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Chess Improvement questions......



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 12th 04, 07:34 PM
Alex Dvorak
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Default Chess Improvement questions......

1) How many openings do you need to learn (master) for black and white?
2) Should you study master games?
3) how to determine your weaknesses?
4) How to fix your weaknesses?
  #2  
Old January 13th 04, 03:56 AM
Derek Wildstar
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Default Chess Improvement questions......


"Alex Dvorak" wrote in message
om...

There are many ways to answer these questions, here's one way to answer,
from a very experienced player to one less experienced:


1) How many openings do you need to learn (master) for black and white?


All of them, eventually. But as imposing as that sounds, the path there
isn't that hard. If I were you, I'd practice only 1. e4 openings as White.
You will know when you are ready for 1. d4 openings. That cuts your White
workload in half.

As far as Black goes, I'd study 1. ... c5 against 1. e4 and 1. ... d5
against 1. ... d4. You get a double benefit of halving White's options,
while doubling your opening repetoire. Very efficient, if that's what you're
after.


2) Should you study master games?


Yes, this is one of the best ways to learn the subtle skill of "What the
hell do I do now?".


3) how to determine your weaknesses?


Ask the person that just beat you, he'd be more than happy to tell you.


4) How to fix your weaknesses?


Once deficiencies are noted, do exercises to specifically address
them...such as opening practice, end game exercises, and combination
puzzles. Once you have picked up a new understanding, however minimal, put
it into immediate practice by playing a game, specifically trying to
exericse that new point.

For example, play a specific opening you don't feel comfortable with, or one
you do feel comfortable with, and make drawish moves to get to a tricky end
game, to try for that minor piece mate sequence.

In all of those examples, the more pieces you push, the better you get, how
much better... who can say?







  #3  
Old January 13th 04, 04:24 AM
The Masked Bishop
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Default Chess Improvement questions......

1) How many openings do you need to learn (master) for black and white?

Learn at least three systems well for white and black, two for kingside and
one for queenside for both colors. Add on to these later, depending on your
tastes.

2) Should you study master games?


Study a master you like and understand. Beginners are better with positional
players like Capablanca or Karpov. Alekhine and Kasparov are too difficult
for beginners, and Fischer, Lasker and Morphy are too awesome. Find a master
who plays your favorite openings; it may not be a world champion, it could
be someone like Bronstein, Korchnoi, or Short.

3) how to determine your weaknesses?


I can already tell you what they a hanging pieces, not finding tactics
inherent in a position, and poor pawn structure. Master those three and
you're on your way.

4) How to fix your weaknesses?


Play to lose, by playing opponents who are a class or two better than you.
You'll win every now and then, and it's more satisfying than beating weaker
players (although sometimes ANY win is a good thing!)


TMB


  #4  
Old January 16th 04, 05:21 AM
Randy Bauer
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Default Chess Improvement questions......

I don't know your skill level, but my advice, as a master player who was
once one of those juniors who took older player's rating points in the 70s:

Play a lot and assimilate opening knowledge from your games. I was 1600
before I seriously cracked an opening book. Play typical classical openings
at first, because they allow normal development schemes and understanding of
the conduct of the opening (reasonable control of the center, active piece
deployment, king safety).

Assimilating knowledge from your games means you actually have to look at
them and try to learn from them. Always seek to analyze games after their
conclusion. For less serious games, you still want to keep a record of them
and analyze them either by yourself or with others. This is particularly
helpful with a somewhat stronger player.

Absolutely study master games, because they will give you examples of what a
good game looks like. This is part of the assimilation of chess skill
process. However, I would start with books that explain as they go along.
One of my favorites was Chernev's "The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever
Played." You can generally find this for $5-$10 in bookstores or on the
Internet. Likewise, Chernev's "Logical Chess, Move by Move" which has been
issued in algabraic notation, is a very helpful book.

Dan Heisman writes good books for players just starting out wanting to
identify and fix their weaknesses. For more advanced players, the idea of
asking others is sound.

As you get more advanced, how many openings you should know becomes a very
personal decision. It is as much dicated by the time you wish to devote to
learning and maintaining a repertoire as anything. However, if you want to
try to develop chess knowledge through your opening study, I might humbly
suggest you look at an article I wrote many years ago. It's been published
with permission in a couple of books. I really should update it, because
much of what I used to do with pen and paper is now more efficiently done
with databases, but it might prove useful nonetheless:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homep...er/opening.htm

Good luck!
Randy Bauer

"Alex Dvorak" wrote in message
om...
1) How many openings do you need to learn (master) for black and white?
2) Should you study master games?
3) how to determine your weaknesses?
4) How to fix your weaknesses?



 




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