, active piece play without having to gambit a

pawn.
From what I've read the Accelerated Dragon is one of the easiest to
understand and avoids the Yugoslav attack. For all of you Sicilian

players
out there, if you can give me any good advice (very brief summaries are
okay) on getting started in the Siclian (a gargantuan task) and handling

pet
lines such the the Alapin and Grand Prix attack, I would appreciate it.

Thanks,
Sandy Breon (~1600 blitz ICC)



I suggest that you start by looking at books that explain the ideas
behind the opening you want to learn. If you have not picked a
specific variation of the Sicilian, then look at "Mastering the
Sicilian", "Starting Out: Sicilian" or an older book by Levy that I
think is titled "How to Play the Sicilian Defense". The first two
should be available an bookstores or on-line; for Levy's book try eBay
or stores that can get out-of-print books.

You may also want to skim through Fine's "ideas Behind the Chess
Openings", which you should be able to find at a local libary. Fine
is somewhat dated regarding specific variations, but the point at this
stage is just to understand the main ideas, which don't change all
that fast.

By reading one of these books you should be able to get some feel for
the types of positions and basic plans in multiple variations and
then you can pick the variation you are most comfortable with.

The next step is to find a repertoire book that covers the variation
you want to learn. For the Accellerated Dragon, I would recommend
Silman's "Wining with the Sicilian Defense, 2nd ed.". It occasionally
shows up on eBay auctions (where I bought my copy).; It also may be
available in some of the on-line book stores.

The advantage of a repertoire book is that the author will usually
show what to do when White tries to avoid the variation (e.g. Alapin,
Closed Sicilian, Grand Prix attack, etc.). Some other books in this
genre for other variations of the Sicilian: "Meeting 1.e4" by Raetsky
(Four Knights var.), "Winning With the Sicilian Dragon 2" by Ward
(Dragon var.), "Play the Najdorf: A Complete Repertoire for Black in
this Most Dynamic of Openings" by Emms (Najdorf var.) For some
variations you may want to look beyond Sicilian repertoire books; "An
Active Repoertoire for Black" by Marovic covers the Scheveningen
variation of the Sicilian (along with the King's Indian). If you
cannot find a repoertoire book at least find a book on your variation
that explains the ideas in more detail and is not just a mass of
variations or annotated games alone.

While you are reading through the repertoire book I recommend that you
also look over a series of articles that Steve Lopez wrote on using
Chessbase and Fritz to to help one learn a new opening. The articles
are available at www.chessbaseusa.com (T-Notes section) or
www.chesbase.com (support section). They are written to specifically
use chessbase products, but many of the techniques work just as well
using less expensive software (e.g. Scid and crafty, which are free).

That should get you started for a long and hopefully successful use of
the the Sicilan.

Mike Ogush







  #8  
Old August 29th 03, 02:23 PM
Sandy Breon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense


Yes I have played the Sicilian (Dragon Variation) and 1...e5 going for
the Open variation of the Spanish. I actually did the reverse of what
you are planning. I started with the Sicilian Dragon and found myself
getting positions I didn't like when White played classical varations,
especially with Bg5. At the time I was probably between 1700 and 1900
USCF. I decided to try 1...e5 and play more classically.


The classic case where the grass is always greener on the other side of the
fence. Antonio also mentioned this too in his post. The good news I think
with changing your openings is that it prevents boredom, plus it allows you
to improve by playing different positions.

The main difference between the Sicilian and Open Games is that in the
Sicilian Black almost always counter attacks on the queen-side, while
in open games Black has more opportunities to attack on the king side
himself. Also in many open games that I had White would gambit one or
more pawns for the initiative or attack and I would just have to
patiently defend and win the ending.


I played some Sicilian games as black last night in blitz, and man is it
fun! Games are very double-edged, although I probably lost more than I won.
My very first Sicilian game last night was against the the Morra Gambit!
Losing some games was to be expected the first time that I ever played the
Sicilian competitively with the black pieces.

Thanks,
Sandy



  #9  
Old August 29th 03, 04:51 PM
Kym
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense


"Sandy Breon" wrote in message t...
I have played mainly Alekhine Defence and French but I have played some
Dragon sicilian, some Classical Sicilian, a few Najdorf Sicilian and a
few Taimanov Sicilian.


That is a very good variety. By the way, is the idea of Alekhine Defense to
overextend the white pawns and then attack them? I don't think that I have
enough experience yet to use that defense yet. Maybe some day.

Interesting. I play Alekhine OTB and Corr. Have started playing
Scicilian in Corr. because it is a good way to get a feel for an
opening and memorise some lines before going OTB.
I have tried acc. dragon, but seem to not like the Maroczy Bind after c4.

Alekhine is tricky but fun. I consider it a big con job in the
sense that white thinks they are winning for 3/4 of the game
until their pawn structure is broken and black has a q side passed pawn.
Alekhine: "Come into my parlour" said the spider to the fly.
You do need to have clear book work for Alekhine.


  #10  
Old August 29th 03, 07:12 PM
Dc Gentle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sicilian defense


Hi,

Apropos Morra Gambit!
Have you seen the ongoing game here in this group?
(Thread "Morra gambit game (2nd edition)")
There is more behind the Morra than people think,
in my opinion it has been mishandled by white too often.
If being played correctly, the Morra can make black suffer,
so beware ;-)

(I am still seeking another one to make the 3rd move
against me playing white in a (computer-aided) E-mail game
with the start sequence 1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. c3))

Take care,
DC

"Sandy Breon" wrote:

I played some Sicilian games as black last night in blitz, and man is it
fun! Games are very double-edged, although I probably lost more than I

won.
My very first Sicilian game last night was against the the Morra Gambit!
Losing some games was to be expected the first time that I ever played the
Sicilian competitively with the black pieces.



 




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