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Old August 24th 04, 07:32 PM
David Pollitt
 
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Default What is the greatest come back game in chess?


.... where one player was very close to losing the game and turned it
around and won?
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Old August 24th 04, 08:56 PM
Roman M. Parparov
 
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David Pollitt wrote:

... where one player was very close to losing the game and turned it
around and won?


Depends

If you're talking about blundering away the won game, the 23rd game
of Steinitz-Tchigorin match in Havana, 1892 is the top candidate,
when Tchigorin being at -9+8=5 (to ten victories, 9:9 ties) in
a completely won position, played the miserable 32.Bb4????

If you're talking about an inspiring defense my favorite would be
Fischer-Tal, Belgrad 1959 (27th round) with miraculous defense
by Tal.
--
Roman M. Parparov - NASA EOSDIS project node at TAU technical manager.
Email: http://www.nasa.proj.ac.il/
Phone/Fax: +972-(0)3-6405205 (work), +972-(0)51-34-18-34 (home)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on
weather forecasters.
-- Jean-Paul Kauffmann
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Old August 25th 04, 12:44 AM
David Pollitt
 
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"Roman M. Parparov" ) writes:
David Pollitt wrote:

... where one player was very close to losing the game and turned it
around and won?


Depends

If you're talking about blundering away the won game, the 23rd game
of Steinitz-Tchigorin match in Havana, 1892 is the top candidate,
when Tchigorin being at -9+8=5 (to ten victories, 9:9 ties) in
a completely won position, played the miserable 32.Bb4????


I am wondering if you would post this game.

If you're talking about an inspiring defense my favorite would be
Fischer-Tal, Belgrad 1959 (27th round) with miraculous defense
by Tal.


Would you post this one too?

--
Roman M. Parparov - NASA EOSDIS project node at TAU technical manager.
Email: http://www.nasa.proj.ac.il/
Phone/Fax: +972-(0)3-6405205 (work), +972-(0)51-34-18-34 (home)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on
weather forecasters.
-- Jean-Paul Kauffmann



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Old August 25th 04, 02:44 AM
Steve Grant
 
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"David Pollitt" wrote in message
...

"Roman M. Parparov" ) writes:
David Pollitt wrote:

... where one player was very close to losing the game and turned it
around and won?


Depends

If you're talking about blundering away the won game, the 23rd game
of Steinitz-Tchigorin match in Havana, 1892 is the top candidate,
when Tchigorin being at -9+8=5 (to ten victories, 9:9 ties) in
a completely won position, played the miserable 32.Bb4????


I am wondering if you would post this game.


[Event "World Championship Match"]
[Site "Havana CUB"]
[Date "1892.??.??"]
[Round "23"]
[White "Chigorin, Mikhail I"]
[Black "Steinitz, Wilhelm"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C34"]

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e5 Nh5 5.Be2 g6 6.d4 Bg7 7.O-O d6 8.Nc3 O-O
9.Ne1 dxe5 10.Bxh5 gxh5 11.dxe5 Qxd1 12.Nxd1 Nc6 13.Bxf4 Bf5 14.Ne3 Be4
15.Nf3 Rfe8 16.Ng5 Bg6 17.Nd5 Bxe5 18.Nxc7 Bxc7 19.Bxc7 Rac8 20.Bg3 Nd4
21.c3 Ne2+ 22.Kf2 h4 23.Bd6 Nd4 24.cxd4 Rc2+ 25.Kg1 Ree2 26.Rae1 Rxg2+ 27.
Kh1 Kg7 28.Re8 f5 29.Ne6+ Kf6 30.Re7 Rge2 31.d5 Rcd2 32.Bb4 Rxh2+ 0-1


If you're talking about an inspiring defense my favorite would be
Fischer-Tal, Belgrad 1959 (27th round) with miraculous defense
by Tal.


Would you post this one too?


[Event "Belgrade / Bled / Zagreb (ct)"]
[Site "Belgrade / Bled / Zagreb, YUG"]
[Date "1959.??.??"]
[Round "27"]
[White "Fischer, Robert J"]
[Black "Tal, Mikhail"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B87"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bc4 e6 7.Bb3 b5 8.f4 b4
9.Na4 Nxe4 10.O-O g6 11.f5 gxf5 12.Nxf5 Rg8 13.Bd5 Ra7 14.Bxe4 exf5 15.
Bxf5 Re7 16.Bxc8 Qxc8 17.Bf4 Qc6 18.Qf3 Qxa4 19.Bxd6 Qc6 20.Bxb8 Qb6+ 21.
Kh1 Qxb8 22.Qc6+ Rd7 23.Rae1+ Be7 24.Rxf7 Kxf7 25.Qe6+ Kf8 26.Qxd7 Qd6 27.
Qb7 Rg6 28.c3 a5 29.Qc8+ Kg7 30.Qc4 Bd8 31.cxb4 axb4 32.g3 Qc6+ 33.Re4
Qxc4 34.Rxc4 Rb6 35.Kg2 Kf6 36.Kf3 Ke5 37.Ke3 Bg5+ 38.Ke2 Kd5 39.Kd3 Bf6
40.Rc2 Be5 41.Re2 Rf6 42.Rc2 Rf3+ 43.Ke2 Rf7 44.Kd3 Bd4 45.a3 b3 46.Rc8
Bxb2 47.Rd8+ Kc6 48.Rb8 Rf3+ 49.Kc4 Rc3+ 50.Kb4 Kc7 51.Rb5 Ba1 52.a4 b2
0-1


--
Roman M. Parparov - NASA EOSDIS project node at TAU technical manager.
Email: http://www.nasa.proj.ac.il/
Phone/Fax: +972-(0)3-6405205 (work), +972-(0)51-34-18-34 (home)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on
weather forecasters.
-- Jean-Paul Kauffmann





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Old August 25th 04, 06:48 AM
Roman M. Parparov
 
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David Pollitt wrote:

"Roman M. Parparov" ) writes:
David Pollitt wrote:

... where one player was very close to losing the game and turned it
around and won?


Depends

If you're talking about blundering away the won game, the 23rd game
of Steinitz-Tchigorin match in Havana, 1892 is the top candidate,
when Tchigorin being at -9+8=5 (to ten victories, 9:9 ties) in
a completely won position, played the miserable 32.Bb4????


I am wondering if you would post this game.


If you're talking about an inspiring defense my favorite would be
Fischer-Tal, Belgrad 1959 (27th round) with miraculous defense
by Tal.


Would you post this one too?


After a short web search:

Tchigorin-Steinitz

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e5 Nh5 5. Be2 g6 6. d4 Bg7 7. O-O d6 8. Nc3
O-O 9. Ne1 dxe5 10. Bxh5 gxh5 11. dxe5 Qxd1 12. Nxd1 Nc6 13. Bxf4 Bf5 14. Ne3
Be4 15. Nf3 Rfe8 16. Ng5 Bg6 17. Nd5 Bxe5 18. Nxc7 Bxc7 19. Bxc7 Rac8 20. Bg3
Nd4 21. c3 Ne2+ 22. Kf2 h4 23. Bd6 Nd4 24. cxd4 Rc2+ 25. Kg1 Ree2 26. Rae1
Rxg2+ 27. Kh1 Kg7 28. Re8 f5 29. Ne6+ Kf6 30. Re7 Rge2 31. d5 Rcd2 32. Bb4
Rxh2+ 0-1

Fischer-Tal

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bc4 e6 7. Bb3
b5 8. f4 b4 9. Na4 Nxe4 10. O-O g6 11. f5 gxf5 12. Nxf5 Rg8 13. Bd5
Ra7 14. Bxe4 exf5 15. Bxf5 Re7 16. Bxc8 Qxc8 17. Bf4 Qc6 18. Qf3 Qxa4
19. Bxd6 Qc6 20. Bxb8 Qb6+ 21. Kh1 Qxb8 22. Qc6+ Rd7 23. Rae1+ Be7 24.
Rxf7 Kxf7 25. Qe6+ Kf8 26. Qxd7 Qd6 27. Qb7 Rg6 28. c3 a5 29. Qc8+ Kg7
30. Qc4 Bd8 31. cxb4 axb4 32. g3 Qc6+ 33. Re4 Qxc4 34. Rxc4 Rb6 35.
Kg2 Kf6 36. Kf3 Ke5 37. Ke3 Bg5+ 38. Ke2 Kd5 39. Kd3 Bf6 40. Rc2 Be5
41. Re2 Rf6 42. Rc2 Rf3+ 43. Ke2 Rf7 44. Kd3 Bd4 45. a3 b3 46. Rc8
Bxb2 47. Rd8+ Kc6 48. Rb8 Rf3+ 49. Kc4 Rc3+ 50. Kb4 Kc7 51. Rb5 Ba1
52. a4 b2 0-1
--
Roman M. Parparov - NASA EOSDIS project node at TAU technical manager.
Email: http://www.nasa.proj.ac.il/
Phone/Fax: +972-(0)3-6405205 (work), +972-(0)51-34-18-34 (home)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on
weather forecasters.
-- Jean-Paul Kauffmann


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Old August 25th 04, 07:38 AM
David Pollitt
 
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"Roman M. Parparov" ) writes:
David Pollitt wrote:

... where one player was very close to losing the game and turned it
around and won?


Depends

If you're talking about blundering away the won game, the 23rd game
of Steinitz-Tchigorin match in Havana, 1892 is the top candidate,
when Tchigorin being at -9+8=5 (to ten victories, 9:9 ties) in
a completely won position, played the miserable 32.Bb4????

If you're talking about an inspiring defense my favorite would be
Fischer-Tal, Belgrad 1959 (27th round) with miraculous defense
by Tal.


Actually what I was interested in was a recovery from one or more (very)
bad moves that left one player in a terrible position and down in material
and then comming back to win the game. This happened not becasue his
opponent made a terrible blunder, but becasue the player made very good
moves and recovered.
The game would look something like the followeing:

1. e4 c5 2. ## ## 3. ## ## 4. ## ## 5. ## ##? 6. ## ##
7. ## ##!? 8. ## ## 9. ##! ## 10. ## ## 11. ## ##??
12. ##! ## 13. ## ##!? 14. ##! ## 15. ## ##!! 16. ## ##!!
17. ## ##! 18. ## ## 19. ## ##! 20. ## ## 22. ##! ##
23. ## ## 24. ## ## 25. ## ##!? 26. ## ##! 27. ## ## 0-1
White resignes.

--
Roman M. Parparov - NASA EOSDIS project node at TAU technical manager.
Email: http://www.nasa.proj.ac.il/
Phone/Fax: +972-(0)3-6405205 (work), +972-(0)51-34-18-34 (home)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on
weather forecasters.
-- Jean-Paul Kauffmann



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Old August 25th 04, 12:50 PM
Tim923
 
Posts: n/a
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Ah, sounds like one of my losses.

On 24 Aug 2004 18:32:37 GMT, (David Pollitt)
wrote:


... where one player was very close to losing the game and turned it
around and won?


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Old August 25th 04, 03:32 PM
Tony Warnock
 
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Default

I don't have the score handy, but Alekhine-Nimzovich 1914 (Russian
championship?) given in "The Unknown Alekhine" is a good candidate.
The book is an old Dover reprint by Reinfeld.
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Old August 26th 04, 12:20 AM
Spencer R. Lower
 
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It is not possible to be down material in a terrible position, then win the
game without a blunder by the opponent.

What you are suggesting would really look like this:
1. e4 c5 2. ## ## 3. ## ## 4. ## ## 5. ## ##? 6. ## ##
7. ## ##!? 8. ## ## 9. ##! ## 10. ## ## 11. ## ##??
12. ##! ## 13. ## ##!? 14. ##! ## 15. ##?! ##!! 16. ##?! ##!!
17. ##?! ##! 18. ## ## 19. ##?! ##! 20. ## ## 22. ##! ##
23. ## ## 24. ## ## 25. ## ##!? 26. ##?! ##! 27. ## ## 0-1
White resignes.

But if the position where +- after move 12, it is not possible for White to
lose without one of the dubious (?!) moves actually being a blunder (??),
or at least 2 of them being mistakes (?).



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