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  #1  
Old August 12th 03, 05:21 PM
floris
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Default linux

an interesting thought just occured to me regarding this issue: since
windows takes up a LOT of memory and linux to a much lesser extend (to my
knowledge anyway), would a chess engine be better performing on a linux pc
than a windows pc? what about apple??


"G. Filicetti" schreef in bericht
news
Hey guys,

I've got a question for everyone regarding playing, analyzing and storing
chess games on your computer if you happen to run Linux instead of

Windows.

It seems that all the major chess software out there is Windows-centric...
Chessmaster, anything from Chessbase, CT-ART, etc, etc,...

Of course I'm aware of XBoard, but I was just wondering how other chess
afficionados out there who happen to run Linux deal with the computer
aspects of their chess life... xboard is great for viewing PGNs, playing

on
ICS servers and getting your ass handed to you by GNU Chess, but what

about
analysis, database-ing, opening study, tactical problems, etc ?

Please relate your experience with "doing" chess on Linux,



--
Floris


  #2  
Old August 12th 03, 05:47 PM
Russell Reagan
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Default linux

"floris" wrote

an interesting thought just occured to me regarding this issue: since
windows takes up a LOT of memory and linux to a much lesser extend (to my
knowledge anyway), would a chess engine be better performing on a linux pc
than a windows pc? what about apple??


Memory consumption is not the primary limiting factor of a chess program.
Most programs don't need a whole lot of memory to play very well.


  #3  
Old August 12th 03, 06:57 PM
Kevin Croxen
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Default linux

In article , Noah Roberts wrote:

Of course I'm aware of XBoard, but I was just wondering how other chess
afficionados out there who happen to run Linux deal with the computer
aspects of their chess life... xboard is great for viewing PGNs, playing


on

ICS servers and getting your ass handed to you by GNU Chess, but what


about

analysis, database-ing, opening study, tactical problems, etc ?


SCID runs on Linux. I have never used the software you speak of for
windows, as I run Linux, but SCID seems pretty adiquate if not complete.
I don't like that it uses Tk but we can't go worring about the little
things all the time.


And Crafty running with Xboard remains pretty much the standard high-end
playing/analysis package for Linux.



Please relate your experience with "doing" chess on Linux,






  #4  
Old August 12th 03, 08:46 PM
Noah Roberts
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Default linux

Kevin Croxen wrote:
In article , Noah Roberts wrote:

Of course I'm aware of XBoard, but I was just wondering how other chess
afficionados out there who happen to run Linux deal with the computer
aspects of their chess life... xboard is great for viewing PGNs, playing

on


ICS servers and getting your ass handed to you by GNU Chess, but what

about


analysis, database-ing, opening study, tactical problems, etc ?

SCID runs on Linux. I have never used the software you speak of for
windows, as I run Linux, but SCID seems pretty adiquate if not complete.
I don't like that it uses Tk but we can't go worring about the little
things all the time.



And Crafty running with Xboard remains pretty much the standard high-end
playing/analysis package for Linux.


Crafty and XBoard are a good combination, but SCID is a full fledged
database that can also communicate with xboard compatable engines. One
thing I really like about Scid for analysis is that when crafty shows a
different/better line I can just press a button and it is placed in the
pgn text as a variant. I don't know if xboard can do that. The
database support is a definate benefit over just plain xboard though.

NR

  #5  
Old August 12th 03, 09:57 PM
Kevin Croxen
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Posts: n/a
Default linux

In article , Noah Roberts wrote:
Kevin Croxen wrote:
In article , Noah Roberts wrote:

Of course I'm aware of XBoard, but I was just wondering how other chess
afficionados out there who happen to run Linux deal with the computer
aspects of their chess life... xboard is great for viewing PGNs, playing

on


ICS servers and getting your ass handed to you by GNU Chess, but what

about


analysis, database-ing, opening study, tactical problems, etc ?

SCID runs on Linux. I have never used the software you speak of for
windows, as I run Linux, but SCID seems pretty adiquate if not complete.
I don't like that it uses Tk but we can't go worring about the little
things all the time.



And Crafty running with Xboard remains pretty much the standard high-end
playing/analysis package for Linux.


Crafty and XBoard are a good combination, but SCID is a full fledged
database that can also communicate with xboard compatable engines. One
thing I really like about Scid for analysis is that when crafty shows a
different/better line I can just press a button and it is placed in the
pgn text as a variant. I don't know if xboard can do that. The
database support is a definate benefit over just plain xboard though.

NR


No, XBoard doesn't do anything like that --it's not a database. It's just
a GUI front-end for various text-mode chess engines. One would normally
only combine this with Crafty for using the combination as a stand-alone
playing program in X. The combination was never intended to incorporate
the database functions that one gets, say, in a current version of Fritz
for Windows, though one can build enormous or specialized openings books
for Crafty from pgn databases. Moreover, since XBoard is written
specifically for Gnuchess, the combination of it with Crafty is not
completely seamless. But it certainly works well enough.

If you want Crafty to do analysis of games from databases, running it with
SCID is your only option on Linux. But certainly an option that meets or
exceeds the needs of 99% of the playing community.

--Kevin
  #6  
Old August 12th 03, 11:42 PM
Martin Andersen
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Default linux

floris wrote:

an interesting thought just occured to me regarding this issue: since
windows takes up a LOT of memory and linux to a much lesser extend (to my
knowledge anyway), would a chess engine be better performing on a linux pc
than a windows pc? what about apple??


If you are using the popular desktop environments KDE or GNOME, the
memory consumption is not lower in Linux.
Actually, chess engines are stronger in Windows than in Linux, due
to the fact that many commerical engines are only available for
Windows users. These engines have the top places in the SSDF rating list.

Martin.
  #7  
Old August 13th 03, 03:22 PM
Kevin Croxen
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Default linux

In article , Noah Roberts wrote:
Martin Andersen wrote:
floris wrote:


an interesting thought just occured to me regarding this issue: since
windows takes up a LOT of memory and linux to a much lesser extend (to my
knowledge anyway), would a chess engine be better performing on a linux pc
than a windows pc? what about apple??



If you are using the popular desktop environments KDE or GNOME, the
memory consumption is not lower in Linux.


I agree. One of my worst pet peeves about Gnome and KDE is the
exponential increase in memory footprint they have. I still use Gnome
(a slightly older version though) on my 750, but when installing Slack9
on my 233 neither desktop was really useable. XFCE works nicely though
and is actually nicer in many respects.


Occasionally a useful trick, if there are KDE/Gnome apps you actually
use and like, is that by loading the KDE/Gnome libraries you can run these
apps perfectly well on any of the "leaner meaner" X Windows managers. The
apps tend to run better than on the KDE/Gnome desktops, because the drain
of actually running the KDE or Gnome desktop is absent.



Actually, chess engines are stronger in Windows than in Linux, due
to the fact that many commerical engines are only available for
Windows users. These engines have the top places in the SSDF rating list.


This of course means nothing about the strength of an engine that runs
on linux vs. one running on windows. Just because the current set of
strong engines have the unfortunate handicap of only running on one very
bad (IMHO) operating system does not mean that they would not work just
as well if not better on Linux. Take an engine that runs on both and
they will perform similarly - it may run better on the system it was
origionally designed on, but not by much.

NR

NR

  #8  
Old August 13th 03, 07:11 PM
Noah Roberts
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Posts: n/a
Default linux

Kevin Croxen wrote:
In article , Noah Roberts wrote:

Martin Andersen wrote:

floris wrote:



an interesting thought just occured to me regarding this issue: since
windows takes up a LOT of memory and linux to a much lesser extend (to my
knowledge anyway), would a chess engine be better performing on a linux pc
than a windows pc? what about apple??



If you are using the popular desktop environments KDE or GNOME, the
memory consumption is not lower in Linux.


I agree. One of my worst pet peeves about Gnome and KDE is the
exponential increase in memory footprint they have. I still use Gnome
(a slightly older version though) on my 750, but when installing Slack9
on my 233 neither desktop was really useable. XFCE works nicely though
and is actually nicer in many respects.



Occasionally a useful trick, if there are KDE/Gnome apps you actually
use and like, is that by loading the KDE/Gnome libraries you can run these
apps perfectly well on any of the "leaner meaner" X Windows managers. The
apps tend to run better than on the KDE/Gnome desktops, because the drain
of actually running the KDE or Gnome desktop is absent.


Yes, I have more luck with Gnome apps doing that than KDE, but I manage
to run KWord relativly well in XFCE. The problem is that most desktop
apps actually start up all the desktop required programs when they load.
For instance the oaf and stuff...

 




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