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Always stuck after the opening...



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 2nd 03, 10:54 AM
Alexander Fischer
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

Hi all,

I seem to be stuck in my progress on playing chess. Very often I encounter
the problem, that after a decent opening, which maybe even left me with an
advantage, I don't know how to proceed. This is especially the case if there
seem to be no possibilities for tactical gains - I'm just lacking a plan.

Take this as an example, me playing white:

2r1r1k1/pp1b1ppp/2n5/3p2qn/3P4/2PB1Q1P/PPN2PPB/R4RK1 w - - 0 17

Ok, my pawns on the queen side are stronger than the opponents. D5 might be
a weak point, but I can't attack it with my bishop. If I move c3, d4 becomes
weak. On the other hand, I'm threatened on the king side by the bishop,
knight and queen, which may and probably will at some point - when I become
careless - dangerous. Probably, my next move would be Rfe1, with the hope of
exchanging enough pieces that we reach an endgame, in which I again seem to
be more comfortable.

Any hints on ways to improve my thinking in this - I believe - positional
playing phase will be greatly appreciated!!

Alex


  #2  
Old September 2nd 03, 03:03 PM
Andreas Walkenhorst
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

On Tue, 2 Sep 2003 11:54:51 +0200, "Alexander Fischer"
wrote:

Hi all,

Take this as an example, me playing white:

2r1r1k1/pp1b1ppp/2n5/3p2qn/3P4/2PB1Q1P/PPN2PPB/R4RK1 w - - 0 17


....some ideas, but this may be superficial, as I only invested less
than 5 minutes ...

Structures
- Looks like a Caro-Kann exchange or London System, though I have no
idea where the black e-pawn may have been gone ...
- Only one open file. If you do not like to use it you should lessen
its influense a little, and could exchange one pair of rooks (not
both!).
- The black d pawn is potentially weak.
- The position of the white knight on c2 should be improved.

Black does not have any real threats on the kingside. I guess that
this wing - combined with threats against the black pawn on d5 is
white's battleground. Black only may have some ideas around a
minority-attack on the queenside, and using the e-file.

White's tasks: Taking care on the e-file. Re1 could be an idea. After
an exchange of one pair of rooks Ne3 and another guy is attacking d5.
If now black is forced to close the e-file with lets say Be6,
there may be some ideas around g4, Bf4, and Ng2
and then black has problems in the center and on the kingsdie

Concerning the planning: I guess many people have similar problems.
They know some moves, and then a book (or ECO) tell +/=, but they have
no idea what to do.
I recommend 2 things to avoid that:

- If you play a repertoire (which I strongly recommend), you should
play through games from the *heavy weights* with the opening. best is
that those heavyweights commented that games.

- Try to find out typical plans for some well known pawn structures
(or get you a book about that topic, an example may be - for the
french defense - "Mastering the french" by Macdonald & Harley).

Andreas

  #3  
Old September 2nd 03, 03:42 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

En/na Alexander Fischer ha escrit:
2r1r1k1/pp1b1ppp/2n5/3p2qn/3P4/2PB1Q1P/PPN2PPB/R4RK1 w - - 0 17

Ok, my pawns on the queen side are stronger than the opponents. D5 might be
a weak point, but I can't attack it with my bishop. If I move c3, d4 becomes
weak. On the other hand, I'm threatened on the king side by the bishop,
knight and queen, which may and probably will at some point - when I become
careless - dangerous. Probably, my next move would be Rfe1, with the hope of
exchanging enough pieces that we reach an endgame, in which I again seem to
be more comfortable.

Any hints on ways to improve my thinking in this - I believe - positional
playing phase will be greatly appreciated!!

Alex


This position is an easy win (for me). White is a pawn up, has better
pawn structure and has better pieces.

I think there is no secret, the way to master much position is simply
"hard work". If you analize this position and find interesting plans and
tactical motivs, you could apply them in another similar positions.

In that case, I know that proposing piece exchanges the ending is almost
ever won for white. I know too that d5 pawn is a problem for black now
and in the future. I know that pair of white bishops have seem stronger
than black pieces. I know that there is not piece unbalance enough to
black for starting an attack in king wing. ...

I will choose between two plans:
- Ne3, Rfe1, Re2, Rae1 reinforcing my position. Maybe then add more
pressure to d5 (Bc2-b3) or maybe prepare b3, c4 or maybe some Ne3 move
.... that depend on black setup.
- Ne3, Rae1, and if e4 is controlled (I need to calculate accurately),
g4, Qg2, f4-f5 with a pawn storm in king wing which is specially strong
if black has choosed ...Be6)

Those ideas are from my experience. If you work hard you will find plans
easier. I heard an Spanish Gm saying "as I more study, I'm more lucky
because my opponents make more mistakes.

AT

  #4  
Old September 2nd 03, 04:28 PM
Claus-Jürgen Heigl
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

Alexander Fischer wrote:

2r1r1k1/pp1b1ppp/2n5/3p2qn/3P4/2PB1Q1P/PPN2PPB/R4RK1 w - - 0 17

Features of this position a

pawn plus for White, bishop pair vs. knight pair, open e-file,
weak d5, possible outpost for White on e5 or c5, possible outpost
for Black on e4 or c4.

Your plans for White should be: simplify the position, so that the
bishops have more strength. Fight for the e-file and try to establish
a knight outpost on e5. Behind the Ne5 you could build up on the
e-file.

If Black is just waiting, your plan would be: placing a knight on
e5, doubling the rooks on the e-file, make room for the knight
so it could retreat to d3, using e5 for the rook, c5 for the knight.

Black has basically two active plans: attack on the kingside with
Nc6-e7-g6-h4 or a minority attack against c3 with b7-b5-b4. Both
plans need some time to accomplish. Black would also like to establish
a knight on e4.

A route for the white knight could be Nc2-e3-g4-e5. From e3 the
knight could also go to f5 (target d6) or supporting the bishop
going to f5, or supporting the pawn thrust c4.

The candidate moves would be Rfe1, Rae1, Ne3. On 1. Rfe1 Rxe1
2. Rxe1 Nf6 3. Ne3 Re8 the Ne3 is pinned. It´s not a real problem
because White can unpin with 4. Re2 but still I´d prefer my pieces
covered.

1. Ne3 attacks d5, so Black has two viable answers: 1...Be6 and
1...Ne7. 1...Nf6 doesn´t work because of 2. Bf4 Qh4 3. Bf5 Bxf5
(3...Be6 4. g3 Qh5 5. g4 costs a piece to save the queen) 4. Nxf5
Qh5 5. Nd6 and White wins the exchange.

1...Ne7 (Black controls f5 now) 2. Ng4 (continues the journey to e5)
2...Bxg4 (trying to trade bishops with 2...Bf5 is met by 3. Ne5 Bxd3
4. Qxf7+) 3. Qxg4 (simplifying) Qxg4 4. hxg4 Nf6 5. f3. White denies
the knights squares in the center, and plans to roll his d-pawn.

1...Be6 2. Ng4 (with the same plan as above) 2...Ne7 (plan Ng6; other
moves: 2...Bxg4 3. Qxg4 Qxg4 4. hxg4 Nf6 5. f3 allows 5...Re3 but it
doesn´t matter: 6. Rad1 Rce8 7. Kf2 and White will get his rook on the
e-file. After 2...Na5 (plan Nc4) White simply plays 3. Ne5 and if
3...f6
4. Rfe1 and Black can´t take the knight, for 4...fxe5 5. Rxe5 Qd2
6. Rd1 Qxb2 7. Qxh5 g6 8. Bxg6 initiates a deadly attack.) 3. Ne5
Ng6 (threat Nh4) 4. Nxg6 fxg6 5. Rae1 (plan Re5) Rf8 6. Qe3
(simplifying) 6...Qxe3 7. Rxe3 Bf5 8. Bb5. White has a pawn more,
the bishops pair and controls the e-file. Here White would aim to
invade the 7th rank, attacking the queenside and d5 from all sides
(Bb3, Rd7, Re5).

Overall: before you take comitting action, you should improve your
pieces as much as you can. In the starting position, the rooks and
the knight are not on good squares. The bishops are good, but with
fewer pieces obstructing them they would be even better. You should
look where your pieces have more effect and if there is a way to get
there. Of course you should also consider what your opponent is up to.
The material advantage is not big enough to play an immediate role,
but it´s important in an endgame.

Claus-Juergen
  #5  
Old September 2nd 03, 04:59 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

En/na Claus-Jürgen Heigl ha escrit:
Features of this position a
(..)
The candidate moves would be Rfe1, Rae1, Ne3. (...)

Claus-Juergen


Hello,

This is not only a plan, it seems a complete analysis of the position
done by a very strong player (a good IM or a GM).

This is not the first time I feel this. I do not find any Heigl in FIDE
list. In my database there are only Rita and Rudolf Heigl -apart of your
sim game with Pachman you published here-

Is Claus-Jurgen Heigl a pseudonim?
I can not accept you are not an strong player!

Thanks
Antonio Torrecillas

  #6  
Old September 2nd 03, 05:01 PM
mdamien
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

"Alexander Fischer" wrote in message
...
Hi all,

I seem to be stuck in my progress on playing chess. Very often I encounter
the problem, that after a decent opening, which maybe even left me with an
advantage, I don't know how to proceed. This is especially the case if

there
seem to be no possibilities for tactical gains - I'm just lacking a plan.

Take this as an example, me playing white:

2r1r1k1/pp1b1ppp/2n5/3p2qn/3P4/2PB1Q1P/PPN2PPB/R4RK1 w - - 0 17

Ok, my pawns on the queen side are stronger than the opponents. D5 might

be
a weak point, but I can't attack it with my bishop. If I move c3, d4

becomes
weak. On the other hand, I'm threatened on the king side by the bishop,
knight and queen, which may and probably will at some point - when I

become
careless - dangerous. Probably, my next move would be Rfe1, with the hope

of
exchanging enough pieces that we reach an endgame, in which I again seem

to
be more comfortable.

Any hints on ways to improve my thinking in this - I believe - positional
playing phase will be greatly appreciated!!


You are up a pawn, and it seems a good plan to have an eye toward the
endgame -- the basic rule of thumb being, when you're up material, trade
pieces rather than pawns. You want to watch for any situations, especially,
where you might end up with bishops of opposite color, or you each have a
single rook with pawns on one side of the board, as your extra material
probably won't amount to much then. So ... since Black is now holding the e
file, it's a good general idea to contest that and trade off rooks. I'd
probably be thinking Rae1 rather than Rfe1 -- while it would seem to break
the standard of moving the rook that will leave the *other* rook more
options, in this case (since you're looking to trade off) I figure why let
Black take the rook with check? Probably doesn't matter too much in this
case though, I'll agree, since it wouldn't be in Black's interest to trade
the rook.

Your queen is tied down to the defense of h3 (and your whole kingside,
actually), since Black's queen is pinning the pawn at g2. So, the move Kh1
presents itself, breaking the pin.

Black's queen can penetrate to d2. There's no future for her there right
now, but again, something to keep in mind. For instance, if you're looking
at the pretty forcing: 1. Rae1 Nf6 2. Rxe8+ Rxe8 3. Re1 Rxe1+ 4. Nxe1, you'd
have to deal with the queen's invasion at d2 or c1. In either case, you can
actually answer effectively with Qe2, so maybe that's not such a bad route
after all. Of course, you could also block the queen's diagonal with Ne3,
putting pressure on the pawn at d5. I think I'd try to get some material off
the board first though, as Black can overprotect d5 with everything in his
camp. Probably, if Black were to play 1. ... Nf6, you could follow up with
2. Bf4 and then really simplify things: 2. ... Qh5 3. Qxh5 Nxh5 4. Bd2, with
something like 4. ... Nf6 5. Rxe8+ Rxe8 6. Re1 Rxe1+ 7. Nxe1, and where is
Black going to find any counterplay in that scenario? With the heavy
artillery gone, even the prospects of a minority attack (otherwise perhaps
Black's best plan?) are gone.

Just some casual thoughts.

Matt




  #7  
Old September 2nd 03, 05:02 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

En/na Antonio Torrecillas ha escrit:
Hello,

This is not only a plan, it seems a complete analysis of the position
done by a very strong player (a good IM or a GM).

This is not the first time I feel this. I do not find any Heigl in FIDE
list. In my database there are only Rita and Rudolf Heigl -apart of your
sim game with Pachman you published here-

Is Claus-Jurgen Heigl a pseudonim?
I can not accept you are not an strong player!

Thanks
Antonio Torrecillas


A correction: Rudolf Heigl has FIDE rating but He is inactive.

AT

  #8  
Old September 2nd 03, 10:17 PM
CeeBee
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

"Alexander Fischer" wrote in
rec.games.chess.analysis:

Hi all,

I seem to be stuck in my progress on playing chess. Very often I
encounter the problem, that after a decent opening, which maybe even
left me with an advantage, I don't know how to proceed. This is
especially the case if there seem to be no possibilities for tactical
gains - I'm just lacking a plan.



If you choose an opening, you choose a plan. If you choose a plan,
execute it.

Looking at the position you provide of course is useful, but will it
help you in the next situation, or will you end up with another clueless
situation to be anaylsed?

I don't know what your strength is, so I'm not targeting you, but it's
more of a general observation.

Look at the postings in this newsgroup. The bulk is about petty moves in
almost every opening you can imagine. Most chess players are more
concerned with "is 17...Nh5 sound?" than with executing a plan,
recognising standard tactical situations or mastering basic endgames. I
guess there are quite a few here who have problems mastering a simple KR
against K mate, but are seriously wondering if they should go for the
Dingdong variation of the Hotzenflotz after 34.Qd2 or for the Djingboom
Defence without 78.Rd8.

Of course you shouldn't leave opening theory behind. But you could
change your attitude against openings: as a way to a situation you
prefer, and not as an isolated part of the game, "the part before the
middlegame".

Maybe you should rebuild your opening repertoire from point zero, from
the perspective of white and black and each time ask yourself: if my
opponent makes this choice, which way will I progress? What do I want
for development with my light pieces, with my rooks, on the king- or
queenside?
Build a small and solid repertoire and practice that, and try to play
out the development in the middle game that you initiated in the
opening.

It's well known what the secret of the strong chess player is: superior
pattern recognition and knowing what to do in a position.

Tactical exercises give would training in those patterns. Try to
identify them by name: it makes it more easy to remember them on te
board. If you see a position and define it as "compromised king safety"
or "annihilation of the pawn structure" you'll give your tactics and
strategics a name. And we all know that it's tactics that decide a game
in 90% of all cases.

Additionally you could pick up correspondence chess, which give you the
opportunity to take more time per move, and discover how to make your
planes work.

And of course you have the modern day equivalent of the chess slave: the
computer chess program. It will allow you to play games over and over
again with the same variations, and point out every flaw in your ideas.

--
CeeBee


Uxbridge: "By God, sir, I've lost my leg!"
Wellington: "By God, sir, so you have!"


Google CeeBee @ www.geocities.com/ceebee_2

  #9  
Old September 3rd 03, 12:03 AM
Joe Schoeman
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Default Always stuck after the opening...

Couldn't have said it better myself, CeeBee, so I won't even try.

Joe


 




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