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Preparing for war (chess)



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 6th 04, 07:26 AM
King Leopold
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Default Preparing for war (chess)

Please answer the following question. I am truly interested in your answers
so I may pass then pass them on to my students.

Q. How do you prepare (mentally as well as physically), for a tournament
game? Say within a few hours or so prior to the game. In other words, do you
approach a (serious) chess game as if you were preparing to go to war?

Please keep in mind, my students run I-8 grades. So keep your answers
appropriate.

Thank you in Advance!!
Leopold Lacrimosa
Chess Coach
Scottsdale, AZ


  #2  
Old January 6th 04, 02:02 PM
John Lamont
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Default Preparing for war (chess)

I know in tournaments my performance in morning games is vastly lower
than in later games, so make sure you're wide awake!
  #3  
Old January 6th 04, 10:13 PM
Largo SQL Tools
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Default Preparing for war (chess)

Your students run I-8 grades? I would just be thankful you've got kids that
age willing to play chess. Why compare playing a game of chess to going to
war? Why not just tell them to have fun?

"King Leopold" wrote in message
news
Please answer the following question. I am truly interested in your

answers
so I may pass then pass them on to my students.

Q. How do you prepare (mentally as well as physically), for a tournament
game? Say within a few hours or so prior to the game. In other words, do

you
approach a (serious) chess game as if you were preparing to go to war?

Please keep in mind, my students run I-8 grades. So keep your answers
appropriate.

Thank you in Advance!!
Leopold Lacrimosa
Chess Coach
Scottsdale, AZ




  #4  
Old January 6th 04, 10:39 PM
Sandy Breon
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Posts: n/a
Default Preparing for war (chess)

Leopold,

First of all, getting enough sleep the night before is very important. I
might play a game or two of blitz in the morning to get my mind activated,
but not too much activity. I usually end up small talking with other
competitors before the tournament starts, in order to relax and pass the
time, until the first round pairings go up. Then I put my game face on, and
start mentally going through my openings in my head, etc.

I think since these are kids you are dealing with, I would stress having
fun, enjoying the social atmosphere between matches and establishing
friendships, as opposed to winning at all costs. Obviously, at the higher
levels of play, you will want them to get more serious about chess.

Hope this helps,
Sandy


"King Leopold" wrote in message
news
Please answer the following question. I am truly interested in your

answers
so I may pass then pass them on to my students.

Q. How do you prepare (mentally as well as physically), for a tournament
game? Say within a few hours or so prior to the game. In other words, do

you
approach a (serious) chess game as if you were preparing to go to war?

Please keep in mind, my students run I-8 grades. So keep your answers
appropriate.

Thank you in Advance!!
Leopold Lacrimosa
Chess Coach
Scottsdale, AZ




  #5  
Old January 6th 04, 11:24 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
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Posts: n/a
Default Preparing for war (chess)

En/na King Leopold ha escrit:
Please answer the following question. I am truly interested in your answers
so I may pass then pass them on to my students.

Q. How do you prepare (mentally as well as physically), for a tournament
game? Say within a few hours or so prior to the game. In other words, do you
approach a (serious) chess game as if you were preparing to go to war?


Hello Leopold,

In my case, that depends on the kind of tournament:
- In a swiss tournament out of home (where I try to go with some
friends) or in a team tournament (usually out of home too) in the
morning we try to prepare in common a little the opening (with a
database and some knowledge of the adversaries) and to walk (an exercise
easy and not consuming a lot of energy). Then, after the game, I like
very much to see the games commented of my mates (and to show mine).
- In a tournament where I'm at home, it's not so amusing and I try to do
something similar but alone.

Some profesional chessplayers say that it's better to prepare a
tournament in advance and try to rest some days just before the games to
be fresh with energy enough. They have too some ideas about the correct
"way of eating" (time before the game and kind of dishes), ... but this
is a different story.

There are some players whose approaches to chess is very similar to war:
- Those who try to do peace conversations as soon as possible.
- Those who think that all is allowed (dirty war?)

But I prefer an approach closer to doing an exam where you want to do
your best.

AT

  #6  
Old January 6th 04, 11:34 PM
King Leopold
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Posts: n/a
Default Preparing for war (chess)

Thank you for comment. I teach 200+ kids a week the game of chess. Some I
teach how to play, others I prepare for tournaments. Some go as far as
National Events. Telling them to have fun is up most priority for me. But,
eventually, if they stay with chess, they want to try and win, so I want
them to be equipped to win.
Since one of the questions raised by my students was mental preparedness, I
wanted a large selection of answers from other players for my students to
see.That's why I posed the question to the news groups.

Leopold


"Largo SQL Tools" wrote in message
...
Your students run I-8 grades? I would just be thankful you've got kids

that
age willing to play chess. Why compare playing a game of chess to going

to
war? Why not just tell them to have fun?

"King Leopold" wrote in message
news
Please answer the following question. I am truly interested in your

answers
so I may pass then pass them on to my students.

Q. How do you prepare (mentally as well as physically), for a tournament
game? Say within a few hours or so prior to the game. In other words, do

you
approach a (serious) chess game as if you were preparing to go to war?

Please keep in mind, my students run I-8 grades. So keep your answers
appropriate.

Thank you in Advance!!
Leopold Lacrimosa
Chess Coach
Scottsdale, AZ






  #7  
Old January 6th 04, 11:48 PM
King Leopold
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Preparing for war (chess)

Thank you Antonio,
How you answered is exactly what I was looking for. I hope others can
also explain there preparedness for a tournament.
It reminds me of an old Martial Arts saying (I teach Okinawan Kempo
also), There are three types of Martial Arts practitioners.
1.Court Martial Artists,
2.Life Style Martial Artist, and
3.Way of Life Martial Artist
The first type of Martial Artist practice as if they are doing a slow, showy
dance and never want to break a sweat.
The second type practice the martial arts for pleasure and to show others
that they can do some tricks, but never break the surface of what the
Martial Arts truly are.
And the third type practice the Martial Arts as a whole part of their being,
reaping the benefits of true self-defense, which is to never have to use or
to show it in actual practice.
I think it is just like chess,
Some play to win, Some play at it, and Others know how the little horsey
moves.
Leopold


"Antonio Torrecillas" wrote in message
...
En/na King Leopold ha escrit:
Please answer the following question. I am truly interested in your

answers
so I may pass then pass them on to my students.

Q. How do you prepare (mentally as well as physically), for a tournament
game? Say within a few hours or so prior to the game. In other words, do

you
approach a (serious) chess game as if you were preparing to go to war?


Hello Leopold,

In my case, that depends on the kind of tournament:
- In a swiss tournament out of home (where I try to go with some
friends) or in a team tournament (usually out of home too) in the
morning we try to prepare in common a little the opening (with a
database and some knowledge of the adversaries) and to walk (an exercise
easy and not consuming a lot of energy). Then, after the game, I like
very much to see the games commented of my mates (and to show mine).
- In a tournament where I'm at home, it's not so amusing and I try to do
something similar but alone.

Some profesional chessplayers say that it's better to prepare a
tournament in advance and try to rest some days just before the games to
be fresh with energy enough. They have too some ideas about the correct
"way of eating" (time before the game and kind of dishes), ... but this
is a different story.

There are some players whose approaches to chess is very similar to war:
- Those who try to do peace conversations as soon as possible.
- Those who think that all is allowed (dirty war?)

But I prefer an approach closer to doing an exam where you want to do
your best.

AT



  #8  
Old January 7th 04, 02:47 AM
mdamien
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Preparing for war (chess)

"King Leopold" wrote in message
news
Please answer the following question. I am truly interested in your

answers
so I may pass then pass them on to my students.

Q. How do you prepare (mentally as well as physically), for a tournament
game? Say within a few hours or so prior to the game. In other words, do

you
approach a (serious) chess game as if you were preparing to go to war?

Please keep in mind, my students run I-8 grades. So keep your answers
appropriate.


I've had best results where I was prepared in advance at least a day ahead
of the tournament and could go to bed early and spend some time clearing my
head. I try not to talk to anyone (about chess) between rounds as it throws
off my focus.

Matt


  #9  
Old January 7th 04, 03:05 AM
Robert Smith
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Posts: n/a
Default Preparing for war (chess)

Tips for the day of the tournament

1.) Don't try to cram for a game, like it's a test you forgot to study
for. There isn't much you can do directly before a match to
significantly improve your play. Relax, think positively, and you
might want to take your mind off chess for a while. You'll have
plenty of time for chess, when you play your next game! I often read
a good book to relax and get my mind "warmed up."

2.) Don't have a big meal right before the tournament. Eat enough to
where you won't be hungry during the tournament, but don't get stuffed

3.) Avoid caffeine and sugar prior to the tournament; It can make you
anxious during the game.

4.) Go to the bathroom before your game starts

5.) Listen to some inspirational music on a discman to get into your
zone (classical perhaps?).

Cheers,
-Rob


On Mon, 5 Jan 2004 23:26:20 -0700, "King Leopold"
wrote:

Please answer the following question. I am truly interested in your answers
so I may pass then pass them on to my students.

Q. How do you prepare (mentally as well as physically), for a tournament
game? Say within a few hours or so prior to the game. In other words, do you
approach a (serious) chess game as if you were preparing to go to war?

Please keep in mind, my students run I-8 grades. So keep your answers
appropriate.

Thank you in Advance!!
Leopold Lacrimosa
Chess Coach
Scottsdale, AZ


  #10  
Old January 7th 04, 06:04 AM
michael adams
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Preparing for war (chess)

King Leopold wrote:

Thank you Antonio,
How you answered is exactly what I was looking for. I hope others can
also explain there preparedness for a tournament.
It reminds me of an old Martial Arts saying (I teach Okinawan Kempo
also), There are three types of Martial Arts practitioners.
1.Court Martial Artists,
2.Life Style Martial Artist, and
3.Way of Life Martial Artist
The first type of Martial Artist practice as if they are doing a slow, showy
dance and never want to break a sweat.
The second type practice the martial arts for pleasure and to show others
that they can do some tricks, but never break the surface of what the
Martial Arts truly are.
And the third type practice the Martial Arts as a whole part of their being,
reaping the benefits of true self-defense, which is to never have to use or
to show it in actual practice.
I think it is just like chess,
Some play to win, Some play at it, and Others know how the little horsey
moves.
Leopold

*
Wish I could agree, wish I'd done Judo when I was a kid (don't know
about Okinawan Kempo) - but, in reality there's not that much shrieking,
jumping about, & lashing out with foot & fist in the average game of
chess..

 




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