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How much do chess books actually cost???



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 4th 03, 05:16 AM
Ivan
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Default How much do chess books actually cost???

I went to my local Barnes and Nobles bookstore and found that the new
kasparov book (My Great Predecessors VOL. 1) cost $35.00 on the cover.
So I decided to search the Internet to find better prices.
I then went to chesscafe.com and found it selling for 33.95 .
I visited Amazon and found the book selling at $24.50 . Finally I
went chessusa.com and found the same book selling for 29.75 .

Now all these business have to be making some profit or else they
would not be selling a book with $35 cover price at a lower price. I
was curious how much money a book such as this cost the publisher to
make and sells to vendors. And how much they make as being the
"middle man." also, I guess Kasparov gets 1 or 2 dollars per book
for royalties.

It does not stop here either. So many opening guides are prices over
$20 and some of them I think are a waste because it is mostly computer
generated analysis. I don't think chess players are going pay $20+
for a book so that they can memorize lines 30 moves deep. But
everybody is different so I can't be the judge of that.
  #2  
Old September 4th 03, 02:09 PM
Flobby Bischer
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Default How much do chess books actually cost???

Typically, and Kasparov may be an exception because of his international
standing, but typically the writer does not receive
any royalties until a certain number of books are sold, often in the range
of 3000. Often the write is lucky to achieve this figure. I know my own
book sold slightly under 3000 and then was remaindered. I know another
whose great book did about the same and he has no plans, unfortunately, in
the future to write another. (a GM no less). It's a tough market for those
who don't hit it big and lucky.

Still one must thank the writers and the publishers for believing in the
subject enough to actually get one out there.

I agree with you, books of computer generated analysis are not worth it.



  #3  
Old September 4th 03, 07:05 PM
Neil Cerutti
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Default How much do chess books actually cost???

In article , Bill Wong wrote:
I worked for a book store at the beach this summer and their
discount from the VENDOR was roughly 40%.--Bill Wong


I've seen it described as the 50-50-50 rule of thumb. You
hopefully fix your price at 50 percent of the printing cost. 50
percent of the remaining profit goes to the distributor, and then
50 percent of what's left after that goes to the seller.

So, for a $35 book, roughly:
$17.50 is printing costs (it may be even more for small run items like
Chess books)
$8.75 is distribution costs
$4.38 goes to the store that sells the book
$4.37 is split between royalties for the author(s), and promotion costs.

--
Neil Cerutti
  #4  
Old September 4th 03, 08:19 PM
Neil Cerutti
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Default How much do chess books actually cost???

In article , Paul Rubin wrote:
Neil Cerutti writes:
I've seen it described as the 50-50-50 rule of thumb. You
hopefully fix your price at 50 percent of the printing cost. 50
percent of the remaining profit goes to the distributor, and then
50 percent of what's left after that goes to the seller.

So, for a $35 book, roughly:
$17.50 is printing costs (it may be even more for small run items like
Chess books)
$8.75 is distribution costs
$4.38 goes to the store that sells the book
$4.37 is split between royalties for the author(s), and promotion costs.


No that's backwards. For the $35 book, $17.50 goes to the bookseller,
$8.75 to distribution, $4.38 to the author and $4.38 to the printer.


Thanks for the correction.

--
Neil Cerutti
  #5  
Old September 5th 03, 12:45 AM
Sam Sloan
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Default How much do chess books actually cost???

On 4 Sep 2003 18:05:31 GMT, Neil Cerutti wrote:

In article , Bill Wong wrote:
I worked for a book store at the beach this summer and their
discount from the VENDOR was roughly 40%.--Bill Wong


I've seen it described as the 50-50-50 rule of thumb. You
hopefully fix your price at 50 percent of the printing cost. 50
percent of the remaining profit goes to the distributor, and then
50 percent of what's left after that goes to the seller.

So, for a $35 book, roughly:
$17.50 is printing costs (it may be even more for small run items like
Chess books)
$8.75 is distribution costs
$4.38 goes to the store that sells the book
$4.37 is split between royalties for the author(s), and promotion costs.

--
Neil Cerutti


You are all wet. This is completely wrong. Where do you get your
information from?

Sam Sloan

  #6  
Old September 5th 03, 12:46 AM
Sam Sloan
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Posts: n/a
Default How much do chess books actually cost???

On 04 Sep 2003 11:44:31 -0700, Paul Rubin
wrote:

Neil Cerutti writes:
I've seen it described as the 50-50-50 rule of thumb. You
hopefully fix your price at 50 percent of the printing cost. 50
percent of the remaining profit goes to the distributor, and then
50 percent of what's left after that goes to the seller.

So, for a $35 book, roughly:
$17.50 is printing costs (it may be even more for small run items like
Chess books)
$8.75 is distribution costs
$4.38 goes to the store that sells the book
$4.37 is split between royalties for the author(s), and promotion costs.


No that's backwards. For the $35 book, $17.50 goes to the bookseller,
$8.75 to distribution, $4.38 to the author and $4.38 to the printer.


Yes. That is better.

Sam Sloan
  #7  
Old September 6th 03, 10:03 AM
Kym
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Posts: n/a
Default How much do chess books actually cost???

I did some work for a publisher a few years ago.
Part of the system we developed included a stock write down module.
This write down schedule is based on original retail price.
25% 3 months.
60% 6 months.
85% 9 months.
Dump to disposals at 12 months. (usually 95%).

In other words, publishers try and sell it all in the 1st 3 months.
Stock holding (warehouse) costs mean if it does not move, get rid of it.

"Ivan" wrote in message om...
I went to my local Barnes and Nobles bookstore and found that the new
kasparov book (My Great Predecessors VOL. 1) cost $35.00 on the cover.
So I decided to search the Internet to find better prices.
I then went to chesscafe.com and found it selling for 33.95 .
I visited Amazon and found the book selling at $24.50 . Finally I
went chessusa.com and found the same book selling for 29.75 .

Now all these business have to be making some profit or else they
would not be selling a book with $35 cover price at a lower price. I
was curious how much money a book such as this cost the publisher to
make and sells to vendors. And how much they make as being the
"middle man." also, I guess Kasparov gets 1 or 2 dollars per book
for royalties.

It does not stop here either. So many opening guides are prices over
$20 and some of them I think are a waste because it is mostly computer
generated analysis. I don't think chess players are going pay $20+
for a book so that they can memorize lines 30 moves deep. But
everybody is different so I can't be the judge of that.



  #8  
Old September 6th 03, 06:07 PM
Mike Nolan
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Posts: n/a
Default How much do chess books actually cost???

"Kym" writes:

In other words, publishers try and sell it all in the 1st 3 months.
Stock holding (warehouse) costs mean if it does not move, get rid of it.


Publishing is a very diverse enterprise. Mass market paperbacks, which is
what Kym is apparently describing, have a fairly short shelf life. I know
readers who will hit the bookstores on a given day every month when the
new shipment of Harlequin romances comes in, and buy a copy of every
new title.

However, reference books sell for a much longer period of time, often with
a smaller and less frenetic initial sales period.

Executives at Bobbs-Merrill refer to "THE JOY OF COOKING" as 'the franchise',
because that book has sold consistently well for OVER FIVE DECADES. I
suspect that well over half of the kitchens in the USA have at least one
copy of it. (I think we have at least three different editions of it
in our kitchen.)

Textbooks are yet another different market. Most textbooks have a sales
life of 5-7 years before they are either dropped or revised for a new edition.
However, I also know of some math textbooks that have remained in their current
edition for over two decades.

Are chess books more like mass market paperback books or textbooks, or
reference books?
--
Mike Nolan
 




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