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Old August 23rd 04, 06:15 PM
sathya_me
 
Posts: n/a
Default Lost with Deep fritz-8 #1

Friends,
Lost this game with deep fritz-8. Please tell me why so that I can
Improve my game.

===========================cut hear for .pgn file ==========================
[Event "90'/40+1800'/20+30'"]
[Date "2004.08.23"]
[Round "?"]
[White "N.Sathyashrayan"]
[Black "Deep Fritz 8"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B74"]
[BlackElo "2601"]
[PlyCount "58"]
[TimeControl "40/5400:20/108000:1800"]

{200MB, DFritz8.ctg, D0G8C4} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6
5. Nc3
g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. Be2 Nc6 8. Nb3 O-O 9. O-O Be6 10. f4 Rc8 11. Kh1 Na5
12. Nxa5
Qxa5 13. Bd4 a6 14. Rb1 Rfe8 15. b4 Qc7 16. f5 Bc4 17. Bxc4 Qxc4 18.
fxg6 fxg6
19. Bxf6 exf6 20. Nd5 Qxe4 21. Rxf6 Rxc2 22. Qf3 Qc4 23. Rf1 Rc1 24.
Ne7+ Kh8
25. Rf7 Rxf1+ 26. Qxf1 Qxf1+ 27. Rxf1 Rxe7 28. Rd1 Re2 29. g3 Be5 0-1

--
"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)

  #2   Report Post  
Old August 24th 04, 11:10 AM
Klaus Müller
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi sathya_me,

the first thing : You cannot improve your game if you play against a
computer !!!

Next and the main is :

You played for Blacks Hand ... why ?

Please study the 4 principles : force, time, space and pawn structure.

There are many books for that themes. I prefer Seirawan's Play winning
chess. Read this and you
will find the answers for yourselve.

best wishes
Klaus

"sathya_me" wrote in message
...
Friends,
Lost this game with deep fritz-8. Please tell me why so that I can
Improve my game.

===========================cut hear for .pgn file

==========================
[Event "90'/40+1800'/20+30'"]
[Date "2004.08.23"]
[Round "?"]
[White "N.Sathyashrayan"]
[Black "Deep Fritz 8"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B74"]
[BlackElo "2601"]
[PlyCount "58"]
[TimeControl "40/5400:20/108000:1800"]

{200MB, DFritz8.ctg, D0G8C4} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6
5. Nc3
g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. Be2 Nc6 8. Nb3 O-O 9. O-O Be6 10. f4 Rc8 11. Kh1 Na5
12. Nxa5
Qxa5 13. Bd4 a6 14. Rb1 Rfe8 15. b4 Qc7 16. f5 Bc4 17. Bxc4 Qxc4 18.
fxg6 fxg6
19. Bxf6 exf6 20. Nd5 Qxe4 21. Rxf6 Rxc2 22. Qf3 Qc4 23. Rf1 Rc1 24.
Ne7+ Kh8
25. Rf7 Rxf1+ 26. Qxf1 Qxf1+ 27. Rxf1 Rxe7 28. Rd1 Re2 29. g3 Be5 0-1

--
"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)



  #3   Report Post  
Old August 27th 04, 05:34 AM
My name is Mac, not Spam
 
Posts: n/a
Default

in article , sathya_me at
wrote on 8/23/04 1:15 PM:

{200MB, DFritz8.ctg, D0G8C4} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6
5. Nc3
g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. Be2 Nc6 8. Nb3 O-O 9. O-O Be6 10. f4 Rc8 11. Kh1 Na5
12. Nxa5
Qxa5 13. Bd4 a6 14. Rb1 Rfe8 15. b4 Qc7 16. f5 Bc4 17. Bxc4 Qxc4 18.
fxg6 fxg6
19. Bxf6 exf6 20. Nd5 Qxe4 21. Rxf6 Rxc2 22. Qf3 Qc4 23. Rf1 Rc1 24.
Ne7+ Kh8
25. Rf7 Rxf1+ 26. Qxf1 Qxf1+ 27. Rxf1 Rxe7 28. Rd1 Re2 29. g3 Be5 0-1


I'm hardly the person to be giving you advise, but since the only other
reply to your reasonable query that I've seen basically (and incorrectly)
gave the message "don't bother, you're wasting your time with computers and
asking the wrong questions", I'll offer my own little bit of advice that
addresses your actual question:

You allowed your Queen to get overloaded. She's doing too many things at
once after your twenty-third move (23.Rf1?); she's written more checks than
she has money for in the bank, and when her obligations finally start coming
due (on the f-file), she becomes no-longer able to handle her duties
elsewhere (like defending the knight on the d-file). In general, the Queen's
power lies in how many different axes of ATTACK she has; it's a mistake to
believe that it can DEFEND everything it points at at once--although a very
easy mistake to fall into.

It appears to me that either, (a) you just didn't see, conceptually, that
the piece wouldn't be able to simultaneously defend all the squares it
looked like it could, (b) you saw the possibility but somewhere your
calculations slipped up, or (c) you at some point blanked on the fact that
Black had two pieces that both were going to capture--with check--in the
coming dustup, and so thought you had an in-between move or some alternative
move order available to you that in fact you turned out not to have.

Even before the sequence that cost you that extra piece, though, you were
getting yourself into trouble by leaving too many pieces unsupported. This
built up slowly, but by move seventeen you had two pieces and four pawns
that either were totally unsupported or at best were supported solely by a
piece far more valuable, every single one of them attacked directly or
indirectly by Black's Queen sitting on c4. Specifically, look to the pieces
that on move 19 sit on a2, b4, c2, c3, d4 and e4. Now go back to the
beginning and play through your game, watching for how each one of them got
where they were by move 19, and try to recall your thinking at the time.

In other words, summing it all up: I think there's something going on
psychologically with how you view enemy threats that perhaps needs tweaking.
But that's just the opinion of someone of very little rating and far more
study time logged than actual rated play.

--
Glenn "Mac" Frazier USCF# 12721233
FICS: 'Frazier'
http://mac.thefraziers.org/ RedHotPawn.com: 'GMF'



  #4   Report Post  
Old August 28th 04, 05:03 PM
sathya_me
 
Posts: n/a
Default



My name is Mac, not Spam wrote:

in article , sathya_me at
wrote on 8/23/04 1:15 PM:



{200MB, DFritz8.ctg, D0G8C4} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6
5. Nc3
g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. Be2 Nc6 8. Nb3 O-O 9. O-O Be6 10. f4 Rc8 11. Kh1 Na5
12. Nxa5
Qxa5 13. Bd4 a6 14. Rb1 Rfe8 15. b4 Qc7 16. f5 Bc4 17. Bxc4 Qxc4 18.
fxg6 fxg6
19. Bxf6 exf6 20. Nd5 Qxe4 21. Rxf6 Rxc2 22. Qf3 Qc4 23. Rf1 Rc1 24.
Ne7+ Kh8
25. Rf7 Rxf1+ 26. Qxf1 Qxf1+ 27. Rxf1 Rxe7 28. Rd1 Re2 29. g3 Be5 0-1



I'm hardly the person to be giving you advise, but since the only other
reply to your reasonable query that I've seen basically (and incorrectly)
gave the message "don't bother, you're wasting your time with computers and
asking the wrong questions", I'll offer my own little bit of advice that
addresses your actual question:

You allowed your Queen to get overloaded. She's doing too many things at
once after your twenty-third move (23.Rf1?); she's written more checks than
she has money for in the bank, and when her obligations finally start coming
due (on the f-file), she becomes no-longer able to handle her duties
elsewhere (like defending the knight on the d-file). In general, the Queen's
power lies in how many different axes of ATTACK she has; it's a mistake to
believe that it can DEFEND everything it points at at once--although a very
easy mistake to fall into.

During the game I did not considered (or never even thought of) the
Queen getting over loaded. I must see lot of
games with some concepts.Any web link for the concepts like the above
one ( Isolated pawn , hanging pawn,
O-O vs O-O-O , etc).Please give me the internet link if possible instead
of recommending some set of books. I am
out off money.


It appears to me that either, (a) you just didn't see, conceptually, that
the piece wouldn't be able to simultaneously defend all the squares it
looked like it could,

Yes, lack of experience

(b) you saw the possibility but somewhere your
calculations slipped up, or

Yes, lack of experience

(c) you at some point blanked on the fact that
Black had two pieces that both were going to capture--with check--in the
coming dustup, and so thought you had an in-between move or some alternative
move order available to you that in fact you turned out not to have.


After move 15. all the moves were desperate moves. 13. ... a6 was not
in the book. The c4 square was out
of scope for me.

Even before the sequence that cost you that extra piece, though, you were
getting yourself into trouble by leaving too many pieces unsupported. This
built up slowly, but by move seventeen you had two pieces and four pawns
that either were totally unsupported or at best were supported solely by a
piece far more valuable, every single one of them attacked directly or
indirectly by Black's Queen sitting on c4. Specifically, look to the pieces
that on move 19 sit on a2, b4, c2, c3, d4 and e4. Now go back to the
beginning and play through your game, watching for how each one of them got
where they were by move 19, and try to recall your thinking at the time.

The above thoughts were not occurred to me during the game.
Thanks for the useful comments.
I will have another game with the Deep fritz -8. Definitely I will post it.


In other words, summing it all up: I think there's something going on
psychologically with how you view enemy threats that perhaps needs tweaking.
But that's just the opinion of someone of very little rating and far more
study time logged than actual rated play.



Thanks,
N.Sathyashrayan

--
"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)

  #5   Report Post  
Old August 28th 04, 09:35 PM
My name is Mac, not Spam
 
Posts: n/a
Default

in article , sathya_me at
wrote on 8/28/04 12:03 PM:



My name is Mac, not Spam wrote:


You allowed your Queen to get overloaded. She's doing too many things at
once after your twenty-third move (23.Rf1?); she's written more checks than
she has money for in the bank, and when her obligations finally start coming
due (on the f-file), she becomes no-longer able to handle her duties
elsewhere (like defending the knight on the d-file). In general, the Queen's
power lies in how many different axes of ATTACK she has; it's a mistake to
believe that it can DEFEND everything it points at at once--although a very
easy mistake to fall into.

During the game I did not considered (or never even thought of) the
Queen getting over loaded. I must see lot of
games with some concepts.Any web link for the concepts like the above
one ( Isolated pawn , hanging pawn,
O-O vs O-O-O , etc).Please give me the internet link if possible instead
of recommending some set of books. I am
out off money.


I'm sorry to hear that. When you do get some money, Jeremy Silman's books
are excellent for conceptual stuff. A good starting point would be "The
Complete Book of Chess Strategy", (ISBN 1-980085-01-4) which is full of
mini-articles on all these ideas.

But for now, no books, so I'll stop mentioning books, now.

A website that I have returned to again and again, and sent others to with
quite satisfactory results, is the extensive Exeter Chess Club Coaching
site:

http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/coaching.html

For free chess instructional materials, it's hard to beat. Some of the pages
are themselves a bit "overloaded", but that's a tiny complaint. In
particular, check out the following areas:

"General Chess Handouts"
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/general.html

"Chess Strategy Handouts"
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/strategy.html

"A Course of Study"
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/programme.html

"Quotes: The play of the game"
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/quotes.html#play

I'd say may pick for 1st runner up after the Exeter sight is Dan Heisman's
site:

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/danhei...hess/chess.htm

A lot of the stuff there is more of interest to players local to the
Philadelphia area (like myself), but he's also got a lot of really useful
instructional material that'll apply in Asia and Europe just as easily as in
Pennsylvania.

In particular, he's got links and archives of numerous articles he's written
for ChessCafe.com, JeremySilman.com, and for other venues:

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/danhei.../Articles.html

I hope these two sites help. Beyond that, though, keep solving tactics
problems, keep playing games, and keep analyzing games.


--
Glenn 'Mac' Frazier
USCF#12721233, FICS:'Frazier', RedHotPawn.com:'GMF'
mailto: [ my 3-letter name ] @thefraziers.org, http://mac.thefraziers.org/





  #6   Report Post  
Old August 29th 04, 03:39 AM
sathya_me
 
Posts: n/a
Default



My name is Mac, not Spam wrote:

in article , sathya_me at
wrote on 8/28/04 12:03 PM:



My name is Mac, not Spam wrote:





You allowed your Queen to get overloaded. She's doing too many things at
once after your twenty-third move (23.Rf1?); she's written more checks than
she has money for in the bank, and when her obligations finally start coming
due (on the f-file), she becomes no-longer able to handle her duties
elsewhere (like defending the knight on the d-file). In general, the Queen's
power lies in how many different axes of ATTACK she has; it's a mistake to
believe that it can DEFEND everything it points at at once--although a very
easy mistake to fall into.



During the game I did not considered (or never even thought of) the
Queen getting over loaded. I must see lot of
games with some concepts.Any web link for the concepts like the above
one ( Isolated pawn , hanging pawn,
O-O vs O-O-O , etc).Please give me the internet link if possible instead
of recommending some set of books. I am
out off money.



I'm sorry to hear that. When you do get some money, Jeremy Silman's books
are excellent for conceptual stuff. A good starting point would be "The
Complete Book of Chess Strategy", (ISBN 1-980085-01-4) which is full of
mini-articles on all these ideas.

But for now, no books, so I'll stop mentioning books, now.

A website that I have returned to again and again, and sent others to with
quite satisfactory results, is the extensive Exeter Chess Club Coaching
site:

http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/coaching.html

For free chess instructional materials, it's hard to beat. Some of the pages
are themselves a bit "overloaded", but that's a tiny complaint. In
particular, check out the following areas:

"General Chess Handouts"
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/general.html

"Chess Strategy Handouts"
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/strategy.html

"A Course of Study"
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/programme.html

"Quotes: The play of the game"
http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/quotes.html#play

I'd say may pick for 1st runner up after the Exeter sight is Dan Heisman's
site:

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/danhei...hess/chess.htm

A lot of the stuff there is more of interest to players local to the
Philadelphia area (like myself), but he's also got a lot of really useful
instructional material that'll apply in Asia and Europe just as easily as in
Pennsylvania.

In particular, he's got links and archives of numerous articles he's written
for ChessCafe.com, JeremySilman.com, and for other venues:

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/danhei.../Articles.html

I hope these two sites help. Beyond that, though, keep solving tactics
problems, keep playing games, and keep analyzing games.




Thanks a lot for those links

--
"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)

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