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Article: Kasparov on Chess Software



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 14th 03, 06:43 PM
Joe Nasal
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Default Article: Kasparov on Chess Software

I often think about chess as a "Turing Test". I enjoyed Garry's point of view on the subject:
Machines use 95 per cent calculation and 5 per cent so-called "positional understanding", which a machine inherits from its creators. Humans use 99 per cent intuition and 1 per cent calculation, but very often we come to the same conclusion. So does it mean that the machine's process is an imitation of human intelligence? Here, the game of chess raises an important issue: should we judge artificial intelligence by the machine's performance or by the result? I think it's more about the result. With my knowledge and my experience, I would say that a machine is not threatening. In fact, it helps me to go through preparation. Even with some grandmasters, unless you are really good, the machine will dominate you. Unless you understand how the machine functions, you will not be able to maximise the effect of working with the machine.

Can you tell the programs apart?

I can identify immediately Deep Junior or Deep Fritz. Every machine has its own character, undoubtedly. The machines' evaluation process is based on the priorities, and each set of priorities is different. If you place emphasis on one particular mode of play in the program as Deep Junior's program does, the machine gets more adventurous. If you have another style, you have different machine personalities. Today, any professional could tell Deep Fritz from Deep Junior in 10 to 15 moves. It's as easy as differentiating between Kramnik and Kasparov.

Has that changed over the years?

Deep Junior was a revolutionary program because it was the first time the programmers had tried to deal with material [the value of the pieces in play or captured] versus quality [strategic moves]. They tried to teach the machine to use some non-material priorities, which is a fundamental issue with a machine. It was the first program that could play without worrying about material. In game 5 of our match, it sacrificed a piece for attack. Attack is a concept that the machine was able to understand. Maybe it was not 100 per cent correct, but it's very difficult for a human to recognise that the machine is playing for compensation [giving up valued pieces for strategic gain]. Now other programs are trying to catch up because it is clear that unless the machine is capable of speculating, with these material/quality parameters it will be very difficult to make progress.

So different programs have "personalities"?

You could say so, yes. Machines are gaining personalities.





  #2  
Old July 14th 03, 10:49 PM
Gunny Bunny
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Default Article: Kasparov on Chess Software

Garry keeps referring to software as 'machines'... I am confused about that ?
"Joe Nasal" wrote in message ...

I often think about chess as a "Turing Test". I enjoyed Garry's point of view on the subject:

  #3  
Old July 14th 03, 11:05 PM
Dan Yobry
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Default Article: Kasparov on Chess Software

A given piece of software will run differently on different computer
configurations.

Por ejemple, I have Chess Tiger for my Palm Pilot. It's going to play a
noticeably different game on a brand new Sony Clie than it will on an old
Palm III. Because of this difference, it makes more sense to refer to the
whole package than it does the program.

Think of this, Deep Junior would be no match for Garry if it were running on
a lowly 486 with 16 megs of memory. The crappy hardware would limit what the
software could do, therefore changing it's "personality." However, give it
multiple processors and plenty of memory (along with excellent algorithms),
and the thing will play near perfectly every time.

That, or maybe he says "machine" because he's gay. It's your call.

-Dan

--
|| http://www.digital204.com (a Yobry production)
|| drop me a line at danyobry(at)comcast.net



"Gunny Bunny" wrote:
Garry keeps referring to software as 'machines'... I am confused about that
?


  #4  
Old July 15th 03, 04:57 AM
Russell Reagan
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Default Article: Kasparov on Chess Software

"Gunny Bunny" wrote

Garry keeps referring to software as 'machines'... I am confused about that

?

You're being too picky. By "machines" be means computers, whether they are
computers that are running software, or computers that are all hardware
based.


 




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