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Old December 21st 09, 04:42 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

The 1957 Virginia State Championship

As a result of my posting about Claude Bloodgood and his claims to
have won various chess tournaments including the 1957 and 1958
Virginia Open, I pulled out an old copy of the Virginia Chess News
Round-up and found the cross table of the 1957 Virginia Championship.

As you can see, Bloodgood did not play. The tournament was won by
Irwin Sigmond. I do not believe that a tournament by the name of the
1957 Virginia Open was ever played. I played in the 1958 Virginia Open
and I played Bloodgood in that tournament. He won the game, but not
the tournament. The tournament was won by Stuart Margulies, who
defeated Eliot Hearst. By the way, Eliot Hearst resided in Virginia at
that time. (see how my photogenic memory for trivial facts comes in
handy) so Bloodgood could not have been the highest Virginia resident,
because Senior Master Eliot Hearst was.

As you can see, Anthony Pabon finished 7th with 5-2. I finished 31st
with a score of 3-4. I was only 12 at the time, not quite 13. I was
the only non-adult in the tournament. They had not invented scholastic
chess yet.

What I remember most about this tournament was the end. I had prepared
a special opening for my last round game. I was going to play, as
White, 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Qf3 .

I was studying that move when the word came that somebody had dropped
out and therefore I was going to receive a bye for the last round. I
was given a bye even though I had won two games because I had the
lowest rating and the lowest score of any player who had not received
a bye.

I cried. I really cried. That is the only time I ever cried at a chess
tournament. I never cried because I lost a chess game. The reason I
cried this time was that was my only chance to play. Lynchburg, where
I lived, did not really have an active chess club. The last of the old
members had died. I only got to play chess three times a year, the
Virginia Closed, the North Carolina Open and the Eastern States Open
or its equivalent in Washington DC. Thus, by receiving a bye, I would
not have a chance to play another game of chess until the following
Summer. It was not like today where there are tournaments every
weekend and one can always play chess online.

By the way, in my life I have never played the opening I prepared for
that game, 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Qf3 .

Sam Sloan
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/samsch...8268/item/list
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Old December 21st 09, 11:46 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

Well Sam you sure showing your age. Can you tell us when you were a
young man and there were 48 stars on the American Flag? Like to know
that story OLD MAN

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Old December 21st 09, 02:45 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

On Dec 21, 6:46*am, Forsythe wrote:
Well Sam you sure showing your age. Can you tell us when you were a
young man and there were 48 stars on the American Flag? Like to know
that story OLD MAN


There's a terrific story about Sam and the transition from the 48-
star flag to 49 stars. It happened in 1959, when the Alaska Territory
became the 49th state. Texas, which had long prided itself on being
the physically biggest state in the Union, and where Sam was living at
the time, was suddenly dwarfed in size by the vast Alaskan expanse.
Sam, never one to accept 2nd-best, decided to do something. He
hitched a ride up the Pan-American Highway, and finally made it up to
some small mining town in a remote part of the Yukon. Finding the
local bar, Sam stomped in and said "I just came in from Texas! I am
****ed and ashamed to be from the 2nd-biggest state in the Union, and
I'll take any initiation you got that will give me the right to be a
genuine Alaskan Sourdough!"
A grizzled miner looked up from his drink and said "Well, mister, if
you're serious, it's pretty simple. You got to do three things: you
got to chug down a bottle of rot-gut whiskey, you got to kill a
grizzly bear, and you got to make love to an Eskimo woman. You do
that, and you can call yourself a real Alaskan."
Undaunted by the prospective perils, and enticed by the sexual part
of the ritual, our Sam immediately replied courageously "All right!
I'll do it! Gimme the whiskey!" A bottle was passed to Sam, and he
chugged it down in seconds. Then, pulling up the hood of his fur-lined
jacket, he marched off into the darkness of a midnight blizzard to
fulfill the rest of his quest.
Sam was gone for hours. The locals were starting to get worried
about him, when finally they saw his dim outline approaching through
the still-heavy snowfall. As Sam came into view, they saw he was in a
dreadful state. His clothes were shredded, hanging in tatters. His
face and hands were covered in blood that streamed from deep
lacerations. One eye seemed about to fall out of its socket. He was
staggering, barely able to keep his feet. The locals gathered round,
staring in horror.
Somehow, more dead than alive, Sam managed to stumble back into the
bar, where he fell heavily into a chair. With his one good eye, he
fixed a steely glare on the group, paused a moment, then said: "All
right, godammit, where's this Eskimo woman I got to kill?"
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Old December 21st 09, 03:32 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

On Dec 20, 11:42*pm, samsloan wrote:
What I remember most about this tournament was the end. I had prepared
a special opening for my last round game. I was going to play, as
White, 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Qf3 .

I was studying that move when the word came that somebody had dropped
out and therefore I was going to receive a bye for the last round. I
was given a bye even though I had won two games because I had the
lowest rating and the lowest score of any player who had not received
a bye.

I cried. I really cried. That is the only time I ever cried at a chess
tournament. I never cried because I lost a chess game. The reason I
cried this time was that was my only chance to play.


B.S. You expect us to believe this crybaby stuff?

You cried because you received a BYE, allowing you to advance rather
than risk defeat? Most players, if this really happened to them,
would be glad, not sad. Better glad than mad, no?

Another SS lie, Waffen (in)San Sloan?

RL
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Old December 21st 09, 03:55 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

On Dec 21, 9:45*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:

Somehow, more dead than alive, Sam managed to stumble back into the
bar, where he fell heavily into a chair. With his one good eye, he
fixed a steely glare on the group, paused a moment, then said: "All
right, godammit, where's this Eskimo woman I got to kill?" --TK

I thought the punch line was: Where is this Grizzly bear I got to
kill. A typo?






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Old December 21st 09, 03:57 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

On Dec 21, 6:46*am, Forsythe wrote:
Well Sam you sure showing your age. Can you tell us when you were a
young man and there were 48 stars on the American Flag? Like to know
that story OLD MAN


Or what he was doing on that grassy knoll when JFK was kilt or what
hotel that was what he shared a room with Norman Whitaker.
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Old December 21st 09, 04:13 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

On Dec 21, 10:55*am, None wrote:
On Dec 21, 9:45*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:

Somehow, more dead than alive, Sam managed to stumble back into the
bar, where he fell heavily into a chair. With his one good eye, he
fixed a steely glare on the group, paused a moment, then said: "All
right, godammit, where's this Eskimo woman I got to kill?" --TK

I thought the punch line was: Where is this Grizzly bear I got to
kill. A typo?


No typo. If you thought that was the punch line, you don't get the
joke.
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Old December 21st 09, 06:44 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

On Dec 21, 11:13*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Dec 21, 10:55*am, None wrote:

On Dec 21, 9:45*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:


Somehow, more dead than alive, Sam managed to stumble back into the
bar, where he fell heavily into a chair. With his one good eye, he
fixed a steely glare on the group, paused a moment, then said: "All
right, godammit, where's this Eskimo woman I got to kill?" --TK


I thought the punch line was: Where is this Grizzly bear I got to
kill. A typo?


* No typo. If you thought that was the punch line, you don't get the
joke.


Sigh...that reminds me of a camel joke. Maybe I'll share it someday
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Old December 21st 09, 07:04 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 06:45:20 -0800 (PST), Taylor Kingston
wrote:


There's a terrific story about Sam and the transition from the 48-
star flag to 49 stars. It happened in 1959, when the Alaska Territory
became the 49th state. Texas, which had long prided itself on being
the physically biggest state in the Union, and where Sam was living at
the time, was suddenly dwarfed in size by the vast Alaskan expanse.
Sam, never one to accept 2nd-best, decided to do something. He
hitched a ride up the Pan-American Highway, and finally made it up to
some small mining town in a remote part of the Yukon. Finding the
local bar, Sam stomped in and said "I just came in from Texas! I am
****ed and ashamed to be from the 2nd-biggest state in the Union, and
I'll take any initiation you got that will give me the right to be a
genuine Alaskan Sourdough!"
A grizzled miner looked up from his drink and said "Well, mister, if
you're serious, it's pretty simple. You got to do three things: you
got to chug down a bottle of rot-gut whiskey, you got to kill a
grizzly bear, and you got to make love to an Eskimo woman. You do
that, and you can call yourself a real Alaskan."
Undaunted by the prospective perils, and enticed by the sexual part
of the ritual, our Sam immediately replied courageously "All right!
I'll do it! Gimme the whiskey!" A bottle was passed to Sam, and he
chugged it down in seconds. Then, pulling up the hood of his fur-lined
jacket, he marched off into the darkness of a midnight blizzard to
fulfill the rest of his quest.
Sam was gone for hours. The locals were starting to get worried
about him, when finally they saw his dim outline approaching through
the still-heavy snowfall. As Sam came into view, they saw he was in a
dreadful state. His clothes were shredded, hanging in tatters. His
face and hands were covered in blood that streamed from deep
lacerations. One eye seemed about to fall out of its socket. He was
staggering, barely able to keep his feet. The locals gathered round,
staring in horror.
Somehow, more dead than alive, Sam managed to stumble back into the
bar, where he fell heavily into a chair. With his one good eye, he
fixed a steely glare on the group, paused a moment, then said: "All
right, godammit, where's this Eskimo woman I got to kill?"



I once played in a band with a guy who wrote a song on that theme,
only it was to be a true Texan, you had to drink a case of Lone Star,
cut a record with Willie and make love to "Texas Lou". He tried to
sell it to the Austin Lounge Lizards, but they evidently didn't
recognize good product.
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Old December 21st 09, 11:08 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default The 1957 Virginia State Championship

On Dec 21, 9:13*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Dec 21, 10:55*am, None wrote:

On Dec 21, 9:45*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:


Somehow, more dead than alive, Sam managed to stumble back into the
bar, where he fell heavily into a chair. With his one good eye, he
fixed a steely glare on the group, paused a moment, then said: "All
right, godammit, where's this Eskimo woman I got to kill?" --TK


I thought the punch line was: Where is this Grizzly bear I got to
kill. A typo?


* No typo. If you thought that was the punch line, you don't get the
joke.


Making love to a Grizzly bear is not highly recommended.
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