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Old March 27th 04, 10:31 PM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sam's Comeback Fails

Sam's Comeback Fails

I played in an action tournament at the Marshall Chess Club Thursday
night, hoping to make my big comeback. (Actually, I am running for
election, but do not tell anybody yet.)

Anyway, I played three interesting games. I managed to sacrifice
something each game. Too bad I lost two of them. I would like somebody
to check these games with Fritz, because I think my sacrifices were
likely sound.

My first game was against a master-expert. At the end I had actually
equalized, or nearly so, even though my sacrifice of a rook had not
worked out as well as I had hoped. However, I had taken too much time.
I did not write down the last dozen moves but anyway my flag fell.

My second game was going to be published in every anthology of short
games in the world, because I had four different ways to catch my
opponent in a smothered mate on move ten. Something of a record.
However, my cowardly opponent did not play into the smothered mate. I
do not think he saw it. I just think he was lucky. I beat him anyway,
but it took me 35 moves to do it.

My third game was upsetting. I had my opponent beat easily. I nearly
caught in a trap I invented while I was in prison in 1978 in
Jalalabad, Afghanistan as a political prisoner. I had a pocket chess
set with me while in prison, so naturally I worked on my openings.
This and my "Jalalabad Defense" (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 c5) are my two major
discoveries from this time. Unfortunately, in the intervening 26
years, only one person has fallen into my trap (and I am not going to
tell you what it is, by the way).

I showed up late for the tournament. I was planning to be on time but
to my surprise a famous big-time international chess master (and small
time movie star) by the name of Mr. Z called me for the first time in
nearly a decade. We spoke for two hours from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM, and
so I did not make it to the Marshall until 8:00 and had to take a half
point bye.

I started off with a solid opening line as usual and I believe that I
had an early advantage. By move 19 he threatened to win my rook with
20. ... Bxf3. Rather than defend my rook, I decided to sacrifice it
for what I hoped would be a mating attack. I was surprised when he
played 21. ?c hxg6, which enabled me to threaten mate. I expected 21.
.... fxg6 22. Qxd5+ Rf7 23. Ng5 This position is unclear and this is
one of the positions I would like for somebody to check with Fritz.

After that, I sacrificed a knight, putting me a full rook down.
However, I was winning back a pawn plus the exchange and I had an
attack. Looked good.

His 25. ... f3 is a good move which threatens to win my queen with
Bf4+ . My first plan was to play 26. Bxf7+ Kxf7 27. Qxd5+ Kf8 28.
Qxf3+ Kg8 29. Qd5+ Kh7 30. Re6 Re8.

Now, the problem is that he threatens to win my queen with Bf4+. This
is easily avoided with 31. Kb1, but this gives him "sente", to use a
Japanese term from Go. Therefore, I decided to play 26. Kb1 right away
leaving the pieces and thereby the tension on the board.

I think this was a mistake and I should have played my original move,
26. Bxf7+. Probably, with that move, I have a win with best play.

My actual move, 26. Kb1, put me on the defensive. Still, in the final
position I was not completely lost. However, I had no time and my flag
fell after a few more moves.


[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "02"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Polyakin, Vladimir"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "2164"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 c6 3.h3 e5 4.e4 dxe4 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.g5 Nfd7 7.Nxe4 Nc5
8.d3 Nba6 9.a3 Nxe4 10.Bxe4 Nc5 11.Bg2 Be7 12.Qh5 Ne6 13.Nf3 Nf4
14.Bxf4 exf4 15.O-O-O O-O 16.Rhe1 Be6 17.Re4 Bd6 18.Rde1 Bd5
19.Rd4 Qb6 20.Rxd5 cxd5 21.g6 hxg6 22.Qh4 f6 23.Ng5 fxg5 24.Bxd5+
Rf7 25.Qxg5 f3 26.Kb1 Bxa3 27.Bxf7+ Kxf7 28.Qd5+ Kf8 29.Qxf3+ Kg8
30.Qd5+ Kh7 31.b3 Qf6 32.d4 Rd8 33.Qa5 Qd6 34.Qxa7 Rd7 35.Re4 g5
36.Qa4 Bb4 37.Kb2 {Zeit} 0-1

Next game. I worked out a brilliant win on move 8. Here is what could
have happened:

1.d4 e5 2.dxe5 Nc6 3.Nf3 Qe7 4.e4 Nxe5 5.Be2 Nf6 6.O-O Nxe4 7.Qd5
Ng4 8. 8.Nfd2 Nexf2

Here, I expected him to play 9. Re1, threatening to win my queen with
Bxg5. Then, I planned to play 9. ... Qe3!! This could be followed by
10. Nf3 Nh3+ (double check!!) 11. Kh1 N4f2++ or 11. Kf1 Qf2++ mate
either way. There are many variations here. All of them end with
double check followed by mate.

My cowardly opponent instead just took my knight. I still won the
game, but it took a long time.

Later, he had some interesting mate threats. Starting around move 25,
I cannot take his pawn on g4 because I will be mated with his two
knights plus his rook. I probably took an unnecessary risk by bringing
my king to the center of the board, but I often do that. I got that
habit from shogi.

In the final rook and pawn ending I was a pawn up. I know how to win
these without difficulty. Fortunately, he was out of time and allowed
me to trap his rook.

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "03"]
[White "Barkman, Peter J."]
[Black "Sloan, Sam"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A40"]
[WhiteElo "1934"]
[BlackElo "1940"]

1.d4 e5 2.dxe5 Nc6 3.Nf3 Qe7 4.e4 Nxe5 5.Be2 Nf6 6.O-O Nxe4 7.Qd5
Ng4 8.Nfd2 Nexf2 9.Rxf2 Nxf2 10.Kxf2 Qh4+ 11.Kf1 Qxh2 12.Qe4+ Be7
13.Nc3 c6 14.Nf3 Qh1+ 15.Kf2 d5 16.Qxe7+ Kxe7 17.Bg5+ f6 18.Bxf6+
gxf6 19.Rxh1 Bf5 20.Nd4 Bg6 21.g4 Kd6 22.Nf5+ Ke5 23.Bd3 Kf4
24.Ne2+ Kg5 25.Ned4 Rae8 26.Ng7 Bxd3 27.Nxe8 Be4 28.Nf3+ Bxf3
29.Kxf3 Rxe8 30.Rxh7 Rb8 31.Rg7+ Kh6 32.Re7 Kg6 33.Rd7 a5 34.Rd6
Kf7 35.Kf4 Ke7 0-1

This last game was discouraging because I was winning easily, but did
not see the end to a combination which I could have easily avoided.

The trap I found when I was in prison in Jalalabad, Afghanistan goes
1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 e5 3.c4 c6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3 Ne7 6.Nc3 Nbc6 7.Nxd5 Be6
8. Qxb7 Bxd5 9. Bxd5 and White has won a pawn.

If you do not understand why this works, just play this against me at
the next tournament and I will show you!

His 13. ... h5 was a bad move, I think. He should just castle. Another
bad move was 15. ... Rg5. This gave me two ways to win the exchange. I
could simply play 16. Ne4 Rg2 17. Nd6+ Kf8 18. Nc8. However, I felt
that my king could be in danger, so I played 16. h4, which also wins
the exchange. His rook cannot escape from the knight forks which pick
up the exchange. Finally, he just gave me the exchange directly with
16. ... Rxg3. Now, I had an easy win. Unfortunately, I miscalculated.
I decided to take his rook, bishop and knight for my queen with 22.
Qxd4. This would have left me a rook up, except that I overlooked a
check at the end of the combination which enabled him to get his rook
back. So, I was lost, although I could have defended better. Again, I
was out of time. Instead I could have played simply 22. Qg5 or Qh5 and
an exchange of queens would soon follow. With my material advantage of
an exchange plus a pawn up, I would have won easily.

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, New York"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "04"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Fischler, Matthew"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "1907"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 e5 3.c4 c6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3 Ne7 6.Nc3 Nbc6 7.Nxd5
Nd4 8.Qc4 Nec6 9.e3 Ne6 10.Ne2 Bd6 11.a3 Bd7 12.b4 Rc8 13.Qa2 h5
14.gxh5 Rxh5 15.Ng3 Rg5 16.h4 Rxg3 17.fxg3 e4 18.Nf4 Nxf4 19.exf4
Nd4 20.O-O Rc2 21.Qd5 Bc6 22.Qxd4 Bc5 23.Qxc5 Rxc5 24.bxc5 Qd4+
25.Kh2 Qxa1 26.Re1 f5 27.d3 Qc3 28.Rd1 Qc2 29.Re1 Kf7 30.Kh3 Qxd3
31.Bf1 Qc3 32.Rd1 Qc2 33.Re1 Qf2 34.Rd1 Qg1 35.g4 fxg4# 0-1

So, at the end, I lost a few more rating points. I am still hoping
someday to get back my 2104 rating I had at the end of 1998.

Sam Sloan

http://www.64.com/uscf/ratings/11115292

Take a look at the chess books at
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...d=xxcomic sxx

  #2   Report Post  
Old March 28th 04, 06:41 AM
Arod Obop
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sam's Comeback Fails

egads! Sam Sloan is weak as a player and a human being (after viewing
your website). He plays 'hope' chess ---hoping your opponent falls
into his obvious 'traps/plans.

Sloan's starting and the spreading of flasehoods is sickening and
dispicable..

He will never, ever get a vote for a position on the uscf board from
me or anyone I know.

As much as one may dislike the way John Fernandez portrays himself
during the NYMasters on ICC (with his juvenile behavior/comments), one
has to appreciate the fact that JFern sees through and is against the
absurd behaviot of Sam Sloan. I'd vote for Fernandez before Sloan.
yikes





(Sam Sloan) wrote in message ...
Sam's Comeback Fails

I played in an action tournament at the Marshall Chess Club Thursday
night, hoping to make my big comeback. (Actually, I am running for
election, but do not tell anybody yet.)

Anyway, I played three interesting games. I managed to sacrifice
something each game. Too bad I lost two of them. I would like somebody
to check these games with Fritz, because I think my sacrifices were
likely sound.

My first game was against a master-expert. At the end I had actually
equalized, or nearly so, even though my sacrifice of a rook had not
worked out as well as I had hoped. However, I had taken too much time.
I did not write down the last dozen moves but anyway my flag fell.

My second game was going to be published in every anthology of short
games in the world, because I had four different ways to catch my
opponent in a smothered mate on move ten. Something of a record.
However, my cowardly opponent did not play into the smothered mate. I
do not think he saw it. I just think he was lucky. I beat him anyway,
but it took me 35 moves to do it.

My third game was upsetting. I had my opponent beat easily. I nearly
caught in a trap I invented while I was in prison in 1978 in
Jalalabad, Afghanistan as a political prisoner. I had a pocket chess
set with me while in prison, so naturally I worked on my openings.
This and my "Jalalabad Defense" (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 c5) are my two major
discoveries from this time. Unfortunately, in the intervening 26
years, only one person has fallen into my trap (and I am not going to
tell you what it is, by the way).

I showed up late for the tournament. I was planning to be on time but
to my surprise a famous big-time international chess master (and small
time movie star) by the name of Mr. Z called me for the first time in
nearly a decade. We spoke for two hours from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM, and
so I did not make it to the Marshall until 8:00 and had to take a half
point bye.

I started off with a solid opening line as usual and I believe that I
had an early advantage. By move 19 he threatened to win my rook with
20. ... Bxf3. Rather than defend my rook, I decided to sacrifice it
for what I hoped would be a mating attack. I was surprised when he
played 21. ?c hxg6, which enabled me to threaten mate. I expected 21.
... fxg6 22. Qxd5+ Rf7 23. Ng5 This position is unclear and this is
one of the positions I would like for somebody to check with Fritz.

After that, I sacrificed a knight, putting me a full rook down.
However, I was winning back a pawn plus the exchange and I had an
attack. Looked good.

His 25. ... f3 is a good move which threatens to win my queen with
Bf4+ . My first plan was to play 26. Bxf7+ Kxf7 27. Qxd5+ Kf8 28.
Qxf3+ Kg8 29. Qd5+ Kh7 30. Re6 Re8.

Now, the problem is that he threatens to win my queen with Bf4+. This
is easily avoided with 31. Kb1, but this gives him "sente", to use a
Japanese term from Go. Therefore, I decided to play 26. Kb1 right away
leaving the pieces and thereby the tension on the board.

I think this was a mistake and I should have played my original move,
26. Bxf7+. Probably, with that move, I have a win with best play.

My actual move, 26. Kb1, put me on the defensive. Still, in the final
position I was not completely lost. However, I had no time and my flag
fell after a few more moves.


[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "02"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Polyakin, Vladimir"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "2164"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 c6 3.h3 e5 4.e4 dxe4 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.g5 Nfd7 7.Nxe4 Nc5
8.d3 Nba6 9.a3 Nxe4 10.Bxe4 Nc5 11.Bg2 Be7 12.Qh5 Ne6 13.Nf3 Nf4
14.Bxf4 exf4 15.O-O-O O-O 16.Rhe1 Be6 17.Re4 Bd6 18.Rde1 Bd5
19.Rd4 Qb6 20.Rxd5 cxd5 21.g6 hxg6 22.Qh4 f6 23.Ng5 fxg5 24.Bxd5+
Rf7 25.Qxg5 f3 26.Kb1 Bxa3 27.Bxf7+ Kxf7 28.Qd5+ Kf8 29.Qxf3+ Kg8
30.Qd5+ Kh7 31.b3 Qf6 32.d4 Rd8 33.Qa5 Qd6 34.Qxa7 Rd7 35.Re4 g5
36.Qa4 Bb4 37.Kb2 {Zeit} 0-1

Next game. I worked out a brilliant win on move 8. Here is what could
have happened:

1.d4 e5 2.dxe5 Nc6 3.Nf3 Qe7 4.e4 Nxe5 5.Be2 Nf6 6.O-O Nxe4 7.Qd5
Ng4 8. 8.Nfd2 Nexf2

Here, I expected him to play 9. Re1, threatening to win my queen with
Bxg5. Then, I planned to play 9. ... Qe3!! This could be followed by
10. Nf3 Nh3+ (double check!!) 11. Kh1 N4f2++ or 11. Kf1 Qf2++ mate
either way. There are many variations here. All of them end with
double check followed by mate.

My cowardly opponent instead just took my knight. I still won the
game, but it took a long time.

Later, he had some interesting mate threats. Starting around move 25,
I cannot take his pawn on g4 because I will be mated with his two
knights plus his rook. I probably took an unnecessary risk by bringing
my king to the center of the board, but I often do that. I got that
habit from shogi.

In the final rook and pawn ending I was a pawn up. I know how to win
these without difficulty. Fortunately, he was out of time and allowed
me to trap his rook.

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "03"]
[White "Barkman, Peter J."]
[Black "Sloan, Sam"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A40"]
[WhiteElo "1934"]
[BlackElo "1940"]

1.d4 e5 2.dxe5 Nc6 3.Nf3 Qe7 4.e4 Nxe5 5.Be2 Nf6 6.O-O Nxe4 7.Qd5
Ng4 8.Nfd2 Nexf2 9.Rxf2 Nxf2 10.Kxf2 Qh4+ 11.Kf1 Qxh2 12.Qe4+ Be7
13.Nc3 c6 14.Nf3 Qh1+ 15.Kf2 d5 16.Qxe7+ Kxe7 17.Bg5+ f6 18.Bxf6+
gxf6 19.Rxh1 Bf5 20.Nd4 Bg6 21.g4 Kd6 22.Nf5+ Ke5 23.Bd3 Kf4
24.Ne2+ Kg5 25.Ned4 Rae8 26.Ng7 Bxd3 27.Nxe8 Be4 28.Nf3+ Bxf3
29.Kxf3 Rxe8 30.Rxh7 Rb8 31.Rg7+ Kh6 32.Re7 Kg6 33.Rd7 a5 34.Rd6
Kf7 35.Kf4 Ke7 0-1

This last game was discouraging because I was winning easily, but did
not see the end to a combination which I could have easily avoided.

The trap I found when I was in prison in Jalalabad, Afghanistan goes
1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 e5 3.c4 c6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3 Ne7 6.Nc3 Nbc6 7.Nxd5 Be6
8. Qxb7 Bxd5 9. Bxd5 and White has won a pawn.

If you do not understand why this works, just play this against me at
the next tournament and I will show you!

His 13. ... h5 was a bad move, I think. He should just castle. Another
bad move was 15. ... Rg5. This gave me two ways to win the exchange. I
could simply play 16. Ne4 Rg2 17. Nd6+ Kf8 18. Nc8. However, I felt
that my king could be in danger, so I played 16. h4, which also wins
the exchange. His rook cannot escape from the knight forks which pick
up the exchange. Finally, he just gave me the exchange directly with
16. ... Rxg3. Now, I had an easy win. Unfortunately, I miscalculated.
I decided to take his rook, bishop and knight for my queen with 22.
Qxd4. This would have left me a rook up, except that I overlooked a
check at the end of the combination which enabled him to get his rook
back. So, I was lost, although I could have defended better. Again, I
was out of time. Instead I could have played simply 22. Qg5 or Qh5 and
an exchange of queens would soon follow. With my material advantage of
an exchange plus a pawn up, I would have won easily.

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, New York"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "04"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Fischler, Matthew"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "1907"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 e5 3.c4 c6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3 Ne7 6.Nc3 Nbc6 7.Nxd5
Nd4 8.Qc4 Nec6 9.e3 Ne6 10.Ne2 Bd6 11.a3 Bd7 12.b4 Rc8 13.Qa2 h5
14.gxh5 Rxh5 15.Ng3 Rg5 16.h4 Rxg3 17.fxg3 e4 18.Nf4 Nxf4 19.exf4
Nd4 20.O-O Rc2 21.Qd5 Bc6 22.Qxd4 Bc5 23.Qxc5 Rxc5 24.bxc5 Qd4+
25.Kh2 Qxa1 26.Re1 f5 27.d3 Qc3 28.Rd1 Qc2 29.Re1 Kf7 30.Kh3 Qxd3
31.Bf1 Qc3 32.Rd1 Qc2 33.Re1 Qf2 34.Rd1 Qg1 35.g4 fxg4# 0-1

So, at the end, I lost a few more rating points. I am still hoping
someday to get back my 2104 rating I had at the end of 1998.

Sam Sloan

http://www.64.com/uscf/ratings/11115292

Take a look at the chess books at
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...d=xxcomic sxx

  #3   Report Post  
Old March 28th 04, 12:58 PM
Jürgen R.
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sam's Comeback Fails

On Sat, 27 Mar 2004 22:31:17 GMT, (Sam Sloan)
wrote:

There are psychological conditions characterized by loss of the
critical faculties, often by complete lack of self-criticism: Whatever
occurs to me must be interesting, simply by virtue of having appeared
in my mind; thus there is no need to ask whether such an apparition is
true or false, sound or unsound, real or imaginary.

How can anybody make nonsense like these 3 games public without
feeling any embarrassment?

Sloan, are you sure that it is necessary for you to play chess? Can't
you find an activity more suited to your addled brain and your
worn-out member?

Jürgen

Sam's Comeback Fails

I played in an action tournament at the Marshall Chess Club Thursday
night, hoping to make my big comeback. (Actually, I am running for
election, but do not tell anybody yet.)

Anyway, I played three interesting games. I managed to sacrifice
something each game. Too bad I lost two of them. I would like somebody
to check these games with Fritz, because I think my sacrifices were
likely sound.

My first game was against a master-expert. At the end I had actually
equalized, or nearly so, even though my sacrifice of a rook had not
worked out as well as I had hoped. However, I had taken too much time.
I did not write down the last dozen moves but anyway my flag fell.

My second game was going to be published in every anthology of short
games in the world, because I had four different ways to catch my
opponent in a smothered mate on move ten. Something of a record.
However, my cowardly opponent did not play into the smothered mate. I
do not think he saw it. I just think he was lucky. I beat him anyway,
but it took me 35 moves to do it.

My third game was upsetting. I had my opponent beat easily. I nearly
caught in a trap I invented while I was in prison in 1978 in
Jalalabad, Afghanistan as a political prisoner. I had a pocket chess
set with me while in prison, so naturally I worked on my openings.
This and my "Jalalabad Defense" (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 c5) are my two major
discoveries from this time. Unfortunately, in the intervening 26
years, only one person has fallen into my trap (and I am not going to
tell you what it is, by the way).

I showed up late for the tournament. I was planning to be on time but
to my surprise a famous big-time international chess master (and small
time movie star) by the name of Mr. Z called me for the first time in
nearly a decade. We spoke for two hours from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM, and
so I did not make it to the Marshall until 8:00 and had to take a half
point bye.

I started off with a solid opening line as usual and I believe that I
had an early advantage. By move 19 he threatened to win my rook with
20. ... Bxf3. Rather than defend my rook, I decided to sacrifice it
for what I hoped would be a mating attack. I was surprised when he
played 21. ?c hxg6, which enabled me to threaten mate. I expected 21.
... fxg6 22. Qxd5+ Rf7 23. Ng5 This position is unclear and this is
one of the positions I would like for somebody to check with Fritz.

After that, I sacrificed a knight, putting me a full rook down.
However, I was winning back a pawn plus the exchange and I had an
attack. Looked good.

His 25. ... f3 is a good move which threatens to win my queen with
Bf4+ . My first plan was to play 26. Bxf7+ Kxf7 27. Qxd5+ Kf8 28.
Qxf3+ Kg8 29. Qd5+ Kh7 30. Re6 Re8.

Now, the problem is that he threatens to win my queen with Bf4+. This
is easily avoided with 31. Kb1, but this gives him "sente", to use a
Japanese term from Go. Therefore, I decided to play 26. Kb1 right away
leaving the pieces and thereby the tension on the board.

I think this was a mistake and I should have played my original move,
26. Bxf7+. Probably, with that move, I have a win with best play.

My actual move, 26. Kb1, put me on the defensive. Still, in the final
position I was not completely lost. However, I had no time and my flag
fell after a few more moves.


[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "02"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Polyakin, Vladimir"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "2164"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 c6 3.h3 e5 4.e4 dxe4 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.g5 Nfd7 7.Nxe4 Nc5
8.d3 Nba6 9.a3 Nxe4 10.Bxe4 Nc5 11.Bg2 Be7 12.Qh5 Ne6 13.Nf3 Nf4
14.Bxf4 exf4 15.O-O-O O-O 16.Rhe1 Be6 17.Re4 Bd6 18.Rde1 Bd5
19.Rd4 Qb6 20.Rxd5 cxd5 21.g6 hxg6 22.Qh4 f6 23.Ng5 fxg5 24.Bxd5+
Rf7 25.Qxg5 f3 26.Kb1 Bxa3 27.Bxf7+ Kxf7 28.Qd5+ Kf8 29.Qxf3+ Kg8
30.Qd5+ Kh7 31.b3 Qf6 32.d4 Rd8 33.Qa5 Qd6 34.Qxa7 Rd7 35.Re4 g5
36.Qa4 Bb4 37.Kb2 {Zeit} 0-1

Next game. I worked out a brilliant win on move 8. Here is what could
have happened:

1.d4 e5 2.dxe5 Nc6 3.Nf3 Qe7 4.e4 Nxe5 5.Be2 Nf6 6.O-O Nxe4 7.Qd5
Ng4 8. 8.Nfd2 Nexf2

Here, I expected him to play 9. Re1, threatening to win my queen with
Bxg5. Then, I planned to play 9. ... Qe3!! This could be followed by
10. Nf3 Nh3+ (double check!!) 11. Kh1 N4f2++ or 11. Kf1 Qf2++ mate
either way. There are many variations here. All of them end with
double check followed by mate.

My cowardly opponent instead just took my knight. I still won the
game, but it took a long time.

Later, he had some interesting mate threats. Starting around move 25,
I cannot take his pawn on g4 because I will be mated with his two
knights plus his rook. I probably took an unnecessary risk by bringing
my king to the center of the board, but I often do that. I got that
habit from shogi.

In the final rook and pawn ending I was a pawn up. I know how to win
these without difficulty. Fortunately, he was out of time and allowed
me to trap his rook.

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "03"]
[White "Barkman, Peter J."]
[Black "Sloan, Sam"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A40"]
[WhiteElo "1934"]
[BlackElo "1940"]

1.d4 e5 2.dxe5 Nc6 3.Nf3 Qe7 4.e4 Nxe5 5.Be2 Nf6 6.O-O Nxe4 7.Qd5
Ng4 8.Nfd2 Nexf2 9.Rxf2 Nxf2 10.Kxf2 Qh4+ 11.Kf1 Qxh2 12.Qe4+ Be7
13.Nc3 c6 14.Nf3 Qh1+ 15.Kf2 d5 16.Qxe7+ Kxe7 17.Bg5+ f6 18.Bxf6+
gxf6 19.Rxh1 Bf5 20.Nd4 Bg6 21.g4 Kd6 22.Nf5+ Ke5 23.Bd3 Kf4
24.Ne2+ Kg5 25.Ned4 Rae8 26.Ng7 Bxd3 27.Nxe8 Be4 28.Nf3+ Bxf3
29.Kxf3 Rxe8 30.Rxh7 Rb8 31.Rg7+ Kh6 32.Re7 Kg6 33.Rd7 a5 34.Rd6
Kf7 35.Kf4 Ke7 0-1

This last game was discouraging because I was winning easily, but did
not see the end to a combination which I could have easily avoided.

The trap I found when I was in prison in Jalalabad, Afghanistan goes
1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 e5 3.c4 c6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3 Ne7 6.Nc3 Nbc6 7.Nxd5 Be6
8. Qxb7 Bxd5 9. Bxd5 and White has won a pawn.

If you do not understand why this works, just play this against me at
the next tournament and I will show you!

His 13. ... h5 was a bad move, I think. He should just castle. Another
bad move was 15. ... Rg5. This gave me two ways to win the exchange. I
could simply play 16. Ne4 Rg2 17. Nd6+ Kf8 18. Nc8. However, I felt
that my king could be in danger, so I played 16. h4, which also wins
the exchange. His rook cannot escape from the knight forks which pick
up the exchange. Finally, he just gave me the exchange directly with
16. ... Rxg3. Now, I had an easy win. Unfortunately, I miscalculated.
I decided to take his rook, bishop and knight for my queen with 22.
Qxd4. This would have left me a rook up, except that I overlooked a
check at the end of the combination which enabled him to get his rook
back. So, I was lost, although I could have defended better. Again, I
was out of time. Instead I could have played simply 22. Qg5 or Qh5 and
an exchange of queens would soon follow. With my material advantage of
an exchange plus a pawn up, I would have won easily.

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, New York"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "04"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Fischler, Matthew"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "1907"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 e5 3.c4 c6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3 Ne7 6.Nc3 Nbc6 7.Nxd5
Nd4 8.Qc4 Nec6 9.e3 Ne6 10.Ne2 Bd6 11.a3 Bd7 12.b4 Rc8 13.Qa2 h5
14.gxh5 Rxh5 15.Ng3 Rg5 16.h4 Rxg3 17.fxg3 e4 18.Nf4 Nxf4 19.exf4
Nd4 20.O-O Rc2 21.Qd5 Bc6 22.Qxd4 Bc5 23.Qxc5 Rxc5 24.bxc5 Qd4+
25.Kh2 Qxa1 26.Re1 f5 27.d3 Qc3 28.Rd1 Qc2 29.Re1 Kf7 30.Kh3 Qxd3
31.Bf1 Qc3 32.Rd1 Qc2 33.Re1 Qf2 34.Rd1 Qg1 35.g4 fxg4# 0-1

So, at the end, I lost a few more rating points. I am still hoping
someday to get back my 2104 rating I had at the end of 1998.

Sam Sloan

http://www.64.com/uscf/ratings/11115292

Take a look at the chess books at
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...d=xxcomic sxx


  #4   Report Post  
Old March 28th 04, 04:37 PM
David Richerby
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sam's Comeback Fails

Sam Sloan wrote:
I managed to sacrifice something each game. Too bad I lost two of
them. I would like somebody to check these games with Fritz, because
I think my sacrifices were likely sound.


Fritz doesn't like the exchange sac in the first game and doesn't think
much of the knight sac, either. It's happy with your exchange of two
knights for rook and two pawns in the second game but judges the position
to be equal after your opponent won back the pawn and got the queens off.
As you, yourself, said, the exchange fest in the third game is unsound
because of 24... Qd4+. Fritz's commentary is at the end of the post.


My third game was upsetting. I had my opponent beat easily. I nearly
caught in a trap I invented while I was in prison in 1978 in
Jalalabad, Afghanistan as a political prisoner. I had a pocket chess
set with me while in prison, so naturally I worked on my openings.
This and my "Jalalabad Defense" (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 c5) are my two major
discoveries from this time. Unfortunately, in the intervening 26
years, only one person has fallen into my trap (and I am not going to
tell you what it is, by the way).


Fritz isn't at all impressed with the `Jalalabad trap', suggesting


I started off with a solid opening line as usual and I believe that I
had an early advantage.


The Grob is solid these days? Fritz gives you +/= after 14.Bxf4 but =/+
if your opponent had played 13... g6 14.Qh6 Bf8.


By move 19 he threatened to win my rook with 20. ... Bxf3. Rather than
defend my rook, I decided to sacrifice it for what I hoped would be a
mating attack.


Fritz evaluates -+ at this point.


I was surprised when he played 21... hxg6, which enabled me to threaten
mate. I expected 21... fxg6 22. Qxd5+ Rf7 23. Ng5 This position is
unclear and this is one of the positions I would like for somebody to
check with Fritz.


You've overlooked 22... Kh8, after which Fritz puts you about a pawn up.
22... Rf7 is losing as, after 23.Ng5, Black drops a whole rook after
either 23... Qc7 24.Nxf7 Qxf7 25.Qxe6 or 23... Rf8 24.Nxf7 Rxf7 25.Re6.
I'm surprised you didn't spot that.

Fritz's commentary on the games is as follows. The NAGs a

$11: =
$14: +/=
$15: =/+
$16: +/-
$17: -/+
$18: +-
$19: -+
$142: Better is

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Polyakin, Vladimir"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "2164"]
[Annotator "Fritz 8 (10s)"]
[PlyCount "73"]
[EventDate "2004.??.??"]

{A00: Irregular Openings}
1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 c6 3. h3 e5 4. e4 {last book move} 4... dxe4 5. Nc3
Nf6 6. g5 Nfd7 7. Nxe4 Nc5 8. d3 {Consolidates e4} 8... Nba6 9. a3
{Secures b4} 9... Nxe4 10. Bxe4 Nc5 11. Bg2 Be7 12. Qh5 Ne6 {The
pressure on g5 grows} 13. Nf3 Nf4
(13... g6!? {is worth looking at} 14. Qh6 Bf8 $15)
14. Bxf4 $14 exf4 15. O-O-O O-O 16. Rhe1 Be6 17. Re4 Bd6 18. Rde1 Bd5
19. Rd4?
(19. R4e2 $142 $11 {would keep White alive})
19... Qb6 $19 20. Rxd5 cxd5 21. g6 hxg6 22. Qh4?
(22. Qxd5 Rad8 23. Qd4 Qxd4 24. Nxd4 Bc5 $19)
22... f6??
{with this move Black loses his initiative}
(22... Rfe8 $142 {makes sure everything is clear} 23. d4 Qa5 $19)
23. Ng5 $17 {Clearance to allow g2-d5} 23... fxg5 24. Bxd5+ Rf7
25. Qxg5 f3
(25... Qd4 26. Re6 Bf8 27. Re4 $17)
26. Kb1
(26. Bxf7+ Kxf7 27. Qd5+ Kf8 28. Qxf3+ Kg8 29. Qd5+ Kh7 $15)
26... Bxa3
(26... Raf8!? $142 27. Qxg6 Qa5 (27... Qxf2?? {A poison
bait which should not be taken} 28. Re8 Qg1+ 29. Qxg1 Rxe8 30. Qg6 $18)
28. Bxf7+ Rxf7 29. Re8+ Bf8 $17)
27. Bxf7+ $11 Kxf7 28. Qd5+??
{letting the wind out of his own sails}
(28. Qf4+ $142 {this is the best bet to save the position} Kg8
29. Qc4+ Kf8 30. Qf4+ Kg8 31. Qc4+ Kh7 32. Qh4+ Kg8 33. Qc4+ $11)
28... Kf8 $19 29. Qxf3+ Kg8 30. Qd5+ Kh7 31. b3 Qf6
(31... Rd8 {seems even better} 32. Qg5 Qd4 33. Qe5 Qxf2 34. Re2 $19)
32. d4
(32. Re5 Re8 33. d4 Rxe5 34. Qxe5 Qxf2 $19)
32... Rd8 33. Qa5 Qd6
(33... Qxf2 {keeps an even firmer grip} 34. Rd1 Rc8 35. Qd2 Qxd2
36. Rxd2 $19)
34. Qxa7 (34. Re4 $142 $19) 34... Rd7??
{a transit from better to worse}
(34... Bb4!? $142 {and Black can already relax} 35. Rd1 Bc3 $19)
35. Re4
(35. Re8 Rf7 36. Qa8 g5 37. Rh8+ Kg6 $17)
35... g5
(35... b5 36. Qa5 b4 37. Rh4+ Kg8 38. Qb5 $17)
36. Qa4
(36. Qa5 Qg6 37. Re2 Bf8 $17)
36... Bb4 37. Kb2 {Zeit}
(37. Qb5!? $142 $17)
0-1


[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Barkman, Peter J"]
[Black "Sloan, Sam"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A40"]
[WhiteElo "1934"]
[BlackElo "1940"]
[Annotator "Fritz 8 (10s)"]
[PlyCount "70"]
[EventDate "2004.??.??"]

{A40: Unusual replies to 1 d4}
1. d4 e5 2. dxe5 Nc6 3. Nf3 Qe7 {last book move} 4. e4 Nxe5 5. Be2
(5. Nc3 Nf6 $14) 5... Nf6 6. O-O Nxe4 7. Qd5 Ng4 8. Nfd2
(8. Qd4!? $142 $11 {might be a viable alternative})
8... Nexf2 9. Rxf2 Nxf2 10. Kxf2 Qh4+ 11. Kf1 Qxh2 12. Qe4+ Be7 13. Nc3 c6
{Controls b5} 14. Nf3 Qh1+ 15. Kf2 d5 16. Qxe7+ {Eliminates the
defender e7} 16... Kxe7 {Decoy to e7} 17. Bg5+ {Discovered attack}
17... f6 18. Bxf6+ {Demolishes the pawn shield} 18... gxf6 (18... Kxf6
19. Rxh1) 19. Rxh1 $11 Bf5 20. Nd4 Bg6 21. g4 Kd6 22. Nf5+ {The knight
dominates} (22. Bd3 Rae8 $11) 22... Ke5
(22... Bxf5!? 23. gxf5 Ke5 $15)
23. Bd3 $11 Kf4 24. Ne2+ Kg5
(24... Ke5!? $14 {is worthy of consideration})
25. Ned4 $16 Rae8??
{the final mistake, not that it matters anymore}
(25... Bxf5 26. gxf5 (26. Nxf5?! h5 $11 (26... Kxg4 {is not directly
advisable since it leads to the following attractive mate} 27. Nh6+
Kg5 28. Nf7+ Kg4 29. Rg1+ Kf4 30. Rg3 Rhg8 31. Rf3+ Kg4 32. Bf5+ Kh4
33. Rh3#)) 26... Kf4 27. Re1 $16)
26. Ng7
(26. Nf3+ $142 {and the result of the game is clear: White will win}
Kf4 27. Rh4 Re2+ 28. Kxe2 Bxf5 29. Bxf5 $18)
26... Bxd3 27. Nxe8 Be4
(27... Rxe8 $142 28. cxd3 Kxg4 29. Rxh7 Rb8 $18)
28. Nf3+??
{spoils everything}
(28. Rh5+ $142 {finishes off the opponent} Kg6 29. Nd6 $18)
28... Bxf3
(28... Kf4!? $142 29. Nxf6 Bxf3 $19)
29. Kxf3 $15 Rxe8 30. Rxh7 Rb8 31. Rg7+ Kh6 32. Re7 Kg6 33. Rd7 a5 34. Rd6
(34. Kf4 a4 $15) 34... Kf7 (34... Rh8 35. Kg3 $17) 35. Kf4??
{further deteriorates the position}
(35. Rd7+ $142 Ke6 36. Rc7 $15)
35... Ke7 $19
(35... Ke7 36. Rxd5 cxd5 $19)
0-1

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, New York"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Fischler, Matthew"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "1907"]
[Annotator "Fritz 8 (10s)"]
[PlyCount "70"]
[EventDate "2004.??.??"]

{A00: Irregular Openings}
1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 e5 3. c4 {last book move} 3... c6 4. cxd5 cxd5 5. Qb3 Ne7
({Inferior is} 5... Bxg4 6. Qxb7 Nd7 7. Qxd5 $11)
6. Nc3 Nbc6 7. Nxd5 (7. h3!? $142 $17) 7... Nd4 $19
({Worse is} 7... Bxg4 8. Qxb7 Rb8 9. Qa6 $11)
8. Qc4 Nec6??
{there were better ways to keep up the pressure}
(8... Nxd5 $142 {Black clearly has the better chances} 9. Bxd5 b5
10. Bxf7+ Ke7 $19)
9. e3 $11 Ne6 10. Ne2 Bd6 11. a3 {Covers b4} Bd7 12. b4 Rc8 13. Qa2
(13. Qd3 e4 14. Qxe4 O-O $14)
13... h5
(13... Nc7!? $15 {should be examined more closely})
14. gxh5 Rxh5 (14... Qh4!? $14) 15. Ng3 Rg5 (15... Rh8!? $142 $16)
16. h4 Rxg3 17.fxg3 e4 18. Nf4 Nxf4 19. exf4
(19. gxf4 $142 {the advantage is on the side of White} Bxb4
20. Bxe4 $18)
19... Nd4 $16 20. O-O
(20. Bxe4 Qe7 21. d3 $16)
20... Rc2?
(20... Ne2+ $142 {is a viable option} 21. Kh2 Bxf4 22. Rxf4 Nxf4
23. Bxe4 Be6 $11)
21. Qd5 $18 Bc6 22. Qxd4??
{White has let it slip away}
(22. Qh5 $142 $16)
22... Bc5 $19 {Theme: Clearance for d8-d4} 23. Qxc5
(23. bxc5 Qxd4+ {A double attack})
23... Rxc5 24. bxc5 Qd4+ 25. Kh2 Qxa1 26. Re1 f5 27. d3??
{the pressure is too much, White crumbles}
(27. g4 $142 $17)
27... Qc3 $19 28. Rd1 Qc2
({Less advisable is} 28... exd3 29. Be3 Qxa3 30. Bxc6+ bxc6
31. Rd2 $19)
29. Re1
(29. Rg1 {doesn't get the bull off the ice} exd3 30. Be3 d2 31. Bxc6+
bxc6 32. Bxd2 Qxd2+ 33. Rg2 Qe3 $19)
29... Kf7
(29... e3 $142 {might be the shorter path} 30. Rg1 Bxg2 31. Rxg2 Qxc1
32. h5 $19)
30. Kh3
(30.dxe4 {a fruitless try to alter the course of the game} Bxe4
(30... fxe4?! 31. Be3 $19) 31. Rxe4 fxe4 $19 (31... Qxc1?! {is
clearly worse} 32. Re5 $11))
30... Qxd3
({Instead of} 30... exd3 31. Bxc6 bxc6 32. Be3 $19)
31. Bf1
(31. Re3 {is one last hope} Qd1 32. Bb2 $19)
31... Qc3 32. Rd1 Qc2 33. Re1 Qf2 34. Rd1
(34. Bc4+ {does not help much} Ke7 35. Rh1 $19)
34... Qg1
(34... e3 35. Bxe3 Qf3 36. Bc4+ Kf8 37. Rg1 Qxe3 38. Rg2 Qf3 39. Bd5
Bxd5 40. Rg1 g5 41. fxg5 f4 42. a4 Be6+ 43. Kh2 Qf2+ 44. Rg2 fxg3+
45. Kh1 Qe1+ 46. Rg1 Bd5#)
35. g4
(35. Bc4+ $142 {and White takes home the point} Ke7 36. Rxg1 $18)
35... fxg4# 0-1


Dave.
--
David Richerby Portable Atom Bomb (TM): it's like
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ a weapon of mass destruction but you
can take it anywhere!
  #5   Report Post  
Old March 29th 04, 02:21 PM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sam's Comeback Fails

On 28 Mar 2004 16:37:26 +0100 (BST), David Richerby
wrote:

Sam Sloan wrote:
I managed to sacrifice something each game. Too bad I lost two of
them. I would like somebody to check these games with Fritz, because
I think my sacrifices were likely sound.


Fritz doesn't like the exchange sac in the first game and doesn't think
much of the knight sac, either. It's happy with your exchange of two
knights for rook and two pawns in the second game but judges the position
to be equal after your opponent won back the pawn and got the queens off.
As you, yourself, said, the exchange fest in the third game is unsound
because of 24... Qd4+. Fritz's commentary is at the end of the post.


My third game was upsetting. I had my opponent beat easily. I nearly
caught in a trap I invented while I was in prison in 1978 in
Jalalabad, Afghanistan as a political prisoner. I had a pocket chess
set with me while in prison, so naturally I worked on my openings.
This and my "Jalalabad Defense" (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 c5) are my two major
discoveries from this time. Unfortunately, in the intervening 26
years, only one person has fallen into my trap (and I am not going to
tell you what it is, by the way).


Fritz isn't at all impressed with the `Jalalabad trap', suggesting


I started off with a solid opening line as usual and I believe that I
had an early advantage.


The Grob is solid these days? Fritz gives you +/= after 14.Bxf4 but =/+
if your opponent had played 13... g6 14.Qh6 Bf8.


By move 19 he threatened to win my rook with 20. ... Bxf3. Rather than
defend my rook, I decided to sacrifice it for what I hoped would be a
mating attack.


Fritz evaluates -+ at this point.


I was surprised when he played 21... hxg6, which enabled me to threaten
mate. I expected 21... fxg6 22. Qxd5+ Rf7 23. Ng5 This position is
unclear and this is one of the positions I would like for somebody to
check with Fritz.


You've overlooked 22... Kh8, after which Fritz puts you about a pawn up.
22... Rf7 is losing as, after 23.Ng5, Black drops a whole rook after
either 23... Qc7 24.Nxf7 Qxf7 25.Qxe6 or 23... Rf8 24.Nxf7 Rxf7 25.Re6.
I'm surprised you didn't spot that.

Fritz's commentary on the games is as follows. The NAGs a

$11: =
$14: +/=
$15: =/+
$16: +/-
$17: -/+
$18: +-
$19: -+
$142: Better is

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Polyakin, Vladimir"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "2164"]
[Annotator "Fritz 8 (10s)"]
[PlyCount "73"]
[EventDate "2004.??.??"]

{A00: Irregular Openings}
1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 c6 3. h3 e5 4. e4 {last book move} 4... dxe4 5. Nc3
Nf6 6. g5 Nfd7 7. Nxe4 Nc5 8. d3 {Consolidates e4} 8... Nba6 9. a3
{Secures b4} 9... Nxe4 10. Bxe4 Nc5 11. Bg2 Be7 12. Qh5 Ne6 {The
pressure on g5 grows} 13. Nf3 Nf4
(13... g6!? {is worth looking at} 14. Qh6 Bf8 $15)
14. Bxf4 $14 exf4 15. O-O-O O-O 16. Rhe1 Be6 17. Re4 Bd6 18. Rde1 Bd5
19. Rd4?
(19. R4e2 $142 $11 {would keep White alive})
19... Qb6 $19 20. Rxd5 cxd5 21. g6 hxg6 22. Qh4?
(22. Qxd5 Rad8 23. Qd4 Qxd4 24. Nxd4 Bc5 $19)
22... f6??
{with this move Black loses his initiative}
(22... Rfe8 $142 {makes sure everything is clear} 23. d4 Qa5 $19)
23. Ng5 $17 {Clearance to allow g2-d5} 23... fxg5 24. Bxd5+ Rf7
25. Qxg5 f3
(25... Qd4 26. Re6 Bf8 27. Re4 $17)
26. Kb1
(26. Bxf7+ Kxf7 27. Qd5+ Kf8 28. Qxf3+ Kg8 29. Qd5+ Kh7 $15)
26... Bxa3
(26... Raf8!? $142 27. Qxg6 Qa5 (27... Qxf2?? {A poison
bait which should not be taken} 28. Re8 Qg1+ 29. Qxg1 Rxe8 30. Qg6 $18)
28. Bxf7+ Rxf7 29. Re8+ Bf8 $17)
27. Bxf7+ $11 Kxf7 28. Qd5+??
{letting the wind out of his own sails}
(28. Qf4+ $142 {this is the best bet to save the position} Kg8
29. Qc4+ Kf8 30. Qf4+ Kg8 31. Qc4+ Kh7 32. Qh4+ Kg8 33. Qc4+ $11)
28... Kf8 $19 29. Qxf3+ Kg8 30. Qd5+ Kh7 31. b3 Qf6
(31... Rd8 {seems even better} 32. Qg5 Qd4 33. Qe5 Qxf2 34. Re2 $19)
32. d4
(32. Re5 Re8 33. d4 Rxe5 34. Qxe5 Qxf2 $19)
32... Rd8 33. Qa5 Qd6
(33... Qxf2 {keeps an even firmer grip} 34. Rd1 Rc8 35. Qd2 Qxd2
36. Rxd2 $19)
34. Qxa7 (34. Re4 $142 $19) 34... Rd7??
{a transit from better to worse}
(34... Bb4!? $142 {and Black can already relax} 35. Rd1 Bc3 $19)
35. Re4
(35. Re8 Rf7 36. Qa8 g5 37. Rh8+ Kg6 $17)
35... g5
(35... b5 36. Qa5 b4 37. Rh4+ Kg8 38. Qb5 $17)
36. Qa4
(36. Qa5 Qg6 37. Re2 Bf8 $17)
36... Bb4 37. Kb2 {Zeit}
(37. Qb5!? $142 $17)
0-1


[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, NYC"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Barkman, Peter J"]
[Black "Sloan, Sam"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A40"]
[WhiteElo "1934"]
[BlackElo "1940"]
[Annotator "Fritz 8 (10s)"]
[PlyCount "70"]
[EventDate "2004.??.??"]

{A40: Unusual replies to 1 d4}
1. d4 e5 2. dxe5 Nc6 3. Nf3 Qe7 {last book move} 4. e4 Nxe5 5. Be2
(5. Nc3 Nf6 $14) 5... Nf6 6. O-O Nxe4 7. Qd5 Ng4 8. Nfd2
(8. Qd4!? $142 $11 {might be a viable alternative})
8... Nexf2 9. Rxf2 Nxf2 10. Kxf2 Qh4+ 11. Kf1 Qxh2 12. Qe4+ Be7 13. Nc3 c6
{Controls b5} 14. Nf3 Qh1+ 15. Kf2 d5 16. Qxe7+ {Eliminates the
defender e7} 16... Kxe7 {Decoy to e7} 17. Bg5+ {Discovered attack}
17... f6 18. Bxf6+ {Demolishes the pawn shield} 18... gxf6 (18... Kxf6
19. Rxh1) 19. Rxh1 $11 Bf5 20. Nd4 Bg6 21. g4 Kd6 22. Nf5+ {The knight
dominates} (22. Bd3 Rae8 $11) 22... Ke5
(22... Bxf5!? 23. gxf5 Ke5 $15)
23. Bd3 $11 Kf4 24. Ne2+ Kg5
(24... Ke5!? $14 {is worthy of consideration})
25. Ned4 $16 Rae8??
{the final mistake, not that it matters anymore}
(25... Bxf5 26. gxf5 (26. Nxf5?! h5 $11 (26... Kxg4 {is not directly
advisable since it leads to the following attractive mate} 27. Nh6+
Kg5 28. Nf7+ Kg4 29. Rg1+ Kf4 30. Rg3 Rhg8 31. Rf3+ Kg4 32. Bf5+ Kh4
33. Rh3#)) 26... Kf4 27. Re1 $16)
26. Ng7
(26. Nf3+ $142 {and the result of the game is clear: White will win}
Kf4 27. Rh4 Re2+ 28. Kxe2 Bxf5 29. Bxf5 $18)
26... Bxd3 27. Nxe8 Be4
(27... Rxe8 $142 28. cxd3 Kxg4 29. Rxh7 Rb8 $18)
28. Nf3+??
{spoils everything}
(28. Rh5+ $142 {finishes off the opponent} Kg6 29. Nd6 $18)
28... Bxf3
(28... Kf4!? $142 29. Nxf6 Bxf3 $19)
29. Kxf3 $15 Rxe8 30. Rxh7 Rb8 31. Rg7+ Kh6 32. Re7 Kg6 33. Rd7 a5 34. Rd6
(34. Kf4 a4 $15) 34... Kf7 (34... Rh8 35. Kg3 $17) 35. Kf4??
{further deteriorates the position}
(35. Rd7+ $142 Ke6 36. Rc7 $15)
35... Ke7 $19
(35... Ke7 36. Rxd5 cxd5 $19)
0-1

[Event "4 Rated Games Tonight!"]
[Site "Marshall Chess Club, New York"]
[Date "2004.03.25"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Fischler, Matthew"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "1940"]
[BlackElo "1907"]
[Annotator "Fritz 8 (10s)"]
[PlyCount "70"]
[EventDate "2004.??.??"]

{A00: Irregular Openings}
1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 e5 3. c4 {last book move} 3... c6 4. cxd5 cxd5 5. Qb3 Ne7
({Inferior is} 5... Bxg4 6. Qxb7 Nd7 7. Qxd5 $11)
6. Nc3 Nbc6 7. Nxd5 (7. h3!? $142 $17) 7... Nd4 $19
({Worse is} 7... Bxg4 8. Qxb7 Rb8 9. Qa6 $11)
8. Qc4 Nec6??
{there were better ways to keep up the pressure}
(8... Nxd5 $142 {Black clearly has the better chances} 9. Bxd5 b5
10. Bxf7+ Ke7 $19)
9. e3 $11 Ne6 10. Ne2 Bd6 11. a3 {Covers b4} Bd7 12. b4 Rc8 13. Qa2
(13. Qd3 e4 14. Qxe4 O-O $14)
13... h5
(13... Nc7!? $15 {should be examined more closely})
14. gxh5 Rxh5 (14... Qh4!? $14) 15. Ng3 Rg5 (15... Rh8!? $142 $16)
16. h4 Rxg3 17.fxg3 e4 18. Nf4 Nxf4 19. exf4
(19. gxf4 $142 {the advantage is on the side of White} Bxb4
20. Bxe4 $18)
19... Nd4 $16 20. O-O
(20. Bxe4 Qe7 21. d3 $16)
20... Rc2?
(20... Ne2+ $142 {is a viable option} 21. Kh2 Bxf4 22. Rxf4 Nxf4
23. Bxe4 Be6 $11)
21. Qd5 $18 Bc6 22. Qxd4??
{White has let it slip away}
(22. Qh5 $142 $16)
22... Bc5 $19 {Theme: Clearance for d8-d4} 23. Qxc5
(23. bxc5 Qxd4+ {A double attack})
23... Rxc5 24. bxc5 Qd4+ 25. Kh2 Qxa1 26. Re1 f5 27. d3??
{the pressure is too much, White crumbles}
(27. g4 $142 $17)
27... Qc3 $19 28. Rd1 Qc2
({Less advisable is} 28... exd3 29. Be3 Qxa3 30. Bxc6+ bxc6
31. Rd2 $19)
29. Re1
(29. Rg1 {doesn't get the bull off the ice} exd3 30. Be3 d2 31. Bxc6+
bxc6 32. Bxd2 Qxd2+ 33. Rg2 Qe3 $19)
29... Kf7
(29... e3 $142 {might be the shorter path} 30. Rg1 Bxg2 31. Rxg2 Qxc1
32. h5 $19)
30. Kh3
(30.dxe4 {a fruitless try to alter the course of the game} Bxe4
(30... fxe4?! 31. Be3 $19) 31. Rxe4 fxe4 $19 (31... Qxc1?! {is
clearly worse} 32. Re5 $11))
30... Qxd3
({Instead of} 30... exd3 31. Bxc6 bxc6 32. Be3 $19)
31. Bf1
(31. Re3 {is one last hope} Qd1 32. Bb2 $19)
31... Qc3 32. Rd1 Qc2 33. Re1 Qf2 34. Rd1
(34. Bc4+ {does not help much} Ke7 35. Rh1 $19)
34... Qg1
(34... e3 35. Bxe3 Qf3 36. Bc4+ Kf8 37. Rg1 Qxe3 38. Rg2 Qf3 39. Bd5
Bxd5 40. Rg1 g5 41. fxg5 f4 42. a4 Be6+ 43. Kh2 Qf2+ 44. Rg2 fxg3+
45. Kh1 Qe1+ 46. Rg1 Bd5#)
35. g4
(35. Bc4+ $142 {and White takes home the point} Ke7 36. Rxg1 $18)
35... fxg4# 0-1


Dave.
--
David Richerby Portable Atom Bomb (TM): it's like
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ a weapon of mass destruction but you
can take it anywhere!


Thank you so much for the detailed analysis, which I will put in my
computer and study when I have time.

Sam Sloan


  #6   Report Post  
Old March 29th 04, 07:42 PM
Karl Heck
 
Posts: n/a
Default Mr. Z..

...I am sure many people wish he had "Z'ed out" Sam....

--
Karl Heck




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  #7   Report Post  
Old March 30th 04, 03:44 AM
Nick
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sam's Comeback Fails

(Sam Sloan) wrote in message ...
Sam's Comeback Fails
(snipped)
...but this gives him "sente", to use a Japanese term from Go.


'Sente' may be translated approximately as 'initiative'.

Next game. I worked out a brilliant win on move 8.
Here is what could have happened:

1.d4 e5 2.dxe5 Nc6 3.Nf3 Qe7 4.e4 Nxe5 5.Be2 Nf6 6.O-O Nxe4 7.Qd5 Ng4
8.Nfd2 Nexf2

Here, I expected him to play 9. Re1, threatening to win my queen with Bxg5.
Then, I planned to play 9. ... Qe3!! This could be followed by 10. Nf3 Nh3+
(double check!!) 11. Kh1 N4f2++ or 11. Kf1 Qf2++ mate either way. There are
many variations here. All of them end with double check followed by mate.


"Here is what *could* have happened."
--Sam Sloan

If chess *were* played only in the subjunctive mood, then Sam Sloan
*could* become the world champion. :-)

My cowardly opponent instead just took my knight.
I still won the game, but it took a long time.


According to Herodatus, the Persians, who were led by Darius, invaded the
lands of the Scythians, who kept avoiding any pitched battles, forcing the
Persians to pursue them and deplete their supplies. At last, Darius sent
a message to Idanthyrsus, the Scythian king, which stated, in effect:
'I cannot understand your cowardly behaviour. Either come openly before me
and fight like a man or surrender now!' Idanthyrsus replied: 'Go weep.'
And eventually the exhausted Persians were forced to make an ignominious
retreat back to their homeland.

...I probably took an unnecessary risk by bringing my king to the center
of the board, but I often do that. I got that habit from shogi.


Does IM Larry Kaufman, an experienced player of shogi, also have that habit?

In the final rook and pawn ending I was a pawn up.
I know how to win these these without difficulty.


Many rook endgames offer at least plausible drawing chances for
the player who's one pawn down.

Fortunately, he was out of time and allowed me to trap his rook....


Yes, it tends to be easier for someone to win a 'rook and pawn' endgame
when one has a rook and one's opponent does not have a rook. :-)

--Nick
  #9   Report Post  
Old March 30th 04, 08:18 AM
Angelo DePalma
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sam's Comeback Fails



"Sam Sloan" wrote

Just to let you know, I am a rated 2-dan player of shogi. This makes
me something like the number 4 or 5 shogi player who was born in the
USA.


My brother's name is Dan. My grandfather's name was Dan. I have a friend
named Dan. The friend and brother were born here, but g'father was born in
Italy. That makes them 3 Dans. Where is Win Moe when we need him?

Sayonara,



Larry Kaufman is either a 4-dan or 5-dan player of shogi, so he is the
best native born US player of shogi.

Sam Sloan



  #10   Report Post  
Old March 30th 04, 11:48 AM
Tim Hanke
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sam's Comeback Fails

"Angelo DePalma" wrote ...


"Sam Sloan" wrote

Just to let you know, I am a rated 2-dan player of shogi. This makes
me something like the number 4 or 5 shogi player who was born in the
USA.


My brother's name is Dan. My grandfather's name was Dan. I have a friend
named Dan. The friend and brother were born here, but g'father was born in
Italy. That makes them 3 Dans. Where is Win Moe when we need him?


It was so cold in Newburyport this winter, we had a whole month of 3-dog
nights.

Tim Hanke


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