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Why I hate Edward Lasker



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 24th 08, 09:40 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.analysis
samsloan
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Posts: 14,869
Default Why I hate Edward Lasker

Why I hate Edward Lasker

The Flea House, the commonly known name for The Chess and Checker Club
of New York, which was next to the New Amsterdam Theater on 42nd
Street near the south-west corner with Broadway, closed in about 1970,
although nobody can remember exactly when, and then the main chess
scene moved up to Charlie Hidalgo's Chess House on 72nd Street between
Broadway and Columbus on the north side of the street.

This was a better neighborhood and several wealthy stockbrokers and
important people lived nearby. Edward Lasker and Reuben Fine also
lived near there. Lasker came to the club almost every day. Reuben
Fine visited there too, but rarely.

I had the greatest respect for Edward Lasker, because when I was a
little boy, the very first book I had read in my entire life was not
Fun With Dick and Jane, but was Chess for Fun and Chess for Blood by
Edward Lasker.

One day in about 1971, while hanging out at the Chess House on 72nd
Street, Edward Lasker challenged me to a game of chess. I sat down to
play him. Facing the front door, I was sitting at the first table near
the front door on the left hand side of the central corridor.

Some months before this, I had spotted Reuben Fine standing on the
second floor near the top of the stairways. I had approached him and
asked him if he would like to play a game of chess. “Are you Browne?”,
asked Reuben Fine. I replied that I was not Walter Browne, I was just
an expert. Reuben Fine responded that he was not interested in playing
me.

So, on this occasion, I was playing Edward Lasker. Lasker had been a
great player and had won the US Open Chess Championship seven times
before 1920. However, he was born in 1885, so by 1971 he was 86 years
old and no longer the player he once was.

So, I was playing Edward Lasker with the black pieces, but he was
really no match for me. Soon, I was a piece up with queens off the
board and my pieces were swarming in for checkmate.

Then, Edward Lasker stopped moving. He just sat, and sat and sat,
staring at his busted, hopeless position. He would still move
occasionally but only once every ten minutes or so, even though this
was a skittles game.

Now, at just this moment, who should walk in the door but Reuben
Fine!!! Standing at the front door, Reuben Fine declared that he
wanted to play chess with anybody, anybody at all.

I had never seen Reuben Fine do this before. Here was my big chance to
play the great man, one of the strongest chess players in the world.
Unfortunately, I was stuck in this never-ending game with Edward
Lasker.

The people at the front door knew who Reuben Fine was, so they went
looking for Charlie Hidalgo, the owner of the place. Charlie was an
expert. I feel that Charlie was slightly better than me, but we were
about equal. The problem was that Charlie was crazy. By this, I do not
mean to say that Charlie was nuts. Rather, I mean to say that Charlie
was INSANE.

The building in which the Chess House was located was owned by his
brother, Otto Hidalgo. Otto Hidalgo was a big time Wall Street real
estate broker with Ely Cruikshank Co. Otto had done me a favor by
renting me my first securities broker-dealer office at 120 Liberty
Street. Otto was letting Charlie Hidalgo operate a chess club in the
building owned by Otto.

Charlie Hidalgo was found in the back of the club, probably babbling
to himself in one of his schizophrenic tirades, and brought to the
front and sat down to play Reuben Fine.

They were playing on the same row as me. Just across the center isle,
only two boards away from where I was still playing Edward Lasker, who
still had not yet moved.

A big crowd gathered around the game to watch. I could not see
anything. I could see that they were playing five minute chess and
punching the clock, but I could not see through the crowd any of the
actual moves.

Finally, after about 20 minutes or so, after they had played several
games, Reuben Fine got up and walked out the door.

Meanwhile, Edward Lasker still had not moved.

Finally, I got angry. Eventually, Edward Lasker moved and I replied
instantly. After a few more instant moves, I started blundering and
lost the game.

I then went looking for the players who had witnessed the games. I
asked them what the results of the games were, who had won, what
openings had been played and so on. Unfortunately, it turned out that
the actual spectators had been so weak at chess that they did not even
who had won the games, much less what openings had been played or
anything else about the games.

So, finally, I found Charlie, sitting in the back of the club. “Who
won the games, Charlie?”, I asked.

Charlie just sat their babbling in his incoherent style, “Yea Yea Yea
Yada Yada Yada”, said Charlie Hidalgo. It was impossible to get any
information out of him at all.

That was the last time I ever saw Reuben Fine come to the club.

The significance of this? After famously declining to play in the 1948
World Chess Championship tournament in The Hague and Moscow, Reuben
Fine had played in only one more tournament, that being in 1951. He
has one skittles game he played against Bobby Fischer in 1963 which is
in the book “My 60 Memorable Games” by Bobby Fischer. If I had played
those games against Reuben Fine on that day in 1971 or even seen him
playing Charlie Hidalgo, I would have remembered the games, written
them down, published them, and then they would have become part of
chess history.

Instead, I did not get to play Reuben Fine or even to see him play,
because Edward Lasker refused to move.

Now you understand why I hate Edward Lasker.

Sam Sloan
  #2  
Old July 25th 08, 02:46 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.analysis
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 798
Default Why I hate Edward Lasker

On Jul 24, 4:40*pm, samsloan wrote:
Why I hate Edward Lasker

The Flea House, the commonly known name for The Chess and Checker Club
of New York, which was next to the New Amsterdam Theater on 42nd
Street near the south-west corner with Broadway, closed in about 1970,
although nobody can remember exactly when, and then the main chess
scene moved up to Charlie Hidalgo's Chess House on 72nd Street between
Broadway and Columbus on the north side of the street.

This was a better neighborhood and several wealthy stockbrokers and
important people lived nearby. Edward Lasker and Reuben Fine also
lived near there. Lasker came to the club almost every day. Reuben
Fine visited there too, but rarely.

I had the greatest respect for Edward Lasker, because when I was a
little boy, the very first book I had read in my entire life was not
Fun With Dick and Jane, but was Chess for Fun and Chess for Blood by
Edward Lasker.

One day in about 1971, while hanging out at the Chess House on 72nd
Street, Edward Lasker challenged me to a game of chess. I sat down to
play him. Facing the front door, I was sitting at the first table near
the front door on the left hand side of the central corridor.

Some months before this, I had spotted Reuben Fine standing on the
second floor near the top of the stairways. I had approached him and
asked him if he would like to play a game of chess. “Are you Browne?”,
asked Reuben Fine. I replied that I was not Walter Browne, I was just
an expert. Reuben Fine responded that he was not interested in playing
me.

So, on this occasion, I was playing Edward Lasker. Lasker had been a
great player and had won the US Open Chess Championship seven times
before 1920.


False. Lasker won the forerunner of the US Open, the Western
Championship, a total of five times, not seven, and only three of
those were before 1920. In all, he won in 1916, 1917, 1919, 1920, and
1921. Check it out he http://www.usopenchess.org/old_opens.html

However, he was born in 1885, so by 1971 he was 86 years
old and no longer the player he once was.

So, I was playing Edward Lasker with the black pieces, but he was
really no match for me. Soon, I was a piece up with queens off the
board and my pieces were swarming in for checkmate.

Then, Edward Lasker stopped moving. He just sat, and sat and sat,
staring at his busted, hopeless position. He would still move
occasionally but only once every ten minutes or so, even though this
was a skittles game.

Now, at just this moment, who should walk in the door but Reuben
Fine!!! Standing at the front door, Reuben Fine declared that he
wanted to play chess with anybody, anybody at all.

I had never seen Reuben Fine do this before. Here was my big chance to
play the great man, one of the strongest chess players in the world.
Unfortunately, I was stuck in this never-ending game with Edward
Lasker.

The people at the front door knew who Reuben Fine was, so they went
looking for Charlie Hidalgo, the owner of the place. Charlie was an
expert. I feel that Charlie was slightly better than me, but we were
about equal. The problem was that Charlie was crazy. By this, I do not
mean to say that Charlie was nuts. Rather, I mean to say that Charlie
was INSANE.

The building in which the Chess House was located was owned by his
brother, Otto Hidalgo. Otto Hidalgo was a big time Wall Street real
estate broker with Ely Cruikshank Co. Otto had done me a favor by
renting me my first securities broker-dealer office at 120 Liberty
Street. Otto was letting Charlie Hidalgo operate a chess club in the
building owned by Otto.

Charlie Hidalgo was found in the back of the club, probably babbling
to himself in one of his schizophrenic tirades, and brought to the
front and sat down to play Reuben Fine.

They were playing on the same row as me. Just across the center isle,
only two boards away from where I was still playing Edward Lasker, who
still had not yet moved.

A big crowd gathered around the game to watch. I could not see
anything. I could see that they were playing five minute chess and
punching the clock, but I could not see through the crowd any of the
actual moves.

Finally, after about 20 minutes or so, after they had played several
games, Reuben Fine got up and walked out the door.

Meanwhile, Edward Lasker still had not moved.

Finally, I got angry. Eventually, Edward Lasker moved and I replied
instantly. After a few more instant moves, I started blundering and
lost the game.

I then went looking for the players who had witnessed the games. I
asked them what the results of the games were, who had won, what
openings had been played and so on. Unfortunately, it turned out that
the actual spectators had been so weak at chess that they did not even
who had won the games, much less what openings had been played or
anything else about the games.

So, finally, I found Charlie, sitting in the back of the club. “Who
won the games, Charlie?”, I asked.

Charlie just sat their babbling in his incoherent style, “Yea Yea Yea
Yada Yada Yada”, said Charlie Hidalgo. It was impossible to get any
information out of him at all.

That was the last time I ever saw Reuben Fine come to the club.

The significance of this? After famously declining to play in the 1948
World Chess Championship tournament in The Hague and Moscow, Reuben
Fine had played in only one more tournament, that being in 1951. He
has one skittles game he played against Bobby Fischer in 1963 which is
in the book “My 60 Memorable Games” by Bobby Fischer. If I had played
those games against Reuben Fine on that day in 1971 or even seen him
playing Charlie Hidalgo, I would have remembered the games, written
them down, published them, and then they would have become part of
chess history.

Instead, I did not get to play Reuben Fine or even to see him play,
because Edward Lasker refused to move.

Now you understand why I hate Edward Lasker.


I can understand why you might be annoyed, but hate seems rather
more than a bit much.
  #3  
Old July 26th 08, 07:41 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.analysis
samsloan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,869
Default Why I hate Edward Lasker

This picture illustrates my game against Edward Lasker. Here is a
picture of the Chess House on 72nd Street.

http://www.chessgraphics.net/wa.htm

I was sitting at the left hand front table on the right end of table
facing the door.

When Reuben Fine and Charlie Hidalgo started playing, they were right
across the aisle from me at the middle of the three boards.
Unfortunately, with a crowd gathered to watch the games and me still
playing Edward Lasker, I did not get to see any of the moves.

Of course, had I known that Fine was going to leave so quickly, that
Lasker would take so long to move and would never resign and that this
would be the one and only chance for me ever to play Reuben Fine in my
entire life, and had I thought about it, I would have resigned by game
against Lasker so that I could play Reuben Fine.

Sam Sloan
  #4  
Old July 27th 08, 01:39 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.analysis
samsloan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,869
Default Why I hate Edward Lasker

On Jul 26, 2:41 pm, samsloan wrote:
This picture illustrates my game against Edward Lasker. Here is a
picture of the Chess House on 72nd Street.

http://www.chessgraphics.net/wa.htm

I was sitting at the left hand front table on the right end of table
facing the door.

When Reuben Fine and Charlie Hidalgo started playing, they were right
across the aisle from me at the middle of the three boards.
Unfortunately, with a crowd gathered to watch the games and me still
playing Edward Lasker, I did not get to see any of the moves.

Of course, had I known that Fine was going to leave so quickly, that
Lasker would take so long to move and would never resign and that this
would be the one and only chance for me ever to play Reuben Fine in my
entire life, and had I thought about it, I would have resigned by game
against Lasker so that I could play Reuben Fine.

Sam Sloan


I just realized that Woody Allen is in this picture on the top.

http://www.chessgraphics.net/jpg/wa2.jpg

Woody is sitting on the right hand side wearing a tan jacket with his
back to the camera. This is the actual layout of the real Chess House
on 72nd Street. When Reuben Fine played Charlie Hidalgo, they were
sitting at the board immediately to the right of where Woody is
sitting now.

Sam Sloan
  #5  
Old July 27th 08, 04:29 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.analysis
Tobias Heidelmann
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Posts: 65
Default Why I hate Edward Lasker

samsloan schrieb:
This picture illustrates my game against Edward Lasker. Here is a
picture of the Chess House on 72nd Street.

http://www.chessgraphics.net/wa.htm

I was sitting at the left hand front table on the right end of table
facing the door.

When Reuben Fine and Charlie Hidalgo started playing, they were right
across the aisle from me at the middle of the three boards.
Unfortunately, with a crowd gathered to watch the games and me still
playing Edward Lasker, I did not get to see any of the moves.

Of course, had I known that Fine was going to leave so quickly, that
Lasker would take so long to move and would never resign and that this
would be the one and only chance for me ever to play Reuben Fine in my
entire life, and had I thought about it, I would have resigned by game
against Lasker so that I could play Reuben Fine.

Sam Sloan

do you have a record of your game against lasker?
  #6  
Old July 27th 08, 06:00 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.analysis
samsloan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,869
Default Why I hate Edward Lasker

On Jul 27, 11:29 am, Tobias Heidelmann -
dortmund.de wrote:
samsloan schrieb:

This picture illustrates my game against Edward Lasker. Here is a
picture of the Chess House on 72nd Street.


http://www.chessgraphics.net/wa.htm


I was sitting at the left hand front table on the right end of table
facing the door.


When Reuben Fine and Charlie Hidalgo started playing, they were right
across the aisle from me at the middle of the three boards.
Unfortunately, with a crowd gathered to watch the games and me still
playing Edward Lasker, I did not get to see any of the moves.


Of course, had I known that Fine was going to leave so quickly, that
Lasker would take so long to move and would never resign and that this
would be the one and only chance for me ever to play Reuben Fine in my
entire life, and had I thought about it, I would have resigned by game
against Lasker so that I could play Reuben Fine.


Sam Sloan


do you have a record of your game against lasker?


I played many games against Lasker as he was always at the club at
that time. I did not write them down nor do I remember them as it was
not a big deal at that time.

Sam Sloan
 




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