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100 million FICS games



 
 
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  #21  
Old March 13th 17, 11:07 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Rainer[_2_]
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Posts: 29
Default 100 million FICS games

On 12/03/2017 23:32, raylopez99 wrote:
On Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 12:41:55 PM UTC-5, raylopez99
wrote:
On Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 12:31:41 PM UTC-5, Andy Walker
wrote:
On 22/02/17 14:07, Offramp wrote:
That was a good idea. I have three laptops and I and doing a
blundercheck with Stockfish 8 at 15 seconds per move.

OK; if games last 30 moves, 60 ply, that's 15 minutes per game,
or, with three invocations of Stockfish, 12 games per hour on
average, ...

Setting that up allowed me to see exactly how many games there
were in this interesting collection. It is much more than I
thought: 2,518,172,389.

..., totalling ~210,000,000 hours, ~9,000,000 days, call it
25,000 years. I hope the collection is *very* interesting ...!
You need to save a factor of 1t least 10,000 somewhere. If you
buy another 297 laptops, find another nine numpties with similar
set-ups, and allow Stockfish only 1.5s/m, you're about there.

-- Andy Walker, Nottingham.


Quantum computers will solve this in seconds. Please do keep up
with the literature, even when retired...

RL


This week's Economist has a special section on how quantum computers
have gone mainstream. Chess tree to be solved soon, to xyz moves,
depending on what kind of quantum computer you have (the more qubits
you have--which is hardware related--the more moves you can search; I
can see in the future the entire chess tree to say 1000 moves deep
being completed exhaustively searched with a top-of-the-line quantum
computer).

Science fiction says Andy Walker, but the poor chap, being retired
and retarded, doesn't keep up with the literature!

RL


Rubbish. Quantum computers are able to solve a limited subset of
computational problems efficiently. Playing chess is none of these problems.

Quantum computers will contribute as much to the solution of chess as
you--nothing.

Cheers,
Rainer
  #22  
Old March 13th 17, 04:57 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Offramp
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Posts: 3,162
Default 100 million FICS games

Based on information received from recent postings I

***I HAVE SUSPENDED THE FRITZ 5.1 BLUNDERCHECK
***OF THE 3,327,268,818
***GAMES

which are downloadable from my site.

It is obvious that in a few years the entire database will be analysable within a few seconds.
  #23  
Old March 13th 17, 07:46 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
RayLopez99
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Posts: 3,536
Default 100 million FICS games

On Monday, March 13, 2017 at 6:07:22 AM UTC-4, Rainer wrote:
On 12/03/2017 23:32, raylopez99 wrote:


This week's Economist has a special section on how quantum computers
have gone mainstream. Chess tree to be solved soon, to xyz moves,
depending on what kind of quantum computer you have (the more qubits
you have--which is hardware related--the more moves you can search; I
can see in the future the entire chess tree to say 1000 moves deep
being completed exhaustively searched with a top-of-the-line quantum
computer).

Science fiction says Andy Walker, but the poor chap, being retired
and retarded, doesn't keep up with the literature!

RL


Rubbish. Quantum computers are able to solve a limited subset of
computational problems efficiently. Playing chess is none of these
problems.

Quantum computers will contribute as much to the solution of chess as
you--nothing.

Cheers,
Rainer


Stupidity rains down on us. You, not a programmer like me, know nothing --NOTHING--about what you speak of. If you know how RLC analog computers work, and how they can solve second-order differential equations if you set them up correctly, you'd understand that programming a general purpose quantum computer is the same. You program the quantum computer to assume the state of the chess tree, maybe with one or more qubits representing legal moves (how many legal moves are there in chess per position? That would be your maximum number of qubits). They already have a dedicated quantum computer to solve the Traveling Salesman problem, which is an O(n!) complex problem (do you even know what Big-Oh notation means? Doubtful), and the chess tree is no more difficult than that.

And oh--big Oh--I have solved such problems and even more difficult problems in my professional capacity. As part of a team, but I have done it.

RL
  #24  
Old March 14th 17, 01:35 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Rainer[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 29
Default 100 million FICS games

On 13/03/2017 19:46, raylopez99 wrote:
On Monday, March 13, 2017 at 6:07:22 AM UTC-4, Rainer wrote:
On 12/03/2017 23:32, raylopez99 wrote:


This week's Economist has a special section on how quantum
computers have gone mainstream. Chess tree to be solved soon,
to xyz moves, depending on what kind of quantum computer you
have (the more qubits you have--which is hardware related--the
more moves you can search; I can see in the future the entire
chess tree to say 1000 moves deep being completed exhaustively
searched with a top-of-the-line quantum computer).

Science fiction says Andy Walker, but the poor chap, being
retired and retarded, doesn't keep up with the literature!

RL


Rubbish. Quantum computers are able to solve a limited subset of
computational problems efficiently. Playing chess is none of these
problems.

Quantum computers will contribute as much to the solution of chess
as you--nothing.

Cheers, Rainer


Stupidity rains down on us. You, not a programmer like me, know
nothing --NOTHING--about what you speak of. If you know how RLC
analog computers work, and how they can solve second-order
differential equations if you set them up correctly, you'd
understand that programming a general purpose quantum computer is the
same. You program the quantum computer to assume the state of the
chess tree, maybe with one or more qubits representing legal moves
(how many legal moves are there in chess per position? That would be
your maximum number of qubits). They already have a dedicated
quantum computer to solve the Traveling Salesman problem, which is an
O(n!) complex problem (do you even know what Big-Oh notation means?
Doubtful), and the chess tree is no more difficult than that.

And oh--big Oh--I have solved such problems and even more difficult
problems in my professional capacity. As part of a team, but I have
done it.

RL


More rubbish. You fail to understand the very fundamentals of quantum
computing. The following simple question will make it clear:

How do you verify the output of a (hypothetical) quantum chess solver?

You didn't think of it, right?

Cheers,
Rainer
  #25  
Old March 14th 17, 01:41 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Offramp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,162
Default 100 million FICS games

On Tuesday, 14 March 2017 00:35:16 UTC, Rainer wrote:

How do you verify the output of a (hypothetical) quantum chess solver?

You didn't think of it, right?


I think you are right.
***I HAVE RECOM
***MENCED ANALY
***SIS OF GAMES

  #26  
Old March 16th 17, 06:56 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
RayLopez99
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,536
Default 100 million FICS games

On Monday, March 13, 2017 at 8:35:16 PM UTC-4, Rainer wrote:
On 13/03/2017 19:46, raylopez99 wrote:
On Monday, March 13, 2017 at 6:07:22 AM UTC-4, Rainer wrote:
On 12/03/2017 23:32, raylopez99 wrote:


This week's Economist has a special section on how quantum
computers have gone mainstream. Chess tree to be solved soon,
to xyz moves, depending on what kind of quantum computer you
have (the more qubits you have--which is hardware related--the
more moves you can search; I can see in the future the entire
chess tree to say 1000 moves deep being completed exhaustively
searched with a top-of-the-line quantum computer).

Science fiction says Andy Walker, but the poor chap, being
retired and retarded, doesn't keep up with the literature!

RL


Rubbish. Quantum computers are able to solve a limited subset of
computational problems efficiently. Playing chess is none of these
problems.

Quantum computers will contribute as much to the solution of chess
as you--nothing.

Cheers, Rainer


Stupidity rains down on us. You, not a programmer like me, know
nothing --NOTHING--about what you speak of. If you know how RLC
analog computers work, and how they can solve second-order
differential equations if you set them up correctly, you'd
understand that programming a general purpose quantum computer is the
same. You program the quantum computer to assume the state of the
chess tree, maybe with one or more qubits representing legal moves
(how many legal moves are there in chess per position? That would be
your maximum number of qubits). They already have a dedicated
quantum computer to solve the Traveling Salesman problem, which is an
O(n!) complex problem (do you even know what Big-Oh notation means?
Doubtful), and the chess tree is no more difficult than that.

And oh--big Oh--I have solved such problems and even more difficult
problems in my professional capacity. As part of a team, but I have
done it.

RL


More rubbish. You fail to understand the very fundamentals of quantum
computing. The following simple question will make it clear:

How do you verify the output of a (hypothetical) quantum chess solver?

You didn't think of it, right?

Cheers,
Rainer


Wow you're denser than water Rainer. How you say? That's easy. If the output of a quantum computer assumes the state of the chess board, the value of the pieces at any given position would determine the potential of the position, and the results would flow naturally like water flows downhill. Example: the board position in a quantum computer shows all legal moves simultaneously. The best move to make is the one with the highest non-equilibrium in material for either Black or White. Example: equal position but mate in one means the 'mate in one' is the best move unless the other side can refute it, then, if not, it would be some other move. Possibly there's no best move that wins material so you pick a 'drawish' move (randomly, or using some trivial evaluation function, like centralize knights or rooks to open files). Unlike today's chess engine, there's NO NEED for an evaluation function, except a trivial one in the event there's no win of material move. No need because you're examining all moves in the chess tree, and depending on how much hardware you have, you can examine all the moves in the chess tree up to say 200 plies (if your quantum computer is powerful enough)..

Nobel prize in physics follows for me.

RL
  #27  
Old April 1st 17, 04:14 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Offramp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,162
Default 100 million FICS games

Please wait for an important announcement.
  #28  
Old April 1st 17, 04:22 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Offramp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,162
Default 100 million FICS games

I have decided to substantially increase the size of this database by including games from chess.com, lichess.com, chess24.com and playchess.com (chessbase). I think I will be able to download every game since 1997.

Details and filenames will follow soon.
  #29  
Old April 1st 17, 06:17 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Offramp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,162
Default 100 million FICS games

I have made an update.

Here is the torrent file for all recorded Internet chess games from January 1997 onwards.
The games have been converted into PGN format and each one has been played through and the score integrity has been checked. One game is incomplete: Huskisson1988354 v Shizekopf35477, FICS August 12th 2001: does anyone have the complete score?

Contents look like this:

Internet chess games
ICG-1997-01.pgn.bz2
ICG-1997-02.pgn.bz2
ICG-1997-03.pgn.bz2
.... etc ...
ICG-2009-08.pgn.bz2
ICG-2009-09.pgn.bz2
ICG-2009-10.pgn.bz2
.... etc ...
ICG-2016-12.pgn.bz2
ICG-2017-01.pgn.bz2
ICG-2017-02.pgn.bz2
ICG-2017-03.pgn.bz2

The total number of games is just over 19 trillion. If you have played internet chess over the last 20 years YOUR GAME WILL BE HERE!

The total download size is about 383Gb, zipped. Unzipped probably about 2.2 Yottabytes.

A valuable research tool for the aspiring chess master.
  #30  
Old April 1st 17, 10:42 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Offramp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,162
Default 100 million FICS games

A quick search through the whole torrent file reveals some surprising statistics.

There are, in all, 57,988,266,801 complete games. How many do you think begin 1. e4 e5 2. Ke2?

Answer: 112,810,711! (That's just an exclam, not factorial.)

That sums up the huge educational value of the database. Where else would you find out how to defend against this attack?
 




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