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Analysis help



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 18th 04, 07:38 PM
Marcus
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Posts: n/a
Default Analysis help

Can anyone help me to analyze this game? General plans help more than simply
suggesting a sequence of moves. I included my own analysis and crafty
analysis so you can point where I'm thinking wrong.

This is correspondence chess, but I play as I would play over the board,
without books or moving the pieces on another board.

[Event "Casual Game"]
[Site "GameKnot.com"]
[Date "2004.02.18"]
[Round "-"]
[White "-"]
[Black "me"]
[WhiteElo "1632"]
[BlackElo "1628"]
[PlyCount "61"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 e6
{Crafty: 2... Ne4 3.Bf4 c5 4. f3 Qa5+ 5. c3 Nf6}
3. Nf3 c5 4. e3 Be7 5. c3 b6 6. Bd3 Bb7 7. O-O O-O
8. Nbd2 h6 9. Bh4 d5 10. Qe2 Nbd7 11. Ba6 Qc8
{Crafty: 11... Bxa6 12. Qxa6 c4}
12. Bxb7 Qxb7 13. a4 Rfe8 14. Rfe1 cxd4 15. exd4 Bd6
{I was having trouble to form a plan here. Crafty: 15...Rac8}
16. Ne5 Bxe5
{Not a good move. I usually take the knight if
it's on a central square and I can't find a way to force it back. Of course,
I couldn't play Nxe5. Black will now have to spend 3-4 moves to put the
knight back into the game.}
17.dxe5 Nh7 18. f4 Nhf8 19. g4 f6
{White was advancing the pawns
on the king side. This move wasn't necessary. It only weakens the
defense. Crafty suggests: 19... Ng6 but I was afraid of Bg3 followed by
f5.}
20. Nf3 Ng6 21. exf6 Nxh4 22. f7+ Kxf7 23. Nxh4 Nf6 24. g5 hxg5
25. fxg5 Ne4 26. Qh5+ Ke7 27. Rad1 Nc5
{I saw that 27...Nd6 would lose either the g-pawn to 28.Qg6.
White would then have two connected passed pawns and a
strong attack.}
28. b4 Nxa4 29. Nf5+ Kd7
{The game was lost, but I still had fighting chances. Better was 29.Kd8.
This move loses immediately. I saw only the fork with Nd6 and tried to avoid
it.
I should have thought deeper about the consequences of both moves.}
30.Qf7+ Kc6 31. b5+ 1-0


  #2  
Old February 18th 04, 11:03 PM
Ron
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Posts: n/a
Default Analysis help


As always, take my notes with a grain of salt.

[Event "Casual Game"]
[Site "GameKnot.com"]
[Date "2004.02.18"]
[Round "-"]
[White "-"]
[Black "me"]
[WhiteElo "1632"]
[BlackElo "1628"]
[PlyCount "61"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 e6
{Crafty: 2... Ne4 3.Bf4 c5 4. f3 Qa5+ 5. c3 Nf6}
3. Nf3 c5


By omitting or delaying d5, you're inviting the kind of complications
which are going to make this game more about "a specific series of
moves" and less about a battle of ideas.

4. e3 Be7 5. c3 b6 6. Bd3 Bb7 7. O-O O-O
8. Nbd2 h6 9. Bh4 d5 10. Qe2 Nbd7 11. Ba6 Qc8


I think you're happy to exchange light-squared bishops here, especially
because you don't have much prospect of opening the long diagnal. The
downside is that the trade of bishops makes e3-e4 more of a threat,
unleashing his pieces against your kingside (but the fact that he played
Bh4 rather than Bxf6 makes it seem like white isn't thinking that way).


{Crafty: 11... Bxa6 12. Qxa6 c4}
12. Bxb7 Qxb7 13. a4 Rfe8 14. Rfe1 cxd4 15. exd4 Bd6
{I was having trouble to form a plan here. Crafty: 15...Rac8}


I thik you're eventually going to want to play on the queenside, but it
seems to me that your real goal is to prevent e3-e4. To that end I
think cxd4 is counterproductive, or at least premature. The point that
you either want to find a way to force white to play dxc4 (when your
pieces come alive and quickly find active squares) or to play it
yourself when you are prepared to take advantage of the open file.

Here is seems like you played it primarily because you couldn't think of
anything better to do. I would wait on this move and prepare e5. When
you're ready to play e5, you may be in a position where you want to set
it up by cxd4, but if so, play it then. Not now. You've stabilized
white's center for him-- give him something to worry about!

Even simply prettping cd with Rac8 makes it a more powerful move, as it
threatens an eventual minority attack on the queenside if he plays exd,
and gives you the open file if he plays cxd.


16. Ne5 Bxe5
{Not a good move. I usually take the knight if
it's on a central square and I can't find a way to force it back. Of course,
I couldn't play Nxe5. Black will now have to spend 3-4 moves to put the
knight back into the game.}


I concur. A knight on e5 is a pretty scary thing, and your reaction
here is one a lot of players make. But the trick is to wait until
smoething specific is theratened, because what often happens is that the
pawn that ends up on e5 is worse-- it drives your primary kingside
protector (the f6 knight) away.

17.dxe5 Nh7 18. f4 Nhf8 19. g4 f6
{White was advancing the pawns
on the king side. This move wasn't necessary. It only weakens the
defense. Crafty suggests: 19... Ng6 but I was afraid of Bg3 followed by
f5.}


Yeah, but f6 creates it's own problems. exf6 Nxf6 and e6 is going to be
weak for a long time. exf6 gxf6 avoids that and gives you a nice central
pawn wedge, but your king is going to come under some heavy fire because
of white's better development.

I think that what you really need to be doing here is getting your
remaining pieces involved. I'd like to point out, for example, that your
a8-rook has not gotten involved in the game yet. You're essentially
playing a rook down, because while both of white's rooks are fighting
for control of the center, only one of yours is.

20. Nf3 Ng6 21. exf6 Nxh4 22. f7+ Kxf7 23. Nxh4 Nf6


I don't like this move because it, in my opinion, underestimates the
key weaknesses in your position: e5 and the e6 pawn. Your knight was
actually perfectly placed protecting that square. Qc7 should have been
considered, improving your control over that square which could well
prove to be a fatal weakness even into the endgame.

You find another way to protect that square, but you open up so many
lines against your king that white's superior major pieces become a huge
threat.

You have to beware of opening lines against your own king when your
opponent is better developed. One of the first principles of chess: open
lines favor the better-developed player!

24. g5 hxg5
25. fxg5 Ne4 26. Qh5+ Ke7 27. Rad1 Nc5
{I saw that 27...Nd6 would lose either the g-pawn to 28.Qg6.
White would then have two connected passed pawns and a
strong attack.}
28. b4 Nxa4 29. Nf5+ Kd7
{The game was lost, but I still had fighting chances. Better was 29.Kd8.
This move loses immediately. I saw only the fork with Nd6 and tried to avoid
it.
I should have thought deeper about the consequences of both moves.}
30.Qf7+ Kc6 31. b5+ 1-0


If it's any consolation, Kd8 also loses immediately to Qxe8+!
  #3  
Old February 20th 04, 08:40 PM
Marcus
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Posts: n/a
Default Analysis help

Thanks for your comments, Ron. They were very helpful.

"Ron" wrote in message
...


  #4  
Old February 21st 04, 04:44 AM
Mark S. Hathaway
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Posts: n/a
Default Analysis help

Marcus wrote:
Can anyone help me to analyze this game? General plans help more than simply
suggesting a sequence of moves. I included my own analysis and crafty
analysis so you can point where I'm thinking wrong.

This is correspondence chess, but I play as I would play over the board,
without books or moving the pieces on another board.


[Event "Casual Game"]
[Site "GameKnot.com"]
[Date "2004.02.18"]
[Round "-"]
[White "-"]
[Black "me"]
[WhiteElo "1632"]
[BlackElo "1628"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 e6

( { Crafty: } 2...Ne4 3. Bf4 c5 4. f3 Qa5+ 5. c3 Nf6 )

{ MSH: Common are 2...Ne4, 2...d5, 2...e6 }

3. Nf3

{ MSH: Also 3. e4 h6 4. Bxf6 Qxf6 }

3...c5

{ MSH: This is pretty much main line, but 3...h6 could
be better; not committing to the weakening that ...c5
causes until Bg5 commits to something.

The idea of ...c5 is to allow ...Qd8-a5+ or ...Qd8-b6
to break the pin on Nf6 with tempo. It also threatens
to get rid of one of White's central pawns. }

4. e3 Be7

{ MSH: 4...Qb6 5. Nc3 is interesting stuff, but not to be
tried by either White or Black unless they know it.

The Be7 isn't so great because of Bxf6 and ...Bxf6 c2-c3
when Bf6 is just a bad piece, biting on 'granite'. }

5. c3 b6

{ MSH: Now the position is quieter and there's time for
developments without so many immediate tactical things. }

6. Bd3 Bb7

{ MSH: 6...Ba6 is interesting. Bd3 is a huge weapon for White,
so trading it off is good. And, if 7. c4 then you have a
Queen's Indian Defense kind of position with White spending
an extra tempo to get there. }

7. O-O O-O 8. Nbd2 h6 9. Bh4 d5

{ MSH: 9...d6 is better, as it doesn't leave any weak
"holes" in the position and makes White change his
position to force some openings he might exploit. }

10. Qe2

{ MSH: Would you really aim to play e3-e4 now, afte you
already have use of e5? You also have to watch out for
...a7-a5 and ...Bb7-a6xd3. }

( { MSH: } 10. Ne5 { offers White an immediate way to
take advantage of the weak e5. It can be backed up
with f2-f4 or Nd2-f3. } )

10...Nbd7 11. Ba6

{ MSH: This just can't be good. What's to be gained by
trading-off the good B for the blocked Bb7?

Better is a2-a4 and ...Rf1-b1, b2-b4-b5 to squeeze
Black on the queen-side with pawns. }

11...Qc8

( { Crafty: } 11...Bxa6 12. Qxa6 c4 )

12. Bxb7 Qxb7 = 13. a4 Rfe8 14. Rfe1 cxd4 ?

{ MSH: Why allow White to open his e-file? More
piece play is required. }

( { MSH: } 14...Bd6 { preparing ...e6-e5 } )
( { MSH: } 14...Qc7 { controlling e5 to prevent Nf3-e5 } )

15. exd4 Bd6 ?

( { I was having trouble to form a plan here. Crafty: } 15...Rac8 )

{ MSH: That's because the e5 square is now in White's hands and
Black has a few problems: weakness with no compensating offense.

Bd6 is quite unfortunate. It actually allows White to use e5
without at least one minor piece trade.

I think the plan has to be to trade off some pieces to avoid any
White offense. To that end 15...Nh7 might be considered. }

16. Ne5 Bxe5

{ Not a good move. I usually take the knight if it's on a central
square and I can't find a way to force it back. Of course, I
couldn't play Nxe5. Black will now have to spend 3-4 moves to
put the knight back into the game.

MSH: Now Black has to defend well for some time. }

17. dxe5 Nh7

{ MSH: Fortunately for Black, in this position the White light-sq.
Bishop is gone and Bh4 is awkward. So, Black can still defend. }

18. f4 ?!

{ MSH: More to the point is Nd2-f3-d4, threatening possibly Nd4-b5-d6
or f2-f4-f5-f6 or just bringing rooks and queen to f3 & g3 to attack
Kg8 straight-on. One should approach these different plans flexibly
and choose the best path at the last moment. Black can do little
except wait. }

18...Nhf8 19. g4

{ MSH: This is way way overboard, gains nothing and might allow
Black to create some counter-play against the advanced pawns
or even Kg1. }

19...f6 ??

{ White was advancing the pawns on the king side. This move
wasn't necessary. It only weakens the defense.

MSH: Yes, it's very bad. You had some time to activate
pieces, to force trades to try to attack. Better was
19...Qc6 or 19...Rac8 or possibly 19...Ng6. }

( { Crafty suggests: } 19... Ng6
{ but I was afraid of Bg3 followed by f5. } )

20. Nf3 Ng6 21. exf6 Nxh4 22. f7+ Kxf7 23. Nxh4 Nf6 24. g5 hxg5
25. fxg5 Ne4 26. Qh5+ Ke7 27. Rad1

{ MSH: This prevents Black's king from running further because
of Rxe4. White could also be threatening the attack:
Qg6, forcing ...Rg8, Rxe4 ...dxe4, Nf5+ ...exf5, Qd6+
and Black's king is dead. This is no fun to defend for Black. }

27...Nc5

{ I saw that 27...Nd6 would lose either the g-pawn to
28.Qg6.
White would then have two connected passed pawns and a
strong attack.

MSH: maybe 27...Rg8, anticipating Qh5-g6 and also allowing
...Ra8-f8 to guard that side of the board even more. }

28. b4 Nxa4 29. Nf5+ Kd7

{ The game was lost, but I still had fighting chances.
Better was 29.Kd8. This move loses immediately. I saw
only the fork with Nd6 and tried to avoid it.
I should have thought deeper about the consequences
of both moves.

MSH: Ouch! It's probably time to resign.
29...Kd8 30. Nd6 wins an exchange after 30...Qe7
31. Nxe8 Qxe8 32. Qxe8+ Kxe8 33. Rxe6+ Kf7 34. Re3. }

30. Qf7+ Kc6 31. b5+

1-0
  #5  
Old February 21st 04, 10:43 PM
mdamien
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Posts: n/a
Default Analysis help

"Mark S. Hathaway" wrote in message
...
Marcus wrote:
Can anyone help me to analyze this game? General plans help more than

simply
suggesting a sequence of moves. I included my own analysis and crafty
analysis so you can point where I'm thinking wrong.

This is correspondence chess, but I play as I would play over the board,
without books or moving the pieces on another board.


[Event "Casual Game"]
[Site "GameKnot.com"]
[Date "2004.02.18"]
[Round "-"]
[White "-"]
[Black "me"]
[WhiteElo "1632"]
[BlackElo "1628"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 e6

( { Crafty: } 2...Ne4 3. Bf4 c5 4. f3 Qa5+ 5. c3 Nf6 )

{ MSH: Common are 2...Ne4, 2...d5, 2...e6 }

3. Nf3

{ MSH: Also 3. e4 h6 4. Bxf6 Qxf6 }

3...c5

{ MSH: This is pretty much main line, but 3...h6 could
be better; not committing to the weakening that ...c5
causes until Bg5 commits to something.


Interesting Mark -- I'd be interested in developments with 3. ... h6. MCO-13
dismisses the move as "wasted," citing Vaganian-Plaskett, Hastings 1982-83.
That was the edition out when I last looked at this line, which continued 4.
Bxf6 Qxf6 5. Nbd2 (5. e4 is also noted).

I do have more up-to-date volumes, so I'll look into it. I appreciate any
comments, nonetheless.

There are some interesting fluctuations in assessment on the move h6 in
other openings as well. In particular, I'm thinking of the Nimzo-Indian
Leningrad variation.

Matt


 




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