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Old April 5th 04, 09:10 PM
Toni Lassila
 
Posts: n/a
Default Blunders ahoy!

Here's a match between two amateurs (like you don't notice):

[Event "Friendly match"]
[Site "Espoo"]
[Date "05-04-2004"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Lassila"]
[Black "Michelsson"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. Nf3 Nc6 2. e4 e5 3. d4 d6 4. d5 Na5 5. Bb5+ Bd7 6. Nc3 Bxb5 7. Nxb5
Qd7 8. Nc3 f5 9. Ng5 h6 10. Qh5+ Ke7 11. Qf7+ Kd8 12. Qxf8+ Qe8 13.
Qf7 hxg5 14. Bxg5+ Ne7 15. Qe6 Qf8 16. exf5 Rh5 17. Bxe7+ Qxe7 18. g4
Rg5 19. Rg1 Qxe6 20. fxe6 c6 21. dxc6 bxc6 22. O-O-O d5 23. Nxd5 cxd5
24. Rxd5+ Ke7 25. Rxa5 Kxe6 26. f4 1-0

I feel 5. Bb5+ is a waste of tempo that doesn't capitalize on the
advanced d-pawn. What would have been a better choice?

9...h6?? is obviously a blunder that costs black the game, but is
there some play left after it? I failed to notice that 13. Nf7+ Kd7
14. Qxg7 Ne7 15. Qf6 Qg8 16. Qe6+ Ke8 17. Nxh8 wins an exchange. Could
this be avoided somehow?

Then there's 20. dxe6 Nc6 21. h4 which would have captured the rook
but I missed that one and chose 20. fxe6 since it put pressure on the
queenside where I was planning to attack after 22. O-O-O.
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Old April 5th 04, 10:15 PM
David Richerby
 
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Default Blunders ahoy!

Toni Lassila wrote:
[Event "Friendly match"]
[Site "Espoo"]
[Date "05-04-2004"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Lassila"]
[Black "Michelsson"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. Nf3 Nc6 2. e4 e5 3. d4 d6 4. d5 Na5 5. Bb5+ Bd7 6. Nc3 Bxb5 7. Nxb5
Qd7 8. Nc3 f5 9. Ng5 h6 10. Qh5+ Ke7 11. Qf7+ Kd8


11.Ne6+ Qxe6 (11... Kc8 12.Qxf8+ Qd8 3.Qxd8#) 12.Qxe6 +-


Dave.

--
David Richerby Homicidal Confusing Watch (TM): it's
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ like a precision chronometer but you
can't understand it and it wants to
kill you!
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Old April 6th 04, 02:52 AM
Ron
 
Posts: n/a
Default Blunders ahoy!

In article ,
Toni Lassila wrote:

Here's a match between two amateurs (like you don't notice):

[Event "Friendly match"]
[Site "Espoo"]
[Date "05-04-2004"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Lassila"]
[Black "Michelsson"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. Nf3 Nc6 2. e4 e5 3. d4 d6 4. d5 Na5 5. Bb5+ Bd7 6. Nc3 Bxb5 7. Nxb5
Qd7 8. Nc3 f5 9. Ng5 h6 10. Qh5+ Ke7 11. Qf7+ Kd8 12. Qxf8+ Qe8 13.
Qf7 hxg5 14. Bxg5+ Ne7 15. Qe6 Qf8 16. exf5 Rh5 17. Bxe7+ Qxe7 18. g4
Rg5 19. Rg1 Qxe6 20. fxe6 c6 21. dxc6 bxc6 22. O-O-O d5 23. Nxd5 cxd5
24. Rxd5+ Ke7 25. Rxa5 Kxe6 26. f4 1-0

I feel 5. Bb5+ is a waste of tempo that doesn't capitalize on the
advanced d-pawn. What would have been a better choice?


Yeah. I'm not crazy about it. It invites c6. Although the idea of
swapping off light-squared bishops isn't terrible here, I think white
will end up weak on the light squares if he does so. That's one of those
complex positional calculations that is beyond my abilty to judge
properly. (The other piece of the positional puzzle here is that you
have more space, and to keep him cramped you don't want to trade pieces.
So for these reasons I'd probably not swap of light squared bishops
here, which you have to be prepared to do to play Bb5+)

What I don't like is that you've played Nc3 before c4 here. I think
that c4, supporting your center, is absolutely neccesary. So 5.c4
suggests itself on positional grounds, but you're missing a winning
tactic.

(Maybe I'm pointing out these things in reverse order, but what the hey.)

Take a look at that knight. You should notice right away that it's
offside, and you don't want to help it get back into the game. (Which
you do after Bb5+ c6 dc Nxc6). But if you notice that it's got no easy
way back into the game, you might notice that it doesn't have any flight
squares.

So 5.b4! wins the knight and, with it, the game.

9...h6?? is obviously a blunder that costs black the game, but is
there some play left after it? I failed to notice that 13. Nf7+ Kd7
14. Qxg7 Ne7 15. Qf6 Qg8 16. Qe6+ Ke8 17. Nxh8 wins an exchange. Could
this be avoided somehow?


Why'd you play Ng5?

If you played it for the check, shame on you. Don't play for traps. But
if you played it because you were planning Ne6! then give yourself a
gold star. You need to make sure that it's not going to be easy for him
to swap off when it gets there (Nf6-h5 planning Nf4 can be cut off with
g3.)

14.Qxe8+ in the above line before Nxh8 is better. Get the queens off to
reduce play. It's tricky to see because the queen looks like it's
hanging but for the check.

More than 17. Bxe7+ I like Ne4! where the threat of f6! becomes so
strong that black's best choiec may be to sacrifice the exchange to
reduce the pressure. (say, 17.Ne4 Nc4?? 18.f6! where a knight move is
met by fg+, Rxg5 by fe+ followed by Nxg5 (with Qxg5 met by Qg8+ winning
the a8-rook. and 18. ... ef is met by Nxf6 where the double attack (mate
on d7 and the attack on the rook) wins the rook outright.

This may all be a little complicated for you, so while I'd try to sort
it all out, I'll offer a guiding principle:

If you're trying to attack the king, don't consent to piece trades
unless you get some sort of compensation, such as a winning endgame.

The endgame is favorable to you, ehre, but are you comfortable trying
to win it?

Then there's 20. dxe6 Nc6 21. h4 which would have captured the rook
but I missed that one and chose 20. fxe6 since it put pressure on the
queenside where I was planning to attack after 22. O-O-O.


After fxe6, it's no longer about attacking his king. You're eventually
going to queen your new e-pawn. I have a preference for dxe6 in the
because you're winning with your protected passed pawn on the sixth (and
a pair of extra pawns to boot).

c6 is, in fact, why I prefer capturing with the d-pawn. He's trying to
undermine your advanced pawn so he can win it. But if he tries that on
the kingside with g6 (after dxe6) then he's going to give you a passed
h-pawn.

22.0-0-0 is a mistake. Your king is actually better placed in the
center, where it can support your pawns. He should probably play 22.
Ke7, threatening to win your advanced-and-no-longer-protected passed
pawn. If you played 22.0-0-0 because of the tactics that follow (that
is, you saw them alerady) then you get a pass, ehre, but Rd1 is probably
still a better move.

That's a nice tactic with nxd5. Ironic that the misplaced knight is
finally captured here. Of course, if he had dodged it with Ke7, you're
still in a dogfight. You should win the ending, especially if you see
23.Ne4 Rg6 24.Rxd6 Rxe6 25.Rxe6 Kxe6 26. Rd1 cutting his king off from
the queenside.
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Old April 6th 04, 10:14 AM
Toni Lassila
 
Posts: n/a
Default Blunders ahoy!

On Mon, 05 Apr 2004 18:52:04 -0700, Ron
wrote:

In article ,
Toni Lassila wrote:

1. Nf3 Nc6 2. e4 e5 3. d4 d6 4. d5 Na5 5. Bb5+ Bd7 6. Nc3 Bxb5 7. Nxb5
Qd7 8. Nc3 f5 9. Ng5 h6 10. Qh5+ Ke7 11. Qf7+ Kd8 12. Qxf8+ Qe8 13.
Qf7 hxg5 14. Bxg5+ Ne7 15. Qe6 Qf8 16. exf5 Rh5 17. Bxe7+ Qxe7 18. g4
Rg5 19. Rg1 Qxe6 20. fxe6 c6 21. dxc6 bxc6 22. O-O-O d5 23. Nxd5 cxd5
24. Rxd5+ Ke7 25. Rxa5 Kxe6 26. f4 1-0

I feel 5. Bb5+ is a waste of tempo that doesn't capitalize on the
advanced d-pawn. What would have been a better choice?


Yeah. I'm not crazy about it. It invites c6. Although the idea of
swapping off light-squared bishops isn't terrible here, I think white
will end up weak on the light squares if he does so.


I definately missed that bishop later on.

So 5.b4! wins the knight and, with it, the game.


So it does, but fortunately the hapless knight was useless until it's
sudden demise later on.

9...h6?? is obviously a blunder that costs black the game, but is
there some play left after it? I failed to notice that 13. Nf7+ Kd7
14. Qxg7 Ne7 15. Qf6 Qg8 16. Qe6+ Ke8 17. Nxh8 wins an exchange. Could
this be avoided somehow?


Why'd you play Ng5?


9. Ng5 was actually only made to support e4 and d5, I didn't expect to
be handed the game at that point.

If you're trying to attack the king, don't consent to piece trades
unless you get some sort of compensation, such as a winning endgame.


I was trying to win the game with the queen but couldn't see the few
lines that would have taken decisive material. Then the secondary plan
was to bring in the d- and f-pawns and force black to enter an
unfavourable position while swapping the queens. 19...Qxe6 was a
success in that aspect.

22.0-0-0 is a mistake. Your king is actually better placed in the
center, where it can support your pawns. He should probably play 22.
Ke7, threatening to win your advanced-and-no-longer-protected passed
pawn. If you played 22.0-0-0 because of the tactics that follow (that
is, you saw them alerady) then you get a pass, ehre, but Rd1 is probably
still a better move.


The castling was planned ahead but my opponent got 20...c6 first so it
negated my original idea of supporting the d-pawn with the rook. The
problem I see with Rd1 is that it removes the support for the g-pawn,
which prevents Ne4 and lets the black rook off the hook.
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Old April 6th 04, 06:47 PM
Ron
 
Posts: n/a
Default Blunders ahoy!

In article ,
Toni Lassila wrote:


The castling was planned ahead but my opponent got 20...c6 first so it
negated my original idea of supporting the d-pawn with the rook. The
problem I see with Rd1 is that it removes the support for the g-pawn,
which prevents Ne4 and lets the black rook off the hook.


Wrong rook. Rad1. You're kings in the way of the other rook, anyway.
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