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Z. Borovsky-Rubinstein, London 1922



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 5th 03, 07:24 PM
Charles Blair
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Default Z. Borovsky-Rubinstein, London 1922


David Blue asks about Znosko-Borovsky vs Rubinstein, London 1922:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be2 a6 7.O-O Nbd7 8.f4 b5 9.
Bf3 Bb7 10.e5 Bxf3 11.Nxf3 b4 12.Na4 dxe5 13.fxe5 Nd5 14.Kh1 Be7 15.Bd2 O-O 16.
c4 bxc3 17.Nxc3 Nxc3 18.Bxc3 Nb6 19.Rc1 Qxd1 20.Rfxd1 Nd5 21.Bd4 Rfc8 22.Kg1 h5
23.g3 g5 24.Nd2 Nb4 25.a3 Rxc1 26.Rxc1 Rd8 27.Nb3 Nd3 28.Rc7 Bf8 29.Rc6 a5 30.
Bb6 Rb8 31.Rc3 Rxb6 32.Rxd3 a4 33.Nd2 Rxb2 34.Ne4 Be7 35.Rd4 Rb5 36.Rxa4 Rxe5
37.Kf2 f5 38.Nd2 Rb5 39.Nf3 Rb2+ 40.Ke1 Bf6 41.h4 g4 42.Ng1 Kf7 43.Ne2 e5 44.
Ra7+ Be7 45.Nc3 Ke6 46.Ra6+ Bd6 47.a4 Kd7 48.Nd5 Bc5 49.Nf6+ Kc7 50.Nxh5 Bf2+
51.Kf1 Be3 52.Rg6 Kb7 53.Ng7 f4 54.gxf4 exf4 55.Nf5 Bc5 56.Rxg4 f3 57.Re4 Rf2+
58.Ke1 Rg2 59.Nd4 Rg3 60.Kf2 Rh3 61.Rf4 1/2-1/2

Move 36. I think if there were no units on the board but White Kg1,
Ra4 and Pa3, and Black Kg8, Re5 and Pf7 and Pe6, Black should win, and
I don't see the pawns on the g and h files or the knight versus bishop
as weights pulling in White's favour, so Black should win, right?


This kind of simplification has limits. If we take everything away
but the kings and pawns, White to move wins!

Does anyone want to analyze this endgame?


+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+ It's silly for a player
8 | |///| |///| |///| |///| struggling to reach
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+ class A to offer advice
7 |///| |///| k |///| |///| | to Rubinstein, but
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+ things looked pretty
6 | R |///| | b | |///| |///| hopeless after Nxh5.
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
5 |///| |///| N | p | p |///| p | At this point Rubinstein
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+ played 48...Bc5, and
4 | P |///| |///| |///| p | P | I suggest 48...f4.
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
3 |///| |///| |///| | P | |
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
2 | | r | |///| |///| |///|
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
1 |///| |///| | K | |///| |
+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
a b c d e f g h
Pawns: W a4,h4,g3 B e5,f5,h5,g4

  #3  
Old July 10th 03, 12:44 AM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Default Z. Borovsky-Rubinstein, London 1922

Nice suggestions Mike!

From those suggestions it seems that black had a great advantage. Did
black played wrong in any move or simply black played outplayed white?

As an Def Alekhine player I had seen some similar endings and I prefer
black but I know that queenside majority is important too. When black
started complications white played some only moves in a strange
situation (it seemed lost) and saved himself miraculously:

Trying to defend white I suggest 30.Rc4 with the idea of 31.Nxa5 or
31.Ra4 exchanging his e5 pawn for the a5 pawn.

Antonio T.

En/na Mike Ogush ha escrit:
Z. Borovsky-Rubinstein, London 1922, annotations by Geza Maroczy, any
mistakes translating from descriptive to algebraic mine.

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd 4. Nxd Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Be2 a6 7. 0-0
Nbd7 8. f4 b5 9. Bf3 Bb7 10. e5 (1) BxB 11. NxB b4 12. Na4 dxe 13. fxe
Nd5 14. Kh1 Be7 15. Bd2 0-0 16. c4 bxc 17. Nxc3 NxN 18. BxN Nb6 19.
Rc1 QxQ 20. RfxQ Nd5 21. Bd4 Rfc8 22. Kg1 h5 23. g3 g5 24. Nd2 Nb4 25.
a3 RxR 26. RxR Rd8 27. Nb3 Nd3 28. Rc7 Bf8 29. Rc6 a5 30. Bb6 Rb8 31.
Rc3 RxB 32. RxN a4 33. Nd2 Rxb2 (2) 34. Ne4 Be7 35. Rd4 Rb5 36. Rxa4
Rxe5 37. Kf2 f5 38. Nd2 Rb5 39. Nf3 Rb2+ 40. Ke1 Bf6 41. h4 g4 42. Ng1
Kf7 43. Ne2 e5 44. Ra7+ Be7 45. Nc3 Ke6 46. Ra6+ Bd6 47. a4 Kd7 48.
Nd5 Bc5 49. Nf6+ Kc7 50. Nxh4 Bf2+ 51. Kf1 Be3 52. Rg6 (3) Kb7 53. Ng7
f4 54. gxf gxf 55. Nf5 (4) Bc5 56. Rxg4 f3 57. Re4 Rf2+ 58. Ke1 Rg2
59. Nd4 Rg3 60. Kf2 Rh3 61. Rf4 Drawn


At move 34 Rubinstein passed up a chance to offer trade one of his
kingside pawns for the pawn at a3, i.e., 34...Ra2. After 35.Nxg5 Bxa3
36.Kf1 (not 36.Rd7 Bc5+ 37.Kf1 Rf2+ 38.Ke1 Rf5 39.Nh3 Rxe5+ 40.Kd1
a3-+) 36...Bc1 37.Nf3 a3 I believe that preventing the a-pawn from
queening will divert White's pieces and King and allow Black to win
the kingside pawns. If White declines the offer 35.Nd6 g4! White is
in Zugzwang. He cannot defend the pawns at a3, e5 and h2.

Also 42....f4! should win. White cannot take the pawn.
1) 43.gxf4 Bxh4+ 44.Kd1 (44.Kf1 Rf2+ 45.Ke1 Rxf4+ 46.Ke2 Rxa4 -+) Rb1+
and Black wins the knight
2) 43.Rxf4 Be5 44.Rc4 Bxg3+ 45.Kd1 Rb1+ 46.Rc1 Rxc1+ 47.Kxc1 Bxh4 and
Black wins
If White refrains from capturing at f4 Black will win the g- and
h-pawns anyway with fxg3 and Bxh4.

Mike Ogush



  #4  
Old July 14th 03, 08:41 PM
Mike Ogush
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Default Z. Borovsky-Rubinstein, London 1922

On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 15:55:04 +0200, Antonio Torrecillas
wrote:

Hello, some comments belov,

En/na Mike Ogush ha escrit:
On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 00:44:51 +0200, Antonio Torrecillas
wrote:

Nice suggestions Mike!
(...)
Trying to defend white I suggest 30.Rc4 with the idea of 31.Nxa5 or
31.Ra4 exchanging his e5 pawn for the a5 pawn.


Hello Antonio,

After 30.Rc4 Rd5 31.Ra4 Rb5 32.Nxa5 Nxb2 33.Bxb2 Rxb2 I think that
Black has some advantage primarily because White cannot easily
activate his King where as Black can. Also, Whites pieces are
somewhat uncoordinated on the a-file.


ok, 30...Rd5 31.Ra4 Rb5! seems good for black,
I suggest 30...Rd5 31.Bc3 and now there are two similar possibilities:
- 31...Nxb2 32.Bxb2 Rb5 33.Nxa5 Rxb2 34.a4
- 31...Rb5 32.Nxa5 Nxb2 33.Bxb2 Rxb2 34.a4
(I post both lines because you could improve anyone of them)
If we arrive at 34.a4 we have a similar ending to the proposed by you,
but with white pieces better coordinated after a later Nc6. But white
continue with problems due to 34...g4! 35.Nc6 Bh6!. The problem of white
position is that it can not be improved (and his pieces have not much
mobility), while black can activate his king, attack white pawns, ...


Antonio,

At first I liked the thought of 31...Nxe5 but after 32.Ra4 Nd3 33.Rxa5
Bg7 34.Rxd5 exd5 35.Nd4 I think White is somewhat better because he
can mobilize the queen-side pawns.

So a I strated looking in depth at the two lines you presented.
I don't think that there is anyway for Black to improve on those lines
and I also agree that Black's 34th and 35th moves are best. In the
position that results I believe White must prevent Black from checking
with the bishop on the g1-a7 diagonal since in order to avoid
checkmate White will hve to give up both the king-side pawns as I
explained in the previous post.

So here White has two choices:
a) guarding the e3 square with 36.Re4 or
b) moving the king before any check with 36.Kh1.

a) After 36.Re4 Kg7 White cannot stop all of Black's threats: winning
the pawn at h2 if White king moves to f1), Black marching his king to
f5 and dislodging the rook, Black winning the a-pawn, winning the
e-pawn or winning several pawns. There are quite a number of options
for White to try to hold, but in the end he will lose one or more
pawns and still be unable to use the passed a-pawn. Some sample
variations:
a1) 37.Nd4 Kg6 38.Re2 (38.Ne2 Kf5 39.Nc3 Rc2 -+) Rb4 -+ since White
loses the a-pawn immediately and the e-pawn shortly
a2) 37.a5 Ra2 38.h3 (38.Re1 Bd2 39.Re2 Ra1+ -+ White will be unable to
defend both the e- and h-pawns for long) 38.h3 gxh3 39.Rh4 Kg6 40.Rxh3
Bd2 41.Rh2 Ra1+ 42.Kf2 Bxa5 -+ once again all of White's remaining
pawns are weak and must be fended by pieces. Black will be able to
win one of these pawns by forcing White to spread his defenders (rook,
knight and king) on the two separate squares (e5 and g3) and then
concentrate more of his forces on the e-pawn and win it.

b) After 36.Kg1 the win is much harder because White can minimize
concessions and arrive at a rook and pawn end only being down two
pawns to one. An example variation might be 36...Be3! (anyway now
Black is in zugzwang) 37.h3 (or 37.h4) gxh4 38.Rh4 Ra2 39.Rxh3 Rxa4
40.Rxh5 Kg7 41.Kg2 Rc4 42.Na5 Rc2+ 43.Kf3 Rc3 44.Nb7 Kg6 45.Rh1 Bb6+
46.Kf4 Bc7 47.Nd6 Bxd6 48,exd6 Rd3 and Black will win the pawn at d6.

Note: White is not forced to go into the above variation; however, I
think that the most White can hope for is a position with a similar
evaluation to the one arrived at.

Unfortunately, I think that this position is still lost for White. If
he could trade his last reamining pawn to get to K+R+P vs. K+R end
he could reach the haven of a draw. However, Black can drive Whites's
king back or out of play before trading down into a won rook or king
and pawn ending.

I believe an improvement for White's play must be looked for earlier.

Mike Ogush




The natural 34.Nc4 leads to some Black increasing his slight advantage
by creating mating threats, e.g. 34...Bc5+ 35.Kh1 (or the h-pawn
falls) Rb1+ 36.Kg2 g4! (threatening Rg1#) 37.h3 Rg1+ 38.Kh2 h4!
(threatening hxg3#) Here I think the best White can do is 39.hxg4 Rxg3
when White will lose either the a- or the g-pawn and be a pawn down. I
have been looking at varitions where the bishop and knight are traded,
white's e-pawn and black's h-pawn are traded and Black marches his
king in front of hist two pawns to shield it from Rook checks
eventually winning the White rook, but I don't know if Black can force
this against all defenses.


The Rc3 defend g3 and some mate treats: 34.Nc4 Bc5+ 35.Kh1 Rb1+ 36.Kg2
g4! 37.h3 Rg1+ 38.Kh2 h4! 39.gxh4 and there is no mate.

After 34.Nc4 Bc5 35.Kh1 seems better not to allow white to exit form
first line: for example 35...Rc2! 36.Nd6 Ra2 (or 36...Re2) 37.Nc4 g4
with similar problems for black we saw in 30.Rc4 and being a pawn down.

Another try is 34.h4 to try to resolve the king-side pawn situation.
But after 34...Bc5+ 35.Kf1 g4! 36.Nc4 Rf2+ 37.Ke1 Rh2! Black should
win both the g- and h-pawns and still be able to stop White's a-apwn
from queening.


The same applies to 34.h4 white is worse positionally (like in 30.Rc4
line) and it's a pawn down.

Let me know if there are any holes in the analysis or other earlier
improvments for White.

Mike Ogush

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd 4. Nxd Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Be2 a6 7. 0-0
Nbd7 8. f4 b5 9. Bf3 Bb7 10. e5 (1) BxB 11. NxB b4 12. Na4 dxe 13. fxe
Nd5 14. Kh1 Be7 15. Bd2 0-0 16. c4 bxc 17. Nxc3 NxN 18. BxN Nb6 19.
Rc1 QxQ 20. RfxQ Nd5 21. Bd4 Rfc8 22. Kg1 h5 23. g3 g5 24. Nd2 Nb4 25.
a3 RxR 26. RxR Rd8 27. Nb3 Nd3 28. Rc7 Bf8 29. Rc6 a5 30. Bb6 Rb8 31.
Rc3 RxB 32. RxN a4 33. Nd2 Rxb2 (2) 34. Ne4 Be7 35. Rd4 Rb5 36. Rxa4
Rxe5 37. Kf2 f5 38. Nd2 Rb5 39. Nf3 Rb2+ 40. Ke1 Bf6 41. h4 g4 42. Ng1
Kf7 43. Ne2 e5 44. Ra7+ Be7 45. Nc3 Ke6 46. Ra6+ Bd6 47. a4 Kd7 48.
Nd5 Bc5 49. Nf6+ Kc7 50. Nxh4 Bf2+ 51. Kf1 Be3 52. Rg6 (3) Kb7 53. Ng7
f4 54. gxf gxf 55. Nf5 (4) Bc5 56. Rxg4 f3 57. Re4 Rf2+ 58. Ke1 Rg2
59. Nd4 Rg3 60. Kf2 Rh3 61. Rf4 Drawn



 




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