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Old October 15th 11, 08:47 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871874516
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871874516

Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

Foreword by Sam Sloan

Andy Soltis wrote a column in Chess Life, or perhaps it was in the New
York Post where Grandmaster Soltis is the chess columnist, pointing
out the remarkable fact that Lev Polugaevsky was the ninth rated
player in the world, yet nobody had ever heard of him.

Everybody interested in chess has heard the names of Geller, Keres,
Petrosian, Tal, Korchnoi and Smyslov, yet if you mention the name of
Polugaevsky they will say "Who Dat?", even though Polugaevsky was
about equal in rating to those other players.

Polugaevsky defeated Tal and Mecking in matches. He qualified to the
candidates matches for the World Championship five times, a record few
had equaled, but he lost twice in matches against Korchnoi in the semi-
finals for the World Championship. He won two major international
grandmaster tournaments. He won two USSR Championships, in 1967 and
1968. Quite good for somebody whom nobody ever heard of.

It happened that I sat with Bobby Fischer as he analyzed one of
Polugaevsky's games. It was in Fischer's Hotel room in the Empire
Hotel in New York City. Fran Goldfarb arrived after I did, as I was
looking at chess games with Bobby. I think Fran was slightly perturbed
to find me there. She had hoped to see Fischer alone. Like many other
female chess players, she was hoping for a private meeting with Bobby
for a private lesson, if you catch my drift. Many top female chess
players would have loved to get knocked up by Fischer if only they
could get the chance, but he never let his guard down.

When Fischer started to play over the game by Polugaevsky, Fran
Goldfarb said that she would like to see another game. To this,
Fischer replied:

"I want to learn something too. This is a very important game because
it is by Polugaevsky playing the Polugaevsky Variation, his own
variation!"

As Fischer played through the game, Fran Goldfarb had the temerity to
suggest a couple of moves. The moves she suggested were ridiculous. I
was actually embarrassed by the weak moves Fran suggested. Of course,
she was only a Class B player, so more could not be expected. I was
careful when I was in the presence of the Great Fischer. I would only
suggest a move after checking it over and over again in my mind to
make sure it was at least not a major blunder and was somewhat
reasonable. I was not going to disgrace myself by suggesting a
ridiculous move to the Great Fischer, if I could avoid it.

Fischer would often ask me what move I would play in such-and-such
position. My objective when asked such a question was to suggest the
natural move, to play it safe. I would not suggest to the Great
Fischer one of those crazy moves that I actually play in tournament
games.

The main reason I am recounting this incident here is to point out
that Fischer held Polugaevsky in the highest regard. Even if nobody
else had heard of Polugaevsky, Fischer had certainly heard of him and
was deeply studying his games, and this was well before Polugaevsky
had come to be regarded as one of the strongest players in the world.

The curious question remains: Why is it that nobody ever heard of
Polugaevsky, even though he was rated in the top ten players in the
world for nearly two decades? Was it because he did not play wild and
crazy sacrificial attacks like Tal did? No, that could not be the
reason, because it is difficult to imagine a more wild and crazy
"defense" than his Polugaevsky Variation.

Perhaps it was because he did not play in the deadly dull positional
style like Petrosian and Karpov. No, that could not be the reason
either.

Perhaps it was because he never became World Champion. But Geller and
Keres never became world champion and every chess player has heard of
them.

I met Polugaevsky one time. That was when he gave a brief speech in
English at the FIDE Delegates meeting in Thessaloniki Greece in 1988.
He spoke about his idea for a world championship cycle, a subject of
interest to him as he was constantly one of the players in that cycle.

The Polugaevsky Variation goes like this:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 b5

This last move leaves the Black king nearly naked. It is an attempt to
seize the initiative. If White does not react strongly to it, Black
gains the advantage. However, it is a violation of principles, as it
neglects development. Most grandmasters played instead the simple
developing move, 7. . . . Be7 or else played 7. . . . Nbd7 or else
went for the poisoned pawn with 7. . . . Qb6.

Now, in this position, the most common moves are 8.e5 dxe5 9.fxe5 Qc7
10.exf6 Qe5+ 11.Be2 Qxg5, bringing us to this position:

Here Black is attempting to grab a pawn but he has only one piece
developed, his queen! Clearly a risky choice. Fischer did play the
Polugaevsky Variation one time and he won with it. Reshevsky played it
too, a strange choice for Reshevsky, a positional player.

Here is a typical game with the Polugaevsky Variation. As you will see
White threatens checkmate several times. Polugaevsky leaves his king
wide open to attack. It seems impossible for Black to survive, yet he
does survive and goes on to win the game.

Rodriguez Cespedes, Amador (2505) - Polugaevsky, Lev (2600) [B96]
Biel Interzonal Biel (17), 1985
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 b5 8.e5
dxe5 9.fxe5 Qc7 10.exf6 Qe5+ 11.Be2 Qxg5 12.Qd3 Qxf6 13.Rf1 Qe5 14.Rd1
Ra7 15.Nf3 Qc7 16.Ng5 f5 17.Qd4 Qe7 18.Nge4 h5 19.Nd6+ Qxd6 20.Qxa7
Qe5 21.Qd4 Nd7 22.Qxe5 Nxe5 23.Kd2 Bd6 24.Kc1 Ke7 25.Rfe1 Bd7 26.Bf1
Rc8 27.Kb1 g5 28.h3 h4 29.Ne2 Bc6 30.Nd4 Bb7 31.Bd3 Kf6 32.Bf1 Bc5
33.c3 Bd5 34.a3 Ng6 35.Rd2 Nf4 36.Ka1 Rg8 37.Nc2 g4 38.b4 Ba7 39.Ne3
Bxe3 40.Rxe3 gxh3 41.gxh3 Rg3 0-1

This book was first published in Russian in 1977 as Рождение Варианта
or "The Birth of a Variation" The first thing about this book is that
we change his name back. The original English Language edition spelled
his name Polugayevsky. Other spellings have been Polugayevskii. It is
difficult to understand why they keep changing the spelling of his
name. His name in Russian is Лев Абрамович Полугаевский. This
obviously transliterates to Lev Polugaevsky. It is difficult to
imagine what reason they might have had to add an extra Y to his name.
It also makes this book harder to find.

Lev Polugaevsky was born on 20 November 1934 in Mogilev in what is now
Belarus (White Russia). He died in Paris, France on 30 August 1995 at
age 60.

Sam Sloan
San Rafael California
USA
October 5, 2011


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871874516
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871874516
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Old October 15th 11, 09:12 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

On Oct 15, 12:47*pm, samsloan wrote:

Fischer would often ask me what move I would play in such-and-such
position. My objective when asked such a question was to suggest the
natural move, to play it safe. I would not suggest to the Great
Fischer one of those crazy moves that I actually play in tournament
games.

The main reason I am recounting this incident here is to point out
that Fischer held Polugaevsky in the highest regard.


No, Sam, you are trying to give the impression that you were a close
friend and adviser of Fischer and that he valued your opinion. This is
no different than the times you have claimed to have advised JFK
during the Cuban missile crisis, Ike on D-Day strategy, or Grant
during the siege of Richmond. As is well known, the only such person
who ever took your advice was Napoleon during the Russian campaign,
and we all know how that turned out.
  #3   Report Post  
Old October 16th 11, 05:53 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 103
Default Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

On 15 oct, 16:47, samsloan wrote:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871874516h...SBN=4871874516

Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

Foreword by Sam Sloan

Andy Soltis wrote a column in Chess Life, or perhaps it was in the New
York Post where Grandmaster Soltis is the chess columnist, pointing
out the remarkable fact that Lev Polugaevsky was the ninth rated
player in the world, yet nobody had ever heard of him.

Everybody interested in chess has heard the names of Geller, Keres,
Petrosian, Tal, Korchnoi and Smyslov, yet if you mention the name of
Polugaevsky they will say "Who Dat?", even though Polugaevsky was
about equal in rating to those other players.

Polugaevsky defeated Tal and Mecking in matches. He qualified to the
candidates matches for the World Championship five times, a record few
had equaled, but he lost twice in matches against Korchnoi in the semi-
finals for the World Championship. He won two major international
grandmaster tournaments. He won two USSR Championships, in 1967 and
1968. Quite good for somebody whom nobody ever heard of.

It happened that I sat with Bobby Fischer as he analyzed one of
Polugaevsky's games. It was in Fischer's Hotel room in the Empire
Hotel in New York City. Fran Goldfarb arrived after I did, as I was
looking at chess games with Bobby. I think Fran was slightly perturbed
to find me there. She had hoped to see Fischer alone. Like many other
female chess players, she was hoping for a private meeting with Bobby
for a private lesson, if you catch my drift. Many top female chess
players would have loved to get knocked up by Fischer if only they
could get the chance, but he never let his guard down.

When Fischer started to play over the game by Polugaevsky, Fran
Goldfarb said that she would like to see another game. To this,
Fischer replied:

"I want to learn something too. This is a very important game because
it is by Polugaevsky playing the Polugaevsky Variation, his own
variation!"

As Fischer played through the game, Fran Goldfarb had the temerity to
suggest a couple of moves. The moves she suggested were ridiculous. I
was actually embarrassed by the weak moves Fran suggested. Of course,
she was only a Class B player, so more could not be expected. I was
careful when I was in the presence of the Great Fischer. I would only
suggest a move after checking it over and over again in my mind to
make sure it was at least not a major blunder and was somewhat
reasonable. I was not going to disgrace myself by suggesting a
ridiculous move to the Great Fischer, if I could avoid it.

Fischer would often ask me what move I would play in such-and-such
position. My objective when asked such a question was to suggest the
natural move, to play it safe. I would not suggest to the Great
Fischer one of those crazy moves that I actually play in tournament
games.

The main reason I am recounting this incident here is to point out
that Fischer held Polugaevsky in the highest regard. Even if nobody
else had heard of Polugaevsky, Fischer had certainly heard of him and
was deeply studying his games, and this was well before Polugaevsky
had come to be regarded as one of the strongest players in the world.

The curious question remains: Why is it that nobody ever heard of
Polugaevsky, even though he was rated in the top ten players in the
world for nearly two decades? Was it because he did not play wild and
crazy sacrificial attacks like Tal did? No, that could not be the
reason, because it is difficult to imagine a more wild and crazy
"defense" than his Polugaevsky Variation.

Perhaps it was because he did not play in the deadly dull positional
style like Petrosian and Karpov. No, that could not be the reason
either.

Perhaps it was because he never became World Champion. But Geller and
Keres never became world champion and every chess player has heard of
them.

I met Polugaevsky one time. That was when he gave a brief speech in
English at the FIDE Delegates meeting in Thessaloniki Greece in 1988.
He spoke about his idea for a world championship cycle, a subject of
interest to him as he was constantly one of the players in that cycle.

The Polugaevsky Variation goes like this:

*1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 b5

This last move leaves the Black king nearly naked. It is an attempt to
seize the initiative. If White does not react strongly to it, Black
gains the advantage. However, it is a violation of principles, as it
neglects development. Most grandmasters played instead the simple
developing move, 7. . . . Be7 or else played 7. . . . Nbd7 or else
went for the poisoned pawn with 7. . . . Qb6.

Now, in this position, the most common moves are 8.e5 dxe5 9.fxe5 Qc7
10.exf6 Qe5+ 11.Be2 Qxg5, bringing us to this position:

Here Black is attempting to grab a pawn but he has only one piece
developed, his queen! Clearly a risky choice. Fischer did play the
Polugaevsky Variation one time and he won with it. Reshevsky played it
too, a strange choice for Reshevsky, a positional player.

Here is a typical game with the Polugaevsky Variation. As you will see
White threatens checkmate several times. Polugaevsky leaves his king
wide open to attack. It seems impossible for Black to survive, yet he
does survive and goes on to win the game.

Rodriguez Cespedes, Amador (2505) - Polugaevsky, Lev (2600) [B96]
Biel Interzonal Biel (17), 1985
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 b5 8.e5
dxe5 9.fxe5 Qc7 10.exf6 Qe5+ 11.Be2 Qxg5 12.Qd3 Qxf6 13.Rf1 Qe5 14.Rd1
Ra7 15.Nf3 Qc7 16.Ng5 f5 17.Qd4 Qe7 18.Nge4 h5 19.Nd6+ Qxd6 20.Qxa7
Qe5 21.Qd4 Nd7 22.Qxe5 Nxe5 23.Kd2 Bd6 24.Kc1 Ke7 25.Rfe1 Bd7 26.Bf1
Rc8 27.Kb1 g5 28.h3 h4 29.Ne2 Bc6 30.Nd4 Bb7 31.Bd3 Kf6 32.Bf1 Bc5
33.c3 Bd5 34.a3 Ng6 35.Rd2 Nf4 36.Ka1 Rg8 37.Nc2 g4 38.b4 Ba7 39.Ne3
Bxe3 40.Rxe3 gxh3 41.gxh3 Rg3 0-1

This book was first published in Russian in 1977 as Рождение Варианта
or "The Birth of a Variation" The first thing about this book is that
we change his name back. The original English Language edition spelled
his name Polugayevsky. Other spellings have been Polugayevskii. It is
difficult to understand why they keep changing the spelling of his
name. His name in Russian is Лев Абрамович Полугаевский. This
obviously transliterates to Lev Polugaevsky. It is difficult to
imagine what reason they might have had to add an extra Y to his name.
It also makes this book harder to find.

Lev Polugaevsky was born on 20 November 1934 in Mogilev in what is now
Belarus (White Russia). He died in Paris, France on 30 August 1995 at
age 60.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * San Rafael California
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * USA
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * October 5, 2011

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871874516h...SBN=4871874516


-His name in Russian is Лев Абрамович Полугаевский. This
obviously transliterates to Lev Polugaevsky. It is difficult to
imagine what reason they might have had to add an extra Y to his name.

Because the stress is on that "e", which is pronounced "ye".

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Old October 16th 11, 10:20 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

On Oct 15, 4:12*pm, Taylor Kingston wrote:
On Oct 15, 12:47*pm, samsloan wrote:



Fischer would often ask me what move I would play in such-and-such
position. My objective when asked such a question was to suggest the
natural move, to play it safe. I would not suggest to the Great
Fischer one of those crazy moves that I actually play in tournament
games.


The main reason I am recounting this incident here is to point out
that Fischer held Polugaevsky in the highest regard.


* No, Sam, you are trying to give the impression that you were a close
friend and adviser of Fischer and that he valued your opinion. This is
no different than the times you have claimed to have advised JFK
during the Cuban missile crisis, Ike on D-Day strategy, or Grant
during the siege of Richmond. As is well known, the only such person
who ever took your advice was Napoleon during the Russian campaign,
and we all know how that turned out.


Sloan's account is actually very believable. Fischer was far from
wealthy until he won the world championship, and Jackie Beers told me
he used to hustle games at at 50 cents a pop in th automat. I'm sure
with a modest amount of patronage Fischer would have been happy to see
Sloan or any of the other regulars on the New York Chess scene.
Fischer probably knew dozens of guys like this, of which Sloan would
logically have been one, given his age and long-term interest in
chess. I wouldn't say he stood out to Fishcer, but nothing Sloan said
here is that spectacular, or impossible.

Around that time, if you wanted to play chess in Manhattan, there were
the two main chess clubs, the Automat, Washington Square Park, Central
Park (not as strong as WSP), Tompkins Square Park, that little park on
Sixth and Third next to the basketball courts, or I would imagine,
Fischer's hotel room, where he probably welcomed many players. There
really weren't too many regulars there, and it was a very \small
community.

Is that game he showed the main line? It's been a while since I
played the white side of that variation.
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Old October 16th 11, 10:01 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default Sam, Spam, Sam

On Oct 16, 1:23*pm, Taylor Kingston wrote:
On Oct 16, 2:20*am, "

wrote:

Sloan's account is actually very believable.


* The truth or falsehood of this particular story is irrelevant. That
was not my main point. I was questioning Sloan's statement that "The
main reason I am recounting this incident here is to point out that
Fischer held Polugaevsky in the highest regard." The main reason Sloan
does pretty much anything is to draw attention to himself. I felt this
was no different.


See my grandfather's story in another thread.



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Old October 16th 11, 10:50 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

I wonder what Stan Booz, a/k/a NONE a/k/a feels he
accomplishes by postings like this. Here is a book by a famous chess
personality, one of the strongest players in the world. Why would a
1600 player like Stan Booz object to this posting?

Sam Sloan
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Old October 16th 11, 11:16 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,alt.chess
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Default Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

On 15/10/2011 20:47, samsloan wrote:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871874516
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871874516

Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

Foreword by Sam Sloan

Andy Soltis wrote a column in Chess Life, or perhaps it was in the New
York Post where Grandmaster Soltis is the chess columnist, pointing
out the remarkable fact that Lev Polugaevsky was the ninth rated
player in the world, yet nobody had ever heard of him.

Everybody interested in chess has heard the names of Geller, Keres,
Petrosian, Tal, Korchnoi and Smyslov, yet if you mention the name of
Polugaevsky they will say "Who Dat?", even though Polugaevsky was
about equal in rating to those other players.


Who are these people who've heard of Geller but not Polugaevsky? And who
regards Polugaevsky as being about equal to the other five?
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Old October 17th 11, 04:35 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2007
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Default Sam, Spam, Sam

On Oct 16, 5:01*pm, None wrote:
On Oct 16, 1:23*pm, Taylor Kingston wrote:

On Oct 16, 2:20*am, "


wrote:


Sloan's account is actually very believable.


* The truth or falsehood of this particular story is irrelevant. That
was not my main point. I was questioning Sloan's statement that "The
main reason I am recounting this incident here is to point out that
Fischer held Polugaevsky in the highest regard." The main reason Sloan
does pretty much anything is to draw attention to himself. I felt this
was no different.


See my grandfather's story in another thread.


ibid above
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Old October 17th 11, 06:27 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

On Oct 17, 1:23*am, Taylor Kingston wrote:
On Oct 16, 2:20*am, "

wrote:

Sloan's account is actually very believable.


* The truth or falsehood of this particular story is irrelevant. That
was not my main point. I was questioning Sloan's statement that "The
main reason I am recounting this incident here is to point out that
Fischer held Polugaevsky in the highest regard." The main reason Sloan
does pretty much anything is to draw attention to himself. I felt this
was no different.


You crazy or what? COMPLETELY demolished your
point, and you have the gall to come back with such a rebuttal,
buttal? Shows what a stubborn, intellectually dishonest prick you
are.

And you lost our correspondence game, don't you ever forget it.

RL
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Old October 17th 11, 12:00 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default Grandmaster Preparation by Lev Polugaevsky

On Oct 16, 5:50*pm, samsloan wrote:
I wonder what Stan Booz, a/k/a NONE a/k/a feels he
accomplishes by postings like this. Here is a book by a famous chess
personality, one of the strongest players in the world. Why would a
1600 player like Stan Booz object to this posting?

Sam Sloan


Perhaps because it is off topic in a forum for "news of international
chess organizations."
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