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Old April 9th 04, 06:01 PM
Doctor Who
 
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Default HOW DO I IMPROVE AT CHESS???

can you please tell me how to become a master (USCF 2200) ??
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Old April 9th 04, 07:42 PM
Joe Nasal
 
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Default HOW DO I IMPROVE AT CHESS???

Take the red pill. No, wait...! I think it's the blue pill...

Oops. Right genre, wrong story. Try this: first, climb back into the
tardis and get your busty assistant to find your sonic screwdriver...

"Doctor Who" wrote in message
om...
can you please tell me how to become a master (USCF 2200) ??





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Old April 9th 04, 09:02 PM
EZoto
 
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Default HOW DO I IMPROVE AT CHESS???

On 9 Apr 2004 10:01:08 -0700, (Doctor Who) wrote:

can you please tell me how to become a master (USCF 2200) ??


Bribe the USCF. Sounds like they need the money.

EZoto
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Old April 10th 04, 05:15 AM
Neil Coward
 
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Default HOW DO I IMPROVE AT CHESS???

If there was a quick and easy foolproof way to get there we'd all be 2200
wouldn't we?

Without being 2200 myself I would say keep practising, if your natural
ability is good enough you will get there, if it isn't you won't.
The main thing is just to enjoy playing.



"Doctor Who" wrote in message
om...
can you please tell me how to become a master (USCF 2200) ??



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Old April 10th 04, 08:33 AM
Terry Wright
 
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Default HOW DO I IMPROVE AT CHESS???

can you please tell me how to become a master (USCF 2200) ??

Where do you start from ? Where are you standing today ?



Hire a master level instructor.
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Old April 13th 04, 07:07 AM
matt -`;'-
 
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Default HOW DO I IMPROVE AT CHESS???


"Doctor Who" wrote in message om...
can you please tell me how to become a master (USCF 2200) ??


I am not there myself, but have been reading the story of Leonid Stein who started from nowhere and without the help of a trainer
grew in Chess ability until he was able to become a IGM. I found a nice book on his life story and that has a nice collection of
his games, some of which include his own annotations, and all have annotations by a GM. This has become my favorite Chess book. The
book if you are interested:
http://www.jeremysilman.com/book_rev...sk_strtgy.html

My thoughts a
1) Get a few Chess books, especially on Tactics and Strategy.

2) You can practice Tactics on Endgames and Endgame-like Chess puzzles. Develop a good understanding of the basic Tactics of: Pins,
Revealed Attacks, Forks and practice them until you feel comfortable with them. When you understand these principles it will help
you with all of your game from the Openings, though the Midgame and into the Endgame. Get the basics down well, then you can add
some of the more complicated ones in later. Using more than one piece to accomplish a goal in Chess will become more obvious though
the learning of Tactics.

3) Study Openings. A good Chess Book would be helpful, especially one that the author spends the time to talk about each move of
the opening. The book should also take you through the King Pawn, Queen Pawn, Knight, Gambit Openings. After becoming familiar
with the openings it will be easier to choose the best moves when playing White or Black. You could memorize a few openings so you
will be able to recognize them on the board. It helps to know the Strategies applied for different openings.

4) Practice, practice, practice. I have at times sat down at lunch with a Chessboard and played both sides so that I could develop
an increased awareness of all the pieces on the board. At first this seems a little strange, but after a while you learn to play
both sides with enthusiasm and you begin to see Tactics and better moves. You should take the time to think about each move and not
try to play a hurried game. You can experiment with many openings this way. Of course it also helps to have another person to play,
but this is not a luxury we all have. I play online and against my computer. Variety is helpful because it shows you your
weakness.

5) Always study your losing games. You should self-analyze your games. Then you could run your game through Fritz if you have or
other similiar Chess program to get analysis. If you can find someone to analyze your games that would help also; there are times
when others will see something you may not see. You may want to analyze your winning games also because you may think you have done
well, and in a way you did, but you can still find some areas where you can become stronger.

6) Have fun! This is essential. You must have fun, even if you lose. I have lots of fun when I play against Shredder, ChessMaster
or Fritz, ow, ow, ow!

That's my thoughts. To grow stronger in Chess is like a journey - it takes many steps to get there. I know I would really like to
get to 2200 ELO or better, but it would take more time than I seem to have lately to gain that in the short run. I think if I was
more dedicated to this pursuit then I would attain it, but it does take effort, much effort, and I personally think that a training
partner to spar against would be invaluable; especially if they are dedicated to the same pursuits. Here is a thought, don't fall
into a psychological well worrying about your ELO, just put 200% into the game and see where it takes you.
HTH's, Matt



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