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  #1  
Old December 26th 03, 05:20 AM
Avanti
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Posts: n/a
Default request analysis of game


"Joe Helmick" wrote in message
...
Hi everyone,

Real newbie here. That will be clear when you look at this game to

someone
rated even lower than me. Anyway, this loss hurt badly because I really

can't
see where I went so horribly wrong. I solicit your advice....

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bd3?

Place pieces on squares where they are 'doing something' Bc4 would be a
reasonable possibilty here. Also Bd3 blocks the d pawn which in turn blocks
your bishop.

Bc5 5. O-O Ng4 6. Qe1 Nxf2 7. Rxf2
Bxf2+ 8. Qxf2 O-O 9. Bc4 Nb4 10. d3 d6 11. a3 Nc6 12. Be3


Again the piece is not placed on an aggressive square, Bg5 would be nicer in
this position.
Bg4 13. Qg3

Rf1 could be played here.

Qc8
14. b4 g5 15. Bxg5 Nd4 16. Bh6


What about the simple Nxd4, the bishop is pinned and will soon be yours.

Nxc2 17. Bxf8 Nxa1 18. Qe1 Qxf8 19. Qxa1 Qg7
20. Nd5 Bxf3 21. Ne7+ Kf8 22. Nf5


Here it is clear you are not looking what your opponent is threatening.

Qxg2#

You must counter the opponents threats unless you have a greater threat.



  #2  
Old January 7th 04, 09:33 PM
XaqaX
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Posts: n/a
Default request analysis of game

Hi,

After having taken a quick look at your game, I noticed that you choose
early in the game (move 6 to exchange your Knight and Bishop for White's
Rook. (6...Nxf2, 7.Rxf2 Bxf2 8.Qxf2)

You lost the exchange; handing six points to your opponent (Your Bishop
valued at 3 and your Knight also valued at 3) whilst you received only 5,
being the value of White's Rook.

More importantly, however, I believe that this early in the game, it is
wrong. The rook, powerful as it is, does not come into play until the middle
game and exorts its full power only in the end game.

Furthermore, if you look at the position on the board after the exchange
(move 8...) you will notice that the exchange also left you well behind in
development.
You have merely two developments. Your pawn on e5 and your Knight on c6.

White has developed his white squared Bishop to d3, both his Knights (on c3
and f3) his Queen on f2 and his e-pawn on e4. Also he managed to tuck his
King to safety.

Obviously further mistakes were made as the game progressed, but after move
8 you had an uphill struggle.

Regards
XaqaX


"Avanti" schreef in bericht
...

"Joe Helmick" wrote in message
...
Hi everyone,

Real newbie here. That will be clear when you look at this game to

someone
rated even lower than me. Anyway, this loss hurt badly because I really

can't
see where I went so horribly wrong. I solicit your advice....

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bd3?

Place pieces on squares where they are 'doing something' Bc4 would be a
reasonable possibilty here. Also Bd3 blocks the d pawn which in turn

blocks
your bishop.

Bc5 5. O-O Ng4 6. Qe1 Nxf2 7. Rxf2
Bxf2+ 8. Qxf2 O-O 9. Bc4 Nb4 10. d3 d6 11. a3 Nc6 12. Be3


Again the piece is not placed on an aggressive square, Bg5 would be nicer

in
this position.
Bg4 13. Qg3

Rf1 could be played here.

Qc8
14. b4 g5 15. Bxg5 Nd4 16. Bh6


What about the simple Nxd4, the bishop is pinned and will soon be yours.

Nxc2 17. Bxf8 Nxa1 18. Qe1 Qxf8 19. Qxa1 Qg7
20. Nd5 Bxf3 21. Ne7+ Kf8 22. Nf5


Here it is clear you are not looking what your opponent is threatening.

Qxg2#

You must counter the opponents threats unless you have a greater threat.





  #3  
Old January 8th 04, 04:29 PM
Yeti
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Posts: n/a
Default request analysis of game

Hi,

As a general comment, you played too passively (assuming you were
White). However, you had the better position for most of the game.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bd3


Not good, the bishop does not do anything useful here.

Bc5 5. O-O Ng4


This is bad. Two pieces should not be exchanged for a rook and a pawn
at this stage.

6. Qe1 Nxf2 7. Rxf2
Bxf2+ 8. Qxf2 O-O 9. Bc4


Showing that the bishop was useless at d3.

Nb4 10. d3 d6 11. a3 Nc6 12. Be3 Bg4 13. Qg3 Qc8
14. b4 g5 ???


This move can not be condemned harshly enough. Black loses a pawn, and
opens the door for a decisive attack on his king. White was much
better already - now there is no question about who's winning.

15. Bxg5 Nd4 16. Bh6 Nxc2 17. Bxf8


No! Qh4 (threatening Qg5+ and Qg7 mate) wins outright. Look for the
checkmate in situations like this! Black handed you the mate on a
plate by playing g5 earlier.

Nxa1 18. Qe1 Qxf8 19. Qxa1 Qg7
20. Nd5 ??


White was still a little better. Now you lose the knight and the game
due to ignoring your opponent's threats.

Bxf3 21. Ne7+ Kf8 22. Nf5 Qxg2#

Thank you,

Joe


  #4  
Old January 8th 04, 06:14 PM
Mark S. Hathaway
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Posts: n/a
Default request analysis of game

Yeti wrote:
Hi,

As a general comment, you played too passively (assuming you were
White). However, you had the better position for most of the game.


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3

{ 2. f4 (King's Gambit) and 2. Nc3 with f2-f4 (Vienna Gambit)
are more probably adventurous, but very very well analyzed
from years of trials. This doesn't mean, however, that your
particular opponent will know them. }

2...Nc6 3. Nc3

{ Most people these days believe White should aim for
c2-c3 and d2-d4 to apply major lasting pressure on
Black's pawn e5. Alternatively White can play something
like a Scotch Gambit (3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 and 5. O-O)
to gain quick piece play. The simple 3. Bc4 (Giuoco Piano)
is also good, though not quite as provocative as Bb5
(Spanish Game/Ruy Lopez). }

3...Nf6

{ This is normal and o.k. If you're in the mood to
really challenge White then you might also consider
3...Bc5 with the idea of ...d6, ...Bg4 and leaving
Ng8 to be developed as needed. }

4. Bd3

{ 4. Bb5 is pretty common. The idea is to develop actively,
leaving the way clear for d2-d3 or d2-d4 and then Bc1 can
also be moved. }

Not good, the bishop does not do anything useful here.


4...Bc5

{ There's no immediate tactical refutation of 4. Bd3,
but this normal developing move is very good. }

5. O-O Ng4

{ It's premature, I think, to go looking for king-side play.
Black needs more development. So, 5...a6 to give Bc5 a
retreat square (a7) and then ...d6 OR 5...O-O to prepare
...d5 are better alternative plans. }

This is bad. Two pieces should not be exchanged for
a rook and a pawn at this stage.


6. Qe1

{ 6. Nd5 to clear the way for central expansion
by c2-c3, Bd3-c2, d2-d4 should be effective. }

6...Nxf2 7. Rxf2 Bxf2+ 8. Qxf2

{ The result of this is that White now has 4 pieces
developed (Nc3, Bd3, Nf3, Qf2) and Black has only
1 (Nc6). Spending tempi (as Black did) forcing a
trade-off of your own active pieces isn't usuall
good. }

8...O-O 9. Bc4

Showing that the bishop was useless at d3.


9...Nb4

{ More excursions? Can this succeed? NO. So, don't
waste time on it. }

10. d3 d6 11. a3 Nc6 12. Be3

{ The payoff for defending properly, and repulsing,
black's ...Nb4, is that White gets another development
move. It might've been better to go for Bg5, but this
is very good too. White can anticipate Ra1-f1, Nf3-g5
and a breakthrough at f7. What has Black got to show
for his/her earlier play? This position is awfully close
to a decisive advantage for White! }

12...Bg4 13. Qg3

( 13. Rf1 )

13...Qc8 14. b4

( 14. Nd5 )

14...g5 ???

This move can not be condemned harshly enough. Black loses a pawn, and
opens the door for a decisive attack on his king. White was much
better already - now there is no question about who's winning.


{ Suicide! Black might as well resign after playing that. }

15. Bxg5

{ { Also } 15. Nxg5 { avoiding any possibility of ...Bg4xf3 } )

15...Nd4 16. Bh6

{ There are many ways to victory here. }

( 16. Nxd4 exd4 17. Nd5 )

16...Nxc2 17. Bxf8

No! Qh4 (threatening Qg5+ and Qg7 mate) wins outright. Look for the
checkmate in situations like this! Black handed you the mate on a
plate by playing g5 earlier.


{ Bh6 is better than Rf8 as it assists in a checkmating attack.
So, don't trade for that reason. Secondly, continue the
attack on Kg8, as the other annotator suggests. Aside from
17. Qh4 there is also 17. Nd5 (threatening Ne7+ to win Qc8 or
17. Rc1 to simply hang onto the rook while gaining time. }

17...Nxa1 18. Qe1

{ Awful. Bf8 is valuable in the attack on Kg8, but Na1
is pretty much irrelevant. So, save Bf8 by 18. Bh6. }

18...Qxf8 19. Qxa1 Qg7

{ Now look at who's pieces are developed. White still has
at least three (Nf3, Bc4, Nc3), but Black now has two
(Bg4 and Qg7), so it's much closer to equal than before.
Also, Black's king looks much safer than it was a few
moves before. }

20. Nd5 ??

White was still a little better. Now you lose the knight and the game
due to ignoring your opponent's threats.


{ White appears to be completely shaken by the turn of
events. }

( 20...Qf1 { is still equal } )

20...Bxf3 21. Ne7+ Kf8 22. Nf5 Qxg2#
 




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