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Old August 16th 04, 08:08 PM
levellerman
 
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Default Old Benoni

I am in the process of changing my openings in reply to 1.d4
from 1..d5 (QG declined ) and I want to try Old Benoni ( 5..Ne7 )

1.d4-c5 2.d5-e5 3.c4-d6 4.Nc3-Nf6 5.e4-Ne7

Is there anyone who plays this opening line who is intrested in analysis
or in exchanging databases ?
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Old August 17th 04, 07:01 AM
Alain L'Huissier
 
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hello,

well, how can you play 5. ... Ne7 ???

do you mean 5. ... Be7 ?

Regards,

Alain

"levellerman" a écrit dans le message de
om...
I am in the process of changing my openings in reply to 1.d4
from 1..d5 (QG declined ) and I want to try Old Benoni ( 5..Ne7 )

1.d4-c5 2.d5-e5 3.c4-d6 4.Nc3-Nf6 5.e4-Ne7

Is there anyone who plays this opening line who is intrested in analysis
or in exchanging databases ?



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Old August 17th 04, 11:19 AM
Roman M. Parparov
 
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levellerman wrote:
I am in the process of changing my openings in reply to 1.d4
from 1..d5 (QG declined ) and I want to try Old Benoni ( 5..Ne7 )


1.d4-c5 2.d5-e5 3.c4-d6 4.Nc3-Nf6 5.e4-Ne7


Is there anyone who plays this opening line who is intrested in analysis
or in exchanging databases ?


Obviously, whatever opening you switch to, your losses won't be
caused by these specific openings.

Nevertheless I would say that in such a Benoni you will lose more
often than in most of the other well-known openings.

--
Roman M. Parparov - NASA EOSDIS project node at TAU technical manager.
Email: http://www.nasa.proj.ac.il/
Phone/Fax: +972-(0)3-6405205 (work), +972-(0)51-34-18-34 (home)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on
weather forecasters.
-- Jean-Paul Kauffmann
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Old August 17th 04, 07:30 PM
levellerman
 
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Default

"Alain L'Huissier" wrote in message ...
hello,

well, how can you play 5. ... Ne7 ???

do you mean 5. ... Be7 ?

Regards,

Alain



yes, I meant 5..Be7..in my native language is exactly the opossite
as it is in english
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Old August 17th 04, 07:38 PM
levellerman
 
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"Roman M. Parparov" wrote in message ...
levellerman wrote:
I am in the process of changing my openings in reply to 1.d4
from 1..d5 (QG declined ) and I want to try Old Benoni ( 5..Ne7 )


1.d4-c5 2.d5-e5 3.c4-d6 4.Nc3-Nf6 5.e4-Ne7


Is there anyone who plays this opening line who is intrested in analysis
or in exchanging databases ?


Obviously, whatever opening you switch to, your losses won't be
caused by these specific openings.

Nevertheless I would say that in such a Benoni you will lose more
often than in most of the other well-known openings.


I do not change it (QG) out of poor results ( I've played QG for 10
years )
but out of boredom.

However when one changes the opening one does have to expect poor
results for a while until he gets "adjusted".

This Old Benoni has the advantange of not being overanalyzed as is it
the case of the "new" Ben or the King Ind. albeit the ideas for
manouvering are alike because of the pawn structure. In addition you
have the Be7-Bg5 trick to exchange the bad bishop.

lev


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Old August 17th 04, 10:57 PM
levellerman
 
Posts: n/a
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This Old Benoni has the advantange of not being overanalyzed as is it
the case of the "new" Ben or the King Ind. albeit the ideas for
manouvering are alike because of the pawn structure. In addition you
have the Be7-Bg5 trick to exchange the bad bishop.

lev


As I study it ( some 30 games )and I've found that there are some more
ideas
specific to this 5..Be7 Benoni than exchanging the bad bishop.

a) playing a6 and b6 in response to the typical b4 assault that white
does on queen side and then use Ra7 to activate the rook and transfer
it , after f5, to Rg7 for king side attack

b) Ne8-g6-Ng7 followed by f5 ( that's the point of having Be7, the g7
remains free for Ne8-Ng7 and, in some varations, after f5 and e:f5
then Nf5-Nd4 )

c)if in response to the b) ideas white plays Bh6 pinning the knight
than
Nb8-Nd7-Nf6-Ng8 ! is a manouvre quite often seen

d) a different plan is just Nb8-d7-f8-g6 and then Nf6-h5-f4 postponing
the f5 attack until the f4 square is taken under control

Looks quite good so far. Black often manages to stop white's queen
side assault
, after all that's the point of playing c5 ! : blocking the queen side
and attack king side safely. If white fails to attack queen side than
black may attack there to with b7-b5

Well, that's if balck plays alone, for the moment I am looking for the
specifc bright side of this opening.
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Old August 17th 04, 10:58 PM
levellerman
 
Posts: n/a
Default


This Old Benoni has the advantange of not being overanalyzed as is it
the case of the "new" Ben or the King Ind. albeit the ideas for
manouvering are alike because of the pawn structure. In addition you
have the Be7-Bg5 trick to exchange the bad bishop.

lev


As I study it ( some 30 games )and I've found that there are some more
ideas
specific to this 5..Be7 Benoni than exchanging the bad bishop.

a) playing a6 and b6 in response to the typical b4 assault that white
does on queen side and then use Ra7 to activate the rook and transfer
it , after f5, to Rg7 for king side attack

b) Ne8-g6-Ng7 followed by f5 ( that's the point of having Be7, the g7
remains free for Ne8-Ng7 and, in some varations, after f5 and e:f5
then Nf5-Nd4 )

c)if in response to the b) ideas white plays Bh6 pinning the knight
than
Nb8-Nd7-Nf6-Ng8 ! is a manouvre quite often seen

d) a different plan is just Nb8-d7-f8-g6 and then Nf6-h5-f4 postponing
the f5 attack until the f4 square is taken under control

Looks quite good so far. Black often manages to stop white's queen
side assault
, after all that's the point of playing c5 ! : blocking the queen side
and attack king side safely. If white fails to attack queen side than
black may attack there to with b7-b5

Well, that's if balck plays alone, for the moment I am looking for the
specifc bright side of this opening.
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Old August 17th 04, 11:00 PM
levellerman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This Old Benoni has the advantange of not being overanalyzed as is it
the case of the "new" Ben or the King Ind. albeit the ideas for
manouvering are alike because of the pawn structure. In addition you
have the Be7-Bg5 trick to exchange the bad bishop.

lev


As I study it ( some 30 games )and I've found that there are some more
ideas
specific to this 5..Be7 Benoni than exchanging the bad bishop.

a) playing a6 and b6 in response to the typical b4 assault that white
does on queen side and then use Ra7 to activate the rook and transfer
it , after f5, to Rg7 for king side attack

b) Ne8-g6-Ng7 followed by f5 ( that's the point of having Be7, the g7
remains free for Ne8-Ng7 and, in some varations, after f5 and e:f5
then Nf5-Nd4 )

c)if in response to the b) ideas white plays Bh6 pinning the knight
than
Nb8-Nd7-Nf6-Ng8 ! is a manouvre quite often seen

d) a different plan is just Nb8-d7-f8-g6 and then Nf6-h5-f4 postponing
the f5 attack until the f4 square is taken under control

e) if white goes for 6.g3 variation than 6..h5 with sharp play

Looks quite good so far. Black often manages to stop white's queen
side assault
, after all that's the point of playing c5 ! : blocking the queen side
and attack king side safely. If white fails to attack queen side than
black may attack there to with b7-b5

Well, that's if balck plays alone, for the moment I am looking for the
specifc bright side of this opening.
  #9   Report Post  
Old August 17th 04, 11:01 PM
levellerman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This Old Benoni has the advantange of not being overanalyzed as is it
the case of the "new" Ben or the King Ind. albeit the ideas for
manouvering are alike because of the pawn structure. In addition you
have the Be7-Bg5 trick to exchange the bad bishop.

lev


As I study it ( some 30 games )and I've found that there are some more
ideas
specific to this 5..Be7 Benoni than exchanging the bad bishop.

a) playing a6 and b6 in response to the typical b4 assault that white
does on queen side and then use Ra7 to activate the rook and transfer
it , after f5, to Rg7 for king side attack

b) Ne8-g6-Ng7 followed by f5 ( that's the point of having Be7, the g7
remains free for Ne8-Ng7 and, in some varations, after f5 and e:f5
then Nf5-Nd4 )

c)if in response to the b) ideas white plays Bh6 pinning the knight
than
Nb8-Nd7-Nf6-Ng8 ! is a manouvre quite often seen

d) a different plan is just Nb8-d7-f8-g6 and then Nf6-h5-f4 postponing
the f5 attack until the f4 square is taken under control

e) if white goes for 6.g3 variation than 6..h5 with sharp play

Looks quite good so far. Black often manages to stop white's queen
side assault
, after all that's the point of playing c5 ! : blocking the queen side
and attack king side safely. If white fails to attack queen side than
black may attack there to with b7-b5

Well, that's if balck plays alone, for the moment I am looking for the
specifc bright side of this opening.
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Old August 18th 04, 12:24 PM
levellerman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

These are old posts of this group on 5..Be7 Benoni ( Czech Benoni )
great stuff
.....................


Even if you're not interested in playing this opening as Black, or you
won't
play against it as White, it still might be interesting to see some ideas
that can be played in closed positions like this.

Feel free to email me at " if you have any questions
or comments.

Rajlich (2250) - Ashton (2145) [A56]
Midwest Class Midwest Class, 1997
[Ashton,J]

1.d4?!

I have to admit that I was quite suprised to see Vas play 1.d4, being the
devoted 1.e4 player he is. I prepared the French Defense for him, knowing
that he was probably going to play the Milner-Barry gambit, which I did not
and still do not trust. After the game, he said he played 1.d4 because he
was afraid that I prepared the Accelerated Dragon for him, and he did not
feel comfortable going into it.

1...Nf6
2.c4 c5
3.d5 e5
The Czech Benoni. I have had great results playing the Czech Benoni, mainly
because my opponents don't know it, and it can actually be quite dangerous.
I was quite happy to play it against Vas, since he would be the strongest
player I've played it against, so I thought it would be a good test. I
assumed that he prepared a line against it, since he knew I would play it.

4.Nc3 d6
5.e4 Be7
6.Bd3
I was happy to see this move, since I don't think it is very testing. A
more
annoying setup is for white to play g3, Bg2, and eventually play for f4.
This can be double edged, but I think if it is played carefully, it is
definitely the best way to meet the Czech Benoni.

6...Nbd7
Black plans to play an immediate Nf8 and Ng6, hoping to get some kingside
play with Nf4. Black will also have the possibility of castling kingside,
playing Ne8, and Bg5, trying to trade off the bad dark squared bishop.
Another idea for black is to play 7.. Na6, with the idea of Nc7, and
playing
for b5. I was taught to play Nd7-Nf8-Ng6, and I have always played the
opening this way.

7.Nf3 ..Nf8
8.Qe2?!
I don't think this move is very good. When Vas played it, I assumed his
idea
was to castle queenside, and attack me on the kingside, which he likes to
do. One problem with this idea is, black can leave his king in the center,
since the position is so closed, meanwhile trying to play for a quick b5.
Also, to push pawns on the kingside is not so easy. An h3 g4 advance would
be met by h6, Nh7 and Bg5!

8...Ng6
9.g3?! This move seems somewhat natural. The idea is to keep the knight out
of f4, and to play for f4 eventually, though I don't think it is good due
to
technical reasons.

9...Bh3!
This move will keep white's king in the center, thus making f4 harder to
play. I had to choose between playing Bh3, and the passive Bd7.

10.Ng5
This was the critical move I had to look at before playing Bh3.

10...Bg4!
11.f3 Bd7
Now that white has played f3, his kingside is a bit loose. His knight is
currently in danger of being lost by h6, so he has to answer that threat.

12.h4?? Well, Vas stopped me from winning his knight, though this natural
looking move loses. White's best move is 12.Qg2, just to play Nh3 after h6.
If 12.f4?! exf4 13.gxf4 h6 14.e5 (14.Nf3 Nh5! will give black a clear
advantage.) 14.. hxg5 15.exf6 gxf6, and black is better.

12...h6
13.Nh3 Nh5!
And its over..

14.Qh2
After thinking for almost an hour, Vas plays this move. There is no way he
can avoid the loss of two pawns and a walking king. 14. Kf2 is not playable
due to 14.. Bxh4!
14...Nxg3
15.Rg1 Nh5
16.Be3 Bxh3
17.Qxh3 Ngf4
18.Qf1 Bxh4+
19.Kd1 Nxd3
20.Qxd3 Bg5
21.Bf2

Black went on to win.

One thing this game shows is that in these closed positions, it's not so
easy to just push pawns around your king. White has to always prepare moves
like f4, or h4 carefully, or he will get in trouble.

Like I said in my notes, I think the best way to play against the Czech
Benoni is with the g3, Bg2 setup. The g1 knight should be developed to e2
usually. Exf4 will almost always be the way for black to meet f4, or white
will go on to play f5. Keep in mind that playing f4 against the Czech
Benoni, without playing g3 is usually positionally incorrect, since black
will get the e5 square. Here's a line I see a lot in blitz, which is no
good
for white, because he gives up the e5 square.

1.d4 Nf6
2.c4 c5
3.d5 e5
4.Nc3 d6
5.e4 Be7
6.Bd3 Nbd7
7.Nge2 Nf8
8.0-0 Ng6
9.f4 exf4
10.Nxf4 Ne5!

And Black stands better. Black will always have control of e5. He can
simply
play 0-0, Re8, Nd7 and Bf6. Black is very comfortable in this position, and
White has nothing to do.

White can also try the plan of Ne2-Ng3-Nf5. Here is a game that illustrates
this idea.
This game was played on the Internet Chess Club for a strong knockout
tournament. GM Kaidanov was White, and IM Ben Finegold was Black. The
ratings listed are ICC ratings.

[Kaidanov (2597) vs. BPF (2576) --- Mon Oct 07, 19:04 EDT, 1996]
[Rated standard match, initial time: 25 minutes, increment: 10 seconds]

1. d4 {0:17} Nf6 {0:22}
2. c4 {0:07} c5 {0:03}
3. d5 {0:06} e5 {0:03}
4. Nc3 {0:11} d6 {0:02}
5. e4 {0:06} Be7 {0:06}
6. Nge2 {1:01} Nbd7 {1:12}
7. Ng3 {0:03} g6 {0:07}
8. Bh6 {0:18} Bf8 {0:54}
9. Qd2 {0:19} Bxh6 {0:15}
10. Qxh6 {0:04} Ng4 {0:49}
11. Qd2 {0:05} h5 {0:32}
12. Be2 {0:09} a6 {2:25}
13. a4 {4:37} Qf6 {2:35}
14. f3 {1:53} Nh6 {1:58}
15. Nf1 {0:04} g5 {2:07}
16. Ne3 {0:07} Nf8 {0:26}
17. a5 {0:08} Ng6 {0:26}
18. Na4 {0:24} Rb8 {2:10}
19. Rb1 {1:15} Nf4 {3:29}
20. b4 {1:50} cxb4 {0:44}
21. Rxb4 {0:07} g4 {0:55}
22. c5 {1:11} dxc5 {5:16}
23. Rb6 {0:05} Qg5 {0:56}
24. Nxc5 {0:18} O-O {0:29}
25. Nxa6 {1:50} gxf3 {0:07}
26. Bxf3 {0:13} Ra8 {0:22}
27. Nc5 {0:37} Bg4 {0:20}
28. O-O {0:32} Rfc8 {0:12}
29. Nxb7 {0:38} Bxf3 {0:09}
30. Rxf3 {0:05} Rc1+ {0:04}
31. Kf2 {2:10} Ng4+ {0:02}
32. Nxg4 {0:06} hxg4 {0:01}
33. Rg3 {2:06} Rac8 {0:30}
34. Rc6 {0:19} Rc8xc6 {0:17}
35. dxc6 {0:04} Rxc6 {0:06}
36. Qd8+ {0:13} Qxd8 {0:01}
37. Rxg4+ {0:22} Kf8 {0:07}
38. Nxd8 {0:05} Rc2+ {0:13}
39. Kg3 {2:22} Ke7 {0:02}
40. a6 {0:30} Rxg2+ {0:16}
41. Kf3 {0:05} Ra2 {0:14}
42. a7 {0:32} Ra3+ {0:02}
43. Kf2 {0:05} Ra2+ {0:02}
44. Ke1 {2:14} Ng6 {0:02}
45. Nc6+ {1:04} Kd6 {0:01}
46. Nb4 {0:16} Rxa7 {0:03}
47. Nd3 {0:08} Ra2 {0:27}
48. h3 {0:10} Nf4 {0:39}
49. Nxf4 {0:05} exf4 {0:01}
50. Rxf4 {0:01} Ke5 {0:01}
51. Rxf7 {1:02} Kxe4 {0:02}
52. Kf1 {0:03} Rh2 {0:06}
53. Rh7 {0:04} Kf3 {0:06}
54. Kg1 {0:10} Rg2+ {0:04}
55. Kh1 {0:08} Rg8 {0:14}
{Game drawn by mutual agreement} 1/2-1/2

In my opinion, the Czech Benoni is very good for practical reasons, though
not very sound if white knows what he's doing. Out of 11 games, I only gave
up one draw, and won the rest. Out of several A-players, Experts, and one
master, I haven't played against the testing plans. I don't want to rely on
the Czech Benoni as my main opening because I don't trust it, but I'll
continue to play it every once in a while, just to make the game
interesting.

If you are interested in learning more about the opening, you might want to
look at some of the games of Yasser Seirawon, and Ben Finegold. If you have
any questions, just email me or the group.



--Jeff Ashton


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
David Hanley wrote:

BobFuller wrote:

In article ,

(David Washburn) writes:

Folks, I'm looking for a fairly sharp and interesting opening to learn
for playing as Black after 1. d4. Someone has suggested the Benoni
(Czech Benoni in particualr) to me, and I was wondering whether anyone
played it and could give me their opinions of it. Thanks in advance!
Dave



OK, what makes the Czech Benoni different from the other vareations of
the
Modern Benoni? This is the first I heard of it.


e5 instead of e6. I wouldn't exactly call it dynamic; if white
reacts appropriately, black should be fairly passive.

dave


IMO it's an extremely interesting defence! Hartston wrote an
inspiring chapter on it in his Benoni book published back in the
70's. Since he played the Czech Benoni himself, he gave the
defence a very sympathetic treatment. The CB got a bad reputation
after Spassky hammered it in spectacular fashion a few times.
Probably the first setup Black needs to prepare against is the
one where White plays Bd3, h3, g4 and 0-0-0 (sometimes White
leaves his king in the center and connects his rooks with Ke2).
That's generally considered White's most aggressive line. About
10 years ago, the CB had a mini-resurgence and was tried by a
few top players, such as Miles, Seirawan and Ivanchuk. Miles
came to grief with it a couple times in his short match vs.
Kasparov, but the consensus was that Black got out of the opening
okay and was only outplayed later on.

There are lots of stock ideas for Black. He usually plays for
....f5, and goes about it with the sequence ...0-0, ...Ne8, ...g6
and ...Ng7, followed by ...f5. In other words, he fianchettos
his knight! If White reacts to ...g6 with Bh6, Black will play
....Ng7, followed by ...Kh8 and ...Nd7-f6-g8 to "expel" the White
bishop. For some reason, I've always found that idea attractive.
Then there are cases where Black can exchange his bad Be7 with a
timely ...Bg5 (sometimes after playing ...Bg4xNf3).

You might want to look at The Chess Gladiator by Asa Hoffman,
published by ICE. He's played the Czech Benoni for years.

Charles
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