A Chess forum. ChessBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » ChessBanter forum » Chess Newsgroups » rec.games.chess.analysis (Chess Analysis)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

How To Think Ahead In Chess By Horowitz and Reinfeld



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 9th 03, 09:14 PM
Greg Teets
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How To Think Ahead In Chess By Horowitz and Reinfeld

I am pretty new at chess so I have been reading this book which by
title seems to have what I am looking for. However, every example
opens with d4-d5. Is this book of any value if my opponent does
something different?

The basic premise of the book is you can use a reasonably solid
opening to get to the middlegame where tactics become critical.
Is the premise still good or is this book outdated?

The whole idea I think is to push off opening study until later and
concentrate on tactics.

Thanks in advance for any opinions.

Greg Teets
Cincinnati Ohio


  #2  
Old July 10th 03, 12:34 AM
Alberich
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How To Think Ahead In Chess By Horowitz and Reinfeld

In article ,
says...
I am pretty new at chess so I have been reading this book which by
title seems to have what I am looking for. However, every example
opens with d4-d5. Is this book of any value if my opponent does
something different?

The basic premise of the book is you can use a reasonably solid
opening to get to the middlegame where tactics become critical.
Is the premise still good or is this book outdated?

The whole idea I think is to push off opening study until later and
concentrate on tactics.

Thanks in advance for any opinions.

Greg Teets
Cincinnati Ohio



I totally disagree with this idea. You have to study opening theory in
tandem with tactics. The only way tactics becomes paramount is if you're
playing Fischerrandom chess or shufflechess proper which has over 2,000
ways of arranging the back rank pieces for playing. In that case, only
in shuffle chess can you practice tactics without worrying about opening
theory.

Even if you're good in tactics, you'll be blown away by opponents who
are more familiar with the nuances of the Marcozy bind in the Sicilian
Defence, the Sozin Attack, the 150 Attack against the Pirc/Modern
complex, the Bayonet attack in the King's Indian Defence, etc. You're up
the creek unless you have a clear understanding of the IDEAS behind the
openings themselves. There's no way to practice tactics if you're being
slammed and crushed by opponents in their favorite openings.

The one thing I've found is if you have a demanding job (which requires
you to spend alot of time away from the chessboard) you have to become
practical and search for openings as White and Black that limit your
opponents chances to throw you off your path. I've found several
openings for White that do this job nicely...King's Indian Attack, the
London System and the Catalan.

With Black, it's a little more difficult because White chooses which
side of the board to concentrate on, either e4 or d4. In the case for
Black...against d4 I would stick with the Tarrasch Defence against the
Queen's Gambit Declined, or even choose the Queen's Gambit Accepted. Two
very solid ways of responding against d4 openings. But you have to be
careful here as well. Because your opponent might go for the Tromp
Attack, 1.d4 d5 2.Bg5 and straight away cause a cramping effect on your
game. In case opponents try this opening ploy, I would suggest studying
the Tromppowsky opening exclusively to become familiar with it to help
you avoid problems with it. And this opening is exactly the kind that
forces you to study theory alongside tactics. It's a perfect blend of
both that requires both at the same time.

Against e4 openings, I would suggest you study the Alekhine Defence,
French Defence and the Scandinavian and the Pirc/Modern. These openings
allow you to build solid defensive positions from which you can later
attack your opponent when you survive the opening phases of the game.
Once you get past that...then you can show off your tactics and skills
looking at those trappy 2 move combos. Stay away from the Sicilian as
Black because White has too many options to choose from in that very
heavily analyzed opening. You would be required to know how to handle
the c3 Sicilian, the Sozin, the Keres Attack, the Chigorin variation,
the Nadjorf, the Schevenevigen, the Pelikan, the Kan, the Grand Prix,
the Closed Sicilian. And each of these variations in the Sicilian have
multiple subvariations from which your opponent may choose from. Stay
away from the Sicilian as Black. However, if you choose to play e4, be
aware your opponent may very well respond with c5. To avoid the
complexity of facing the Sicilian as White, I would suggest you study
games with the Smith Morra Gambit...popular in club levels and a good
weapon to wield against the Sicilian as White sacrifices a few pawns for
a very dangerous attack against the Black position.

And if you want to study chess ideas and study from annotated games, I
suggest you visit
www.smartchess.com and study games by Irina Krush,
WIM. She's a terrific chess annotator and you can find her annotated
games on that site. (Irina Krush no longer annnotates her games on that
site as her contract with Smartchess.com has expired - at least that's
what I've heard). Other than that you can study from 200 of her games
there. She's a 1.d4 specialist and I can't blame her choice for choosing
that opening as White as she avoids the reams of theory facing against
the Sicilian as I've just mentioned. But she also analyzes games by
other chess masters like Kramnik, Kasparov, Shirov, etc. A really great
chess site with terrific annotations by Irina Krush. A worthwhile visit
there gives you great information on various openings and how to handle
them. Now, if you want to read books on chess games annotated, you
can't go wrong with Fire On Board, by Alexi Shirov...which in my opinion
may very well be the best annotated chess game collection book ever
published. (That is until Kasparov publishes his collection when he
retires from chess). Two other books I'd suggest getting would be Move
by Move and The 50 Most Instructive Modern Chess Games, both by Gambit
Press. Excellent material to study from. I'd also get my hands on 500
Master Games by Dover Press, still in publication. Get that one as soon
as possible because I doubt this book is going to stay in print for very
much longer. It's a treasure trove of all the best games ever played by
the masters of the past prior to Bobby Fischer's reign as World
Champion. Games by Alekhine, Tarrasch, Morphy, E.Lasker, Capablanca and
on and on and on. You can't lose. Great study material in that book too.
Anyway, hope this helps.
  #3  
Old July 10th 03, 06:30 AM
Steven Humphreys
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How To Think Ahead In Chess By Horowitz and Reinfeld

Hi Greg,

This book does what I think you're looking for. The first chapters deal =
with you as white, hence they only have 1. d4. The other chapter cover =
what to do when you're black. They cover responses to both 1. e4 and 1. =
d4.

Steven Humphreys

"Greg Teets" wrote in message =
...
I am pretty new at chess so I have been reading this book which by
title seems to have what I am looking for. However, every example
opens with d4-d5. Is this book of any value if my opponent does
something different? =20
=20
The basic premise of the book is you can use a reasonably solid
opening to get to the middlegame where tactics become critical.
Is the premise still good or is this book outdated?
=20
The whole idea I think is to push off opening study until later and
concentrate on tactics.
=20
Thanks in advance for any opinions.
=20
Greg Teets
Cincinnati Ohio
=20

  #4  
Old July 11th 03, 01:22 AM
Greg Teets
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How To Think Ahead In Chess By Horowitz and Reinfeld

oops. I typed the question before I thought about it. I guess I get
to choose to always play d4.

lol.

Thanks.
Greg



On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 23:30:36 -0600, "Steven Humphreys"
wrote:

Hi Greg,

This book does what I think you're looking for. The first chapters deal with you as white, hence they only have 1. d4. The other chapter cover what to do when you're black. They cover responses to both 1. e4 and 1. d4.

Steven Humphreys

"Greg Teets" wrote in message ...
I am pretty new at chess so I have been reading this book which by
title seems to have what I am looking for. However, every example
opens with d4-d5. Is this book of any value if my opponent does
something different?

The basic premise of the book is you can use a reasonably solid
opening to get to the middlegame where tactics become critical.
Is the premise still good or is this book outdated?

The whole idea I think is to push off opening study until later and
concentrate on tactics.

Thanks in advance for any opinions.

Greg Teets
Cincinnati Ohio



  #5  
Old July 11th 03, 02:07 AM
Greg Teets
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How To Think Ahead In Chess By Horowitz and Reinfeld

I responded a little too quickly the first time.

Let's try this again:

Every response by black in the first section is d5. So if he doesn't
play d5, where does that leave the newcomer?

Thanks again.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2017 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.