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Brilliant Blunders (or Unintentional Brilliancies)



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 21st 03, 03:11 AM
dan foley
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Default Brilliant Blunders (or Unintentional Brilliancies)

Some years ago I was paired with a CM in a weekend swiss and had a
most unusual game (I would give the score but can't find it). I
gambited a pawn in the opening, and got some compensation in the form
of piece activity and the bishop pair - but my opponent (seemingly)
defended well and began to stablize the position, forcing a queen
trade. I began to get nervous. At the critical moment of the game,
he exchanged pawns and I unthinkingly played the most obvious
recapture. Only then did I realize he could initiate an exchange
leading to a knight fork that won the exchange for him. Disgusted,
and believing I had just blundered, I thought about resigning. Then I
began to wonder , 'why isn't he just taking it?' . I began to
evaluate the position that would follow if he won the exchange and
realized that if he took the material I had a complete positional
bind. He had no way to develop any pieces at at all without losing
the exchange back (or more). I had no immediate win, but I would have
hated to play his position. He declined the exchange, but now had a
serious lag in development - which led to my winning the game. I
always felt funny about bragging about that exchange sac - I hadnt
seen it, and I thought it was a blunder at first. Still, it's kind of
a fun story. Does anyone have similar anecdotes about 'unintentional
brilliancies' or 'brilliant blunders' to share?
  #2  
Old July 21st 03, 07:41 PM
DDEckerslyke
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Default Brilliant Blunders (or Unintentional Brilliancies)

"dan foley" wrote in message
om...
snip

Playing 3/0 on ICC I'm forever mating by accident - you play a check as it's
the easiest move in a time scramble and it turns out to be mate. Last night
I went a step further and sacced (ie blundered) a queen for mate in 2 - I
bet my opponent thought I was a genius!

Underlying this is something that I remember discovering as a kid and having
a hard time convincing others of - there is an element of luck in chess: you
or your opponent can make a move which has unforeseen beneficial
consequences.

cheers

dd


  #3  
Old July 22nd 03, 08:36 AM
Harold Buck
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Default Brilliant Blunders (or Unintentional Brilliancies)

In article ,
"DDEckerslyke" wrote:

Playing 3/0 on ICC I'm forever mating by accident - you play a check as it's
the easiest move in a time scramble and it turns out to be mate. Last night
I went a step further and sacced (ie blundered) a queen for mate in 2 - I
bet my opponent thought I was a genius!

Underlying this is something that I remember discovering as a kid and having
a hard time convincing others of - there is an element of luck in chess: you
or your opponent can make a move which has unforeseen beneficial
consequences.


I wouldn't call it luck unless you resort to rolling dice to choose from
among several moves. If you pick the move, you have every right to the
good and bad consequences of that move even if you didn't see them all
when you played it.

Think how often you can't decide, but then you think, "Well, such and
such a principle says I should try to do X, and this move does that, so
I'll play it." You deserve the benefits associated with following the
principle along with the detriments of playing a move based solely on a
principle.


--Harold Buck


"I used to rock and roll all night,
and party every day.
Then it was every other day. . . ."
-Homer J. Simpson
  #4  
Old July 22nd 03, 01:31 PM
Bill Smythe
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Default Brilliant Blunders (or Unintentional Brilliancies)

"dan foley" wrote:
.... Does anyone have similar anecdotes about 'unintentional
brilliancies' or 'brilliant blunders' to share? ....


I suspect just about every tournament player has stories like that.

Here's one that comes to mind for me. My opponent won the exchange
brilliantly, with a sequence of moves that eventually led to a forced fork.
Unfortunately for him, my knight (for his rook) ended up being posted on the
6th rank, where it almost single-handedly tied down his entire army for the
rest of the game. I'm glad I didn't see, far enough in advance, that my
opponent was threatening to win the exchange.

Bill Smythe



 




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