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Old August 23rd 04, 03:07 PM
sathya_me
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is my way of practice correct (help)

Dear NG,
I first apology for my cross postings to different news groups.

Since I wanted to become a serious player following are the way I
practice at home:

1)Playing one and half hour games with Deep fritz-8 by setting up the
Opening training mode
and learning the Specified line. I definitely loose but each time It
shows me to play the correct position.

2) I will solve some 20 middle game problem from Middle game encyclopedia.

3) 20 end game problems from chess cafe archives and taking 10 ending
positions
from the data base comes along with the Deep fritz-8 CD's endgame
classifications.

4) Playing a game in the solitary chess (i.e. not looking at a game's
next move or hiding the next move)

My doubt is shall continue with the above way of practice or practice
any one of the above with full time
attention. I mean to say , first solve all the middle game problems from
available sources and go for end game problems,
giving little attention to the playing game with deep fritz-8 .

Hoping to get help.
Sincerely,
N.Sathyashrayan


--

"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)

  #2   Report Post  
Old August 24th 04, 12:59 AM
EZoto
 
Posts: n/a
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On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 19:37:33 +0530, sathya_me
wrote:

Dear NG,
I first apology for my cross postings to different news groups.

Since I wanted to become a serious player following are the way I
practice at home:

1)Playing one and half hour games with Deep fritz-8 by setting up the
Opening training mode
and learning the Specified line. I definitely loose but each time It
shows me to play the correct position.


Play gambits. It will help your tactical vision especially with Fritz
and also play your favorite openings. Don't just play anything. If
you like the Grunfeld for example then play it from both sides.

2) I will solve some 20 middle game problem from Middle game encyclopedia.


Nothing wrong here

3) 20 end game problems from chess cafe archives and taking 10 ending
positions
from the data base comes along with the Deep fritz-8 CD's endgame
classifications.


Go just for King and Pawn endgames first, then ( just my opinion )
King, Rook and pawn endgames.

4) Playing a game in the solitary chess (i.e. not looking at a game's
next move or hiding the next move)


Can't offer an opinion on this. Some like it and some don't.

My doubt is shall continue with the above way of practice or practice
any one of the above with full time
attention. I mean to say , first solve all the middle game problems from
available sources and go for end game problems,
giving little attention to the playing game with deep fritz-8 .


Whatever works best but the most important thing is to have fun. I
just gave some very basic stuff but no matter how strong your computer
is you still have to read a couple of books. My System from
Nimzowitcsh, Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy by Watson. These 2
books are must haves if you want to start learning chess in depth.
Then ( again my opinion ) Understanding chess move by move by Nunn.
If you want to study a tournament book then get Zurich 1953 by
Bronstein. If you want to study a player then get Fire on Board by
Shirov ( great book ). If you want to study a World Championship
Match then get Tal - Botvinnik 1960 by Mikhail Tal.

Hoping to get help.


Hope it helps.

Sincerely,
N.Sathyashrayan


EZoto
  #3   Report Post  
Old August 24th 04, 03:04 AM
sathya_me
 
Posts: n/a
Default



EZoto wrote:

On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 19:37:33 +0530, sathya_me
wrote:



Dear NG,
I first apology for my cross postings to different news groups.

Since I wanted to become a serious player following are the way I
practice at home:

1)Playing one and half hour games with Deep fritz-8 by setting up the
Opening training mode
and learning the Specified line. I definitely loose but each time It
shows me to play the correct position.



Play gambits. It will help your tactical vision especially with Fritz
and also play your favorite openings. Don't just play anything. If
you like the Grunfeld for example then play it from both sides.


Never thought about the Idea. Thanks.



2) I will solve some 20 middle game problem from Middle game encyclopedia.



Nothing wrong here



3) 20 end game problems from chess cafe archives and taking 10 ending
positions
from the data base comes along with the Deep fritz-8 CD's endgame
classifications.



Go just for King and Pawn endgames first, then ( just my opinion )
King, Rook and pawn endgames.


Doing exactly the same. Thanks again.



4) Playing a game in the solitary chess (i.e. not looking at a game's
next move or hiding the next move)



Can't offer an opinion on this. Some like it and some don't.



My doubt is shall continue with the above way of practice or practice
any one of the above with full time
attention. I mean to say , first solve all the middle game problems from
available sources and go for end game problems,
giving little attention to the playing game with deep fritz-8 .



Whatever works best but the most important thing is to have fun. I
just gave some very basic stuff but no matter how strong your computer
is you still have to read a couple of books. My System from
Nimzowitcsh, Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy by Watson. These 2
books are must haves if you want to start learning chess in depth.
Then ( again my opinion ) Understanding chess move by move by Nunn.
If you want to study a tournament book then get Zurich 1953 by
Bronstein. If you want to study a player then get Fire on Board by
Shirov ( great book ). If you want to study a World Championship
Match then get Tal - Botvinnik 1960 by Mikhail Tal.


Don't have any of the above mentioned books. Thanks for mentioning.



Hoping to get help.



Hope it helps.



Sincerely,
N.Sathyashrayan



EZoto



--
"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)

  #4   Report Post  
Old August 24th 04, 12:32 PM
Henri Arsenault
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , EZoto
wrote:


Whatever works best but the most important thing is to have fun. I
just gave some very basic stuff but no matter how strong your computer
is you still have to read a couple of books. My System from
Nimzowitcsh, Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy by Watson. These 2
books are must haves if you want to start learning chess in depth.
Then ( again my opinion ) Understanding chess move by move by Nunn.
If you want to study a tournament book then get Zurich 1953 by
Bronstein. If you want to study a player then get Fire on Board by
Shirov ( great book ). If you want to study a World Championship
Match then get Tal - Botvinnik 1960 by Mikhail Tal.

Goo recommendations, but as one who has dozens of chess books, I find it
easier to study from computers. For tactics, programs like Convekta's
CT-ART3 or some of the Chess Mentor series (both have free demos - but I
like CT-ART3 best), and for strategy, the interactive lectures with voice
comments such as Josh Waitzkin's tutorials on Chessmaster or the free
online videos on ChessFM are great.

Most books cannot have diagrams for every move, but with computers, you
can not only see every move, but call up a strong program to study
alternate lines.

But it is important to now that the study that makes the most impact is
TACTICS. There is little point in gaining an advantage from the opening if
youare unable to exploit the tactical opportunities that arise after the
opening.

Henri
  #5   Report Post  
Old August 24th 04, 06:00 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 19:37:33 +0530, sathya_me
wrote:

Dear NG,
I first apology for my cross postings to different news groups.

Since I wanted to become a serious player following are the way I
practice at home:

1)Playing one and half hour games with Deep fritz-8 by setting up the
Opening training mode
and learning the Specified line. I definitely loose but each time It
shows me to play the correct position.

2) I will solve some 20 middle game problem from Middle game encyclopedia.

3) 20 end game problems from chess cafe archives and taking 10 ending
positions
from the data base comes along with the Deep fritz-8 CD's endgame
classifications.

4) Playing a game in the solitary chess (i.e. not looking at a game's
next move or hiding the next move)

My doubt is shall continue with the above way of practice or practice
any one of the above with full time
attention. I mean to say , first solve all the middle game problems from
available sources and go for end game problems,
giving little attention to the playing game with deep fritz-8 .

Hoping to get help.
Sincerely,
N.Sathyashrayan


--

"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)


This form of study is a good start, when you don't know your strengths
and weaknesses (especially when you haven't yet created areas you are
strong in). After a while though it will be more efficient to focus
your study.

I would start playing games at a slow time control (shortest control =
game in 60 minutes) against opponents that have ratings 0 to 200
points higher than you.

At home annotate each game thoroughly to find all of the points in the
game where you played a less than best move. Be sure to look for
points where you made an inferior move, but your opponent did not find
the best reply. The best annotation of each game has three steps:
1. Do the annotation yourself (or with your opponent) preferably
right after the game has finished when you still remember what you
were thinking during the game. Write down your thoughts that
occurred during the game as best you remember them:
* What was the principal variation that you expected after each

of your moves?
* Which of your opponent's moves surprised you?
* What alternative moves did you consider and why did you
reject them?
* What evaluation (+-, +/-, +/=, =. =/+, -/+, -+) did you give
positions during the game and why?
* Who deviated first from standard opening theory? Was the
deviation any good? Why was it good or bad?
Later add alternative variations that did not occur to you during the
game, but came to you afterwards.
2. Let Fritz annotate the annotated game using blunder-check and
letting it have 1-2 minutes for each move of the side (white or black)
that you played. Fritz is very good at finding mistakes you made in
either in the game or in the annotations that are purely tactical.
For the positions that Fritz pointed better moves, play over those
positions to make sure that you both understand and agree with Fritz'
evaluation. [Sometimes chess programs incorrectly evaluate the
compensation for gambits and sacrifices.]
3. Ask someone of master strength to help annotate the game to find
places where you made positional mistakes. [You may need to hire a
master (as a coach) if you cannot find anyone willing to volunteer
their time.]

The results of all this work annotating your games will be to identify
areas that you are weakest at. Some of those areas will be related
to specific parts of chess knowledge (e.g. How to play for advantage
when you have an isolated queen pawn? When your opponent has one?
What is the best plan when up a pawn with rooks on the board? etc.).
Use these to guide your study i.e., emphasize studying those areas of
chess that occur in your games and where you have the least
understanding.

Note: some of the weaknesses that you discover may be more
psychological (overconfidence, lack of confidence, inability to stay
focused, etc.). These aren't usually corrected by studying chess.
Instead you may want to work with a coach to overcome these areas.



  #6   Report Post  
Old August 26th 04, 05:03 AM
sathya_me
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Mike Ogush wrote:

On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 19:37:33 +0530, sathya_me
wrote:



Dear NG,
I first apology for my cross postings to different news groups.

Since I wanted to become a serious player following are the way I
practice at home:

1)Playing one and half hour games with Deep fritz-8 by setting up the
Opening training mode
and learning the Specified line. I definitely loose but each time It
shows me to play the correct position.

2) I will solve some 20 middle game problem from Middle game encyclopedia.

3) 20 end game problems from chess cafe archives and taking 10 ending
positions
from the data base comes along with the Deep fritz-8 CD's endgame
classifications.

4) Playing a game in the solitary chess (i.e. not looking at a game's
next move or hiding the next move)

My doubt is shall continue with the above way of practice or practice
any one of the above with full time
attention. I mean to say , first solve all the middle game problems from
available sources and go for end game problems,
giving little attention to the playing game with deep fritz-8 .

Hoping to get help.
Sincerely,
N.Sathyashrayan


--

"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)




This form of study is a good start, when you don't know your strengths
and weaknesses (especially when you haven't yet created areas you are
strong in). After a while though it will be more efficient to focus
your study.

I would start playing games at a slow time control (shortest control =
game in 60 minutes) against opponents that have ratings 0 to 200
points higher than you.

At home annotate each game thoroughly to find all of the points in the
game where you played a less than best move. Be sure to look for
points where you made an inferior move, but your opponent did not find
the best reply. The best annotation of each game has three steps:
1. Do the annotation yourself (or with your opponent) preferably
right after the game has finished when you still remember what you
were thinking during the game. Write down your thoughts that
occurred during the game as best you remember them:
* What was the principal variation that you expected after each

of your moves?
* Which of your opponent's moves surprised you?
* What alternative moves did you consider and why did you
reject them?
* What evaluation (+-, +/-, +/=, =. =/+, -/+, -+) did you give
positions during the game and why?
* Who deviated first from standard opening theory? Was the
deviation any good? Why was it good or bad?
Later add alternative variations that did not occur to you during the
game, but came to you afterwards.
2. Let Fritz annotate the annotated game using blunder-check and
letting it have 1-2 minutes for each move of the side (white or black)
that you played. Fritz is very good at finding mistakes you made in
either in the game or in the annotations that are purely tactical.
For the positions that Fritz pointed better moves, play over those
positions to make sure that you both understand and agree with Fritz'
evaluation. [Sometimes chess programs incorrectly evaluate the
compensation for gambits and sacrifices.]
3. Ask someone of master strength to help annotate the game to find
places where you made positional mistakes. [You may need to hire a
master (as a coach) if you cannot find anyone willing to volunteer
their time.]

The results of all this work annotating your games will be to identify
areas that you are weakest at. Some of those areas will be related
to specific parts of chess knowledge (e.g. How to play for advantage
when you have an isolated queen pawn? When your opponent has one?
What is the best plan when up a pawn with rooks on the board? etc.).
Use these to guide your study i.e., emphasize studying those areas of
chess that occur in your games and where you have the least
understanding.

Note: some of the weaknesses that you discover may be more
psychological (overconfidence, lack of confidence, inability to stay
focused, etc.). These aren't usually corrected by studying chess.
Instead you may want to work with a coach to overcome these areas.



Thanks a lot for all the replays and I will follow the same.

--
"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)

  #7   Report Post  
Old August 27th 04, 05:08 PM
Po Ridge
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Matter of opinion but I would value the opinion of a professional coach
rather than one of the people in this newsgroup.

sathya_me wrote in message
...
Dear NG,
I first apology for my cross postings to different news groups.

Since I wanted to become a serious player following are the way I
practice at home:

1)Playing one and half hour games with Deep fritz-8 by setting up the
Opening training mode
and learning the Specified line. I definitely loose but each time It
shows me to play the correct position.

2) I will solve some 20 middle game problem from Middle game encyclopedia.

3) 20 end game problems from chess cafe archives and taking 10 ending
positions
from the data base comes along with the Deep fritz-8 CD's endgame
classifications.

4) Playing a game in the solitary chess (i.e. not looking at a game's
next move or hiding the next move)

My doubt is shall continue with the above way of practice or practice
any one of the above with full time
attention. I mean to say , first solve all the middle game problems from
available sources and go for end game problems,
giving little attention to the playing game with deep fritz-8 .

Hoping to get help.
Sincerely,
N.Sathyashrayan


--

"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)



  #8   Report Post  
Old August 27th 04, 05:11 PM
Po Ridge
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Tactics are probably more important than positional play and knowledge of
endings etc when you are at a low level of play.
i.e less than 1200 elo. You often hear it said that weaker players have fair
tactical knowledge but lack positional play.
So if you are less than 1200 elo you may find you can quickly learn
something about tactics and improve your game the most but to become a
better and more all round player you will need to look at the bigger picture
and invest effort in areas that aren't so easy to learn

Henri Arsenault wrote in message
...
In article , EZoto
wrote:


Whatever works best but the most important thing is to have fun. I
just gave some very basic stuff but no matter how strong your computer
is you still have to read a couple of books. My System from
Nimzowitcsh, Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy by Watson. These 2
books are must haves if you want to start learning chess in depth.
Then ( again my opinion ) Understanding chess move by move by Nunn.
If you want to study a tournament book then get Zurich 1953 by
Bronstein. If you want to study a player then get Fire on Board by
Shirov ( great book ). If you want to study a World Championship
Match then get Tal - Botvinnik 1960 by Mikhail Tal.

Goo recommendations, but as one who has dozens of chess books, I find it
easier to study from computers. For tactics, programs like Convekta's
CT-ART3 or some of the Chess Mentor series (both have free demos - but I
like CT-ART3 best), and for strategy, the interactive lectures with voice
comments such as Josh Waitzkin's tutorials on Chessmaster or the free
online videos on ChessFM are great.

Most books cannot have diagrams for every move, but with computers, you
can not only see every move, but call up a strong program to study
alternate lines.

But it is important to now that the study that makes the most impact is
TACTICS. There is little point in gaining an advantage from the opening if
youare unable to exploit the tactical opportunities that arise after the
opening.

Henri



  #9   Report Post  
Old November 4th 04, 07:18 AM
matt -`;'-
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"sathya_me" wrote in message ...
Dear NG,
I first apology for my cross postings to different news groups.

Since I wanted to become a serious player following are the way I
practice at home:

1)Playing one and half hour games with Deep fritz-8 by setting up the
Opening training mode
and learning the Specified line. I definitely loose but each time It
shows me to play the correct position.

2) I will solve some 20 middle game problem from Middle game encyclopedia.

3) 20 end game problems from chess cafe archives and taking 10 ending
positions
from the data base comes along with the Deep fritz-8 CD's endgame
classifications.

4) Playing a game in the solitary chess (i.e. not looking at a game's
next move or hiding the next move)

My doubt is shall continue with the above way of practice or practice
any one of the above with full time
attention. I mean to say , first solve all the middle game problems from
available sources and go for end game problems,
giving little attention to the playing game with deep fritz-8 .

Hoping to get help.
Sincerely,
N.Sathyashrayan


--

"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)


Study different areas of chess thoroughly:

Tactics: pins, revealed attacks, forks, etc.
Strategy: King attacks, point gains, distractions, slow positional gains, etc.
Openings (try to learn why each move makes sense - there are tactics even in the openings)
Piece sacrifices (to gain quicker development, to clear a way to the king)
Gambits (to gain rapid development)
Bishops and Knights (when and where one is better than the other)
Open and Closed games (pawns in the center or not)
Pieces and control of colored squares (especially by pawns and bishops)
Piece protection, defense (undefended pieces, overworked protecting pieces, blocking attacks)
Weak squares (yours, your opponents, undefended squares left when pawns move - holes)
Denying opponent development. (example: c3 and how it affects the b8 knight, a3 affects the f8 bishop)
Remove the defender: capture a piece that protects another so you can capture the now undefended piece.
Using pieces together to control squares or attack.

You can play against the computer to the point where you lose pieces or find your pieces are in bad positions causing you to face a
lost game. Then you should stop, review the game slowly move by move and make your own analysis of what it taking place and where
your mistakes are. You can then use Fritz to analyze your game and compare notes. I use Full Analysis, and 3, 1, 1, settings for
Calc time, Threshold, last move, verbose for annotations, both for side. This advises where my game is weak. The 3 second time
setting works fine on my P4-2.8ghz PC.

Try to find a few good chess books. I am reading one now called Chess Tactics and Strategy by Graham Burgess, Castle Books, and I
like it. I have found myself learning something that is somewhat elusive: combinations. They take a bit of work to see, and you
must have a good grasp of tactics to understand them. There is a lot of material covered in the book and it has become one of my
favorites.

Study GM games. Take a look at how they apply tactics, strategy and style. Take a look at the different GM's games, especially the
ones who use combinations.

Try to find someone to play chess with. I like playing on the board and find it enjoyable to play against another person because of
the unexpected moves that can occur and I get the chance to try out what I have learned.

Have fun with it all, that is part of what makes it work.


These are some ideas that I think would help, Matt



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