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learning chess: how to use the computer opponent?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 10th 03, 09:06 AM
Christian Kongsted
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Default learning chess: how to use the computer opponent?

Hi Bob,
I can recommend a new book that I wrote on the subject:
http://www.badbishop.com/gambit/books/computers.html

Review:
http://www.iecg.info/reviews/mjblake...computers1.htm

Best wishes,
Christian


"Bob" skrev i en meddelelse
...
I am kind of coming back into the game from not playing in several years

and
was wondering a good method of teaching myself. I have been getting

several
books from the library to reacquaint myself with strategies and tactics as
well as getting a sound thrashing from computer opponents (namely
ChessGenius on the Palm) in my spare time.

One thing I was wondering, perhaps it may be a bit absurd to even ask but,
how is it best to use the computer to become a better player. Should I

keep
playing the computer over and over getting beat to a pulp and hopefully
learn SOMETHING from it through osmosis or should I drop the playing level
down to "easy" or time to "instant" and hope for the best? Should the
strength of the computer be weakened to allow "blunders" of sorts to give
the beginner (like myself) a sense of accomplishment? Or should it play

full
strength to allow the student to "learn the hard way"? Is there a "proper"
(boy, I like using quotes) way to best utilize a computer opponent while
learning from books?

If anyone have any remarks that may be helpful or could direct me to a
decent Web site on this matter, I'd appreciate it.

Thanks.

Bob




  #2  
Old September 14th 03, 12:20 PM
Mike Ker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default learning chess: how to use the computer opponent?

In article , "Christian
Kongsted" wrote:

Hi Bob,
I can recommend a new book that I wrote on the subject:
http://www.badbishop.com/gambit/books/computers.html

Review:
http://www.iecg.info/reviews/mjblake...computers1.htm

Best wishes,
Christian


"Bob" skrev i en meddelelse
...
I am kind of coming back into the game from not playing in several years

and
was wondering a good method of teaching myself. I have been getting

several
books from the library to reacquaint myself with strategies and tactics as
well as getting a sound thrashing from computer opponents (namely
ChessGenius on the Palm) in my spare time.

One thing I was wondering, perhaps it may be a bit absurd to even ask but,
how is it best to use the computer to become a better player. Should I

keep
playing the computer over and over getting beat to a pulp and hopefully
learn SOMETHING from it through osmosis or should I drop the playing level
down to "easy" or time to "instant" and hope for the best? Should the
strength of the computer be weakened to allow "blunders" of sorts to give
the beginner (like myself) a sense of accomplishment? Or should it play

full
strength to allow the student to "learn the hard way"? Is there a "proper"
(boy, I like using quotes) way to best utilize a computer opponent while
learning from books?

If anyone have any remarks that may be helpful or could direct me to a
decent Web site on this matter, I'd appreciate it.

Thanks.

Bob




Here are a few books on playing against a chess computer which might help you:

1) "Playing Computer Chess: Getting the Most Out of Your Game", Al
Lawrence & Lev Alburt

2) "How Computers Play Chess", David Levy & Monty Newborn

3) "How to beat your chess computer", Raymond Keene & David Levy

My advice would be to set your computer to the weakest level to start and
then gradually, as you get better and start winning more and more games,
to crank up the strength of your computer to match your improving skills.

Cheers,

Mike Ker

--
Mike Ker
Wildwood Systems Group
Fredericton, New Brunswick CANADA
Reply to: mker at nbnet dot nb dot ca
  #3  
Old September 15th 03, 04:31 AM
Bob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default learning chess: how to use the computer opponent?

Here are a few books on playing against a chess computer which might help
you:

1) "Playing Computer Chess: Getting the Most Out of Your Game", Al
Lawrence & Lev Alburt

2) "How Computers Play Chess", David Levy & Monty Newborn

3) "How to beat your chess computer", Raymond Keene & David Levy


Thanks. I'll look those books up as well.


My advice would be to set your computer to the weakest level to start and
then gradually, as you get better and start winning more and more games,
to crank up the strength of your computer to match your improving skills.


An article I just read said to do some practice sessions--not necessarily
complete games--and analyze those pgn files, figure out my weaknesses, and
then play some entire games with the computer at a level that beats me about
80% of the time. Right or wrong, that's what I'm trying until someone tells
me otherwise. Not too dissimilar from your suggestion. Thanks for the
advice.

bob


  #4  
Old September 15th 03, 09:27 AM
Christian Kongsted
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default learning chess: how to use the computer opponent?


"Bob" skrev i en meddelelse
...
Here are a few books on playing against a chess computer which might

help
you:

1) "Playing Computer Chess: Getting the Most Out of Your Game", Al
Lawrence & Lev Alburt

2) "How Computers Play Chess", David Levy & Monty Newborn

3) "How to beat your chess computer", Raymond Keene & David Levy


Thanks. I'll look those books up as well.


My advice would be to set your computer to the weakest level to start

and
then gradually, as you get better and start winning more and more games,
to crank up the strength of your computer to match your improving

skills.

An article I just read said to do some practice sessions--not necessarily
complete games--and analyze those pgn files, figure out my weaknesses, and
then play some entire games with the computer at a level that beats me

about
80% of the time. Right or wrong, that's what I'm trying until someone

tells
me otherwise. Not too dissimilar from your suggestion. Thanks for the
advice.

bob



Hi again Bob,
I read all those three books before writing my own book about computer
chess. The first one is for complete beginners, and not even especially good
for beginners. I was really dissapointed about it. The others are ok (the
second is more technical), but note that they are both older books, and
computer chess is developing so fast.

Best wishes,
Christian


 




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