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Bobby Fischer Scared?



 
 
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  #3  
Old January 15th 04, 11:17 PM
Jon Beckett
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Default Bobby Fischer Scared?

On 14 Jan 2004 12:38:42 -0800, (Alex Dvorak) wrote:

(Liam Too) wrote in message . com...
"Bobby Fischer was afraid that if he had defeated Anatoly Karpov in
1975, the Russians would have had him murdered." --GM Pal Benko (in
2003)

I posted the above on January 05, 2004 in the Karpov and Friends
thread and have received lots of rebuttal since then.

The consensus of the emails were that:

Bobby Fischer was never scared of Karpov in 1975 or anyone for that
matter. He was ready to play, but FIDE didn't want him to. Then an
opportunity to play outside FIDE was there for the taking but Karpov
refused and got scared. The rest is history...

Lance Smith


i would be scared; i can't even beat an 1800. And you are talking
about a GM for the world championship?


Go read "Bobby Fischer Goes to War" (it's new - you'll find it on
Amazon). I found it in my local Ottakers in the UK. Great book.

It covers the political side of the 1972 match in detail. The Russians
come across as somewhat mutineers (but partly Spassky's fault), and
Bobby comes across (along with his Lawyer) as a five year old - but on
purpose.

Part of Fischer's strength was in having a psychological advantage
before he sat down to play - and in Iceland he could do that by
dictating the conditions of the match (the Icelandics couldn't afford
to have the match fall through, and Fischer knew it). It didn't help
Spassky that he had virtually burned his bridges with the Soviet
machine that would have provided so much support... (at least three
world champions on hand to assist with analysis and match strategy).
Spassky was an individual - not the a-typical Russian of the era.

If Fischer had played Karpov, who *would* have had the full support of
the soviet chess machine, the match would have been a very different
proposition. I can't imagine Karpov's head being messed with to be
honest.

  #4  
Old January 16th 04, 02:05 AM
sandirhodes
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Default Bobby Fischer Scared?


"Jon Beckett" wrote
Spassky was an individual - not the a-typical Russian of the era.


John, I have a reputation on this forum for being somewhat anal when it comes to English and its usage. You understand, therefore,
that I must comment on this sentence, as I believe you were really trying to imply that Spassky was 'not the typical Russian of the
era,' or perhaps he was 'an a-typical Russian of the era.' Were he not a-typical, perhaps he would have followed party guidelines
more closely.

I apologize, of course, but something inside me won't let these things go! Bruce thinks its a dosage problem.

REC


  #5  
Old January 16th 04, 06:58 AM
Liam Too
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Default Bobby Fischer Scared?

Jon Beckett wrote in message . ..

Go read "Bobby Fischer Goes to War" (it's new - you'll find it on
Amazon). I found it in my local Ottakers in the UK. Great book.


I thought you were only talking. But when I went to Amazon.com, I
found the following:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

For sure, I will buy it.

Thanks, Lance
  #7  
Old January 16th 04, 06:18 PM
Louis Blair
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Default Bobby Fischer Scared?

Lance Smith wrote (2004-01-14 07:37:58 PST):

The consensus of the emails were that:

Bobby Fischer was never scared of Karpov in 1975 or
anyone for that matter. He was ready to play, but
FIDE didn't want him to.


_
Again, it should be noted that, in the end, the only
Fischer condition that F. I. D. E. rejected was the
rule that would have required a challenger to finish
two or more points ahead of Fischer in order to cause
Fischer to lose the title.

"Another attempt was made to bring the FIDE and
Fischer into complete accord, when Colonel
Edmondson (U.S. Chess Federation) asked for the
summoning of an extraordinary meeting of the FIDE
Congress. There being a sufficient number of
countries in agreement, it duly assembled at
Bergen-aan-Zee in the Netherlands from 18 to
20 March, 1975. It was an extraordinary
congress in every sense of the word, and
eventually, after much heated discussion,
one of Fischer's demands was conceded: the
match was to have a limitless number of games.
But Fischer's other demand - that a draw be
declared when the situation reached nine to
nine - was rejected by a majority of three.
Fischer's words on hearing this were, 'It's
all over then.' No match took place. Fischer
ignored the request to say by 2 April whether
or not he would play, and Karpov became the
new world champion" - Golombek (1976)

"Many have rather cynically described [Fischer] as
engaging in 'gamesmanship.' It seems more likely
that the capture of the title led to an emotional
upset of serious proportions. His conditions for
the match with Karpov seem motivated more by inner
fantasies than anything else. Thus so far he has
not played a serious game of chess since he became
champion. There is the grave danger that he may
never play again." - Fine (1976)


Lance Smith wrote (2004-01-14 07:37:58 PST):

Then an opportunity to play outside FIDE was there
for the taking but Karpov refused and got scared.


_
On 2002-07-10 07:57:24 PST, Larry Parr quoted an
email he received "from a reader who recalls some
of the negotiations between Fischer and Karpov to
play a match after the American forfeited his title":

"I'm sure you've heard the famous Campo story, about
Fischer and Karpov staying at different hotels in D.C.,
with Campo as the intermediary, running between the two
with a contract for the World Championship. Each page
laboriously initialed by both, with Karpov agreeing to
all the asinine demands - until they got to the final
stage. When it came to the final signatures, Fischer
decided to change 'Fide World Championship' to
'Professional World Championship.' Karpov -- or his
Russian 'advisors' refused to accept the change to
a page already initialed."
  #8  
Old January 17th 04, 01:17 AM
Bob Musicant
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Default Bobby Fischer Scared?

"sandirhodes" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Jon Beckett" wrote
Spassky was an individual - not the a-typical Russian of the era.


John, I have a reputation on this forum for being somewhat anal when it

comes to English and its usage. You understand, therefore,
that I must comment on this sentence, as I believe you were really trying

to imply that Spassky was 'not the typical Russian of the
era,' or perhaps he was 'an a-typical Russian of the era.' Were he not

a-typical, perhaps he would have followed party guidelines
more closely.

I apologize, of course, but something inside me won't let these things go!

Bruce thinks its a dosage problem.

REC


Will you join with me in a campaign to get the broadcast media to learn the
proper usage of "begs the question," which has unfortunately crept into use
as a cool way of saying "raises the question," and get them away from such
constructions as "Maurice sent the package to Andre and I."?
Bob



  #9  
Old January 17th 04, 06:29 AM
John Macnab
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Default Bobby Fischer Scared?

Bob Musicant wrote:
"sandirhodes" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Jon Beckett" wrote

Spassky was an individual - not the a-typical Russian of the era.


John, I have a reputation on this forum for being somewhat anal when it


comes to English and its usage. You understand, therefore,

that I must comment on this sentence, as I believe you were really trying


to imply that Spassky was 'not the typical Russian of the

era,' or perhaps he was 'an a-typical Russian of the era.' Were he not


a-typical, perhaps he would have followed party guidelines

more closely.

I apologize, of course, but something inside me won't let these things go!


Bruce thinks its a dosage problem.

REC



Will you join with me in a campaign to get the broadcast media to learn the
proper usage of "begs the question," which has unfortunately crept into use
as a cool way of saying "raises the question," and get them away from such
constructions as "Maurice sent the package to Andre and I."?
Bob



I don't know about "coolness", but "begs the question" in the US
typically means "assumes the conclusion without argument", but in the
UK, it typically means "demands that the question be asked". This issue
came up a couple of years ago in a Kingston Taylor review of a Paul
Motwani book. Kingston apparently was not aware of a difference in
usage outside of his own country and slammed Motwani for using the
phrase in the way typical of UK English speakers.

In Canada, both uses of the phrase are common. Context takes care of
meaning either way.

John

  #10  
Old January 17th 04, 11:52 AM
sandirhodes
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Posts: n/a
Default Bobby Fischer Scared?


"Bob Musicant" wrote

"sandirhodes" wrote
I apologize, of course, but something inside me won't let these things go!

Bruce thinks its a dosage problem.

REC


Will you join with me in a campaign to get the broadcast media to learn the
proper usage of "begs the question," which has unfortunately crept into use
as a cool way of saying "raises the question," and get them away from such
constructions as "Maurice sent the package to Andre and I."?
Bob


My biggest peeve: Nobody uses the word 'among' anymore. It's always 'between,' and it's ridiculous. In a private email last year,
I opined:

What I want to know is, when did the rules for proper grammar change? I
have seen countless examples of this very same gaff in magazines,
newspapers, booklets, essays, and virtually every other printed source. In
fact, I don't think I have seen the word 'among' used in this context for
over 10 years. The word 'between' is only proper if you are speaking about
2 items, like a point on a line segment is between the origin points of that
segment. It can't be between three points!! Editors should know this, and
correct it. I think it reflects on the shoddy education system and the lack
of discipline in the corporate world that we have degenerated into! (OK,
'into which we have degenerated'!)

Others are 'then' for 'than,' the usage '$37 dollars,' and these:

"atm machine"
"pin number"
"vin number"
"hiv virus"
"ram memory"
"please rsvp"


 




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