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Old April 10th 04, 10:16 PM
Dr. David Kirkby
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please check my analysis.

I played a game against someone the other day on ICC and won. Given he
was some 400 points higher, I was quite pleased with that.

I've annotated the game myself and would appreciate any comments by
others.


[Event "ICC 60 0"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2004.04.07"]
[Round "-"]
[White "NESKAYA"]
[Black "g8wrb"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1682"]
[BlackElo "1334"]
[ECO "C00"]
[ICCResult "White resigns"]
[Opening "French: advance, Paulsen attack"]
[NIC "FR.01"]
[Time "07:53:45"]
[TimeControl "3600+0"]

{This is one of my best games, in that I beat a player rated over
1700, whilst
being rated myself at under 1300. I've played NESYAKA before a few
months back
in Jan 2004 and lost, and again after this I played him again, and
lost. }
1.e4 e6 {My old favourite the French Defence. } 2.e5 {I was a bit
puzzled by
this. } 2...c5 {With hindsignt I think d5 would have been better, as
it kept a
pawn in the centre. Should white have played 3. exd6 (en-passant),
then
3....cxd6 would have let me two pawns in the centre. } 3.c3 {He seems
to be
making a lot of pawn moves. } 3...Nc6 {Seems sensible, to attack his
e-pawn. }
4.d4 {White attacks the centre. } 4...d5 {This seemed okay, as it
gives me more
control of the centre. Had white play 5. exd5 (or is is exd6 ??,
capturing
en-passant), 5...Bxd6 would have got my bishop developed, whilst
recapturing. }
5.Nf3 {Can't see it does much other than develop a piece, which is
important of
course, so its a good move. } 5...cxd4 {Tries to get more of the
centre. } 6.
cxd4 {But easily refused by white. } 6...Bb4+ {About the only sensible
square
to develop the bishop, with the possible exception of e2.} 7.Nc3
{Develops the
knight into a pinned position, but gets out of check. Other
althernatives might
have been Bd2. Not sure what was the best, but I think just possibly
this move.
} 7...Nge7 {Develops, leaving room to castle. } 8.Bb5 {Develops the
bishop,
whilst leaving room to castle and pinning blacks knight. } 8...Qb6!
{Attack on
the bishop, which is pinning my knight. Although the bishop is
'defended by the
knight on c3, that is itself pinned too.

Another option was to play 8...0-0, which would have unpinned the
knight, but
not attacked a piece.

} 9.Bxc6+ {White swaps a bishop for a knight, so ridding himself of
the attack.


} 9...bxc6 {I recaptured with the pawn. The other option was with the
knight
(9...Nxc6), but on the whole f6 is a good place for black's knight,
and staying
where it is, makes it easy to get back there. } 10.O-O {White's knight
is no
longer pinned, and his king made safer. } 10...Ba6 {Decent move,
developing the
bishop to a good square, where it immediatly threatens the white rook
on f1. Of
cours, it does not present white any real problems, as the rook is
easily moved
to the e-file. } 11.Re1 {Virtually forced. } 11...Nf5 {Don't know
quite what my
plan was here. I guess it is more centralised, although not presenting
an
immediate danger. } 12.a3 {White's knight was pinned against the rook,
which
could not be moved to any other square. His other option which was 12.
Bd2,
would have left the b2 pawn attacked if black moved his bishop
anywhere. Hence
white chases off the bishop. } 12...Bxc3 {I'm rather surprised white
did this -
swapping his knight for black's bishop. } 13.bxc3 {Virtually forced. }
13...O-O
{Not in any immediate danger, so perhaps a bit premature. } 14.a4
{Seems odd. I
would have thought 14 Bg5 would be more sensible, as it would connect
the rook
and queen on the first rank, whilst perhaps inducing black to advance
the
h-pawn, weaking his castled position - although I only do that if
really
necessary. } 14...Rfb8 {Black has siezed the open b-file with his
queen and
rook. } 15.Ba3 {White connects the rook and queen by moving his bishop
to a3.
This is probably better than the g5 I thought earlier. } 15...Bc4 {I
con't
recall what I was thinking here, but the bishop controls all the
diagonal id
did before a6 to f1, but in addition the b3 and a2 squares. So the
bishop could
be said to be in a better position. } 16.Bc5 {Not really sure of the
best
square to move the queen to. The b file could be dodgy} 16...Qa5 {This
attacks
the c3 pawn, so gives white something to do. He can't just ignore it.
} 17.Bb4
{Seems quite an obvious move.

The queen is being attacked several times now. It can't seem to avoid
this
unless it moves to an inactive part of the board. I did not want to do
that.
However, that said, this activity is all on the queens side, and
perhaps the
queen should have been moved over to the other side of the board,
where it
could threaten the king. } 17...Qa6 {Agan the queen moves. } 18.Nd2
{Not sure
this achieved much.

What was white's aim with this???} 18...Rb6 {I'm trying to connect my
rooks to
attack the b-file} 19.f4 {Not sure what white had in mind. }
19...Nxd4! {This
wins a pawn, as 20. cxd4 will be followed by 20...Rxb4. } 20.Bc5 {I
thought I
was in a mess here, as 20 Bc5 looked like it had saved the pawn, and
would win
a knight. But then then a good reply was noticed ....} 20...Nb3 {Now
it would
appear the pawn is secure, as 21 Rxb4, could be followed by Rxa1. I
did not see
up to this position when playing 19...Nxd4. Still, it worked out okay.
} 21.Ra3
{Clearly now the Black knight on b3 is attacked twice, and the rook on
b6.
Thankfully, that is easy to get around ....} 21...Nxc5 {This wins a
bishop for
black, putting me 4 points up, and should be in a good position to
win, although
this opponent's ICC rating is much better than mine, so I need to be
careful.

} 22.a5 {Not really an attack on the rook as it might appear, as the
pawn is
pinned. } 22...Rb2 {Not sure if I realised the pawn was pinned in the
match,
but moving the rook to the 7th rank is often a good idea, although its
not
obvious there is anything to pick up here. } 23.Nxc4 {Seems an odd
move for
white considering he is down in material. One would not normally
expect such an
opponent to swap pieces of equal value, as this will do. (Well,
assuming you
consider a knight and bishop equal). } 23...Qxc4 24.Qd4 {Again, seems
a bit
silly, to offer a swap of queens. } 24...Qxd4+ {Since I was 4 points
up in
material, a queen swap seemed a good idea.} 25.cxd4 {Virtyally forced.
} 25...
Rb3 {My knight on c5 is attacked, but this move gives white the option
of
swapping rooks. Again, since I'm up, I would like to do that. }
26.Raa1 {Black
is not so stupid. } 26...Nd3 {Attacks a backward pawn on f4. } 27.Re3
{This
move pins my knight on d3, so I can't take the backward pawn on f4.}
27...Rab8
{Now the knight is no longer pinned, so the white pawn on f4 is again
under
attack} 28.Rd1?? {Seems a blunder, as now the pawn on f4 can be safely
taken. }
28...Nxf4 {Now black is 5 points ahead after the capture of the white
f4 pawn.
} 29.Rxb3 {Why did white swap rooks ? } 29...Rxb3 {The white rook is
obviously
recaptured here.

White is now 5 points down, and seems in an impossible situation. }
30.g3 {
Knight attacked, but it is hardly a threat. White has a backward pawn
at d5 I'd
like to capture, as this would give me a passed pawn. However, its not
easy to
see exactly how to achive this, although with the 5 point material
advantage,
it should be possible. } 30...Ne2+ 31.Kf1 {Naturally white attacks the
knight,
and there is no obvious brilliant response, although black should win
now. }
31...Nc3 {If the black rook can be moved off the d-file, there is some
hope of
getting the pawn at d4. This attack achieves that. } 32.Rc1 {rook
moves, but
there is no easy way for black yet. } 32...Ra3 {Attack white's a pawn.
Now this
looks promising, as I can's see how it can be effectively defended. }
33.Kg2 {
I'm not sure what black feared. I was more interested in the pawn that
his king
for now. } 33...Kf8 {I'm fearing a back rank mate at some point, so
decide to
take action to avoid that possibilty. I don't want to mount an attack,
only to
realise I have to stop it because I can be mated on the back rank. }
34.Rc2?? {
White resigns} 0-1
  #2   Report Post  
Old April 11th 04, 08:21 AM
matt -`;'-
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please check my analysis.


"Dr. David Kirkby" m wrote in message
om...
I played a game against someone the other day on ICC and won. Given he
was some 400 points higher, I was quite pleased with that.

I've annotated the game myself and would appreciate any comments by
others.


Hi Dr. David,
I ran your game thru my organic CPU and annotated it with my impressions. I evaluated both sides moves. I added my comments after
yours, they begin with 2nd:, to indicate the second set of comments, and end with -m to indicate they were my comments. Well
without further ado, here they art:

[Event "ICC 60 0"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2004.04.07"]
[Round "-"]
[White "NESKAYA"]
[Black "g8wrb"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C00"]
[WhiteElo "1682"]
[BlackElo "1334"]
[Opening "French: advance, Paulsen attack"]
[NIC "FR.01"]
[Time "07:53:45"]
[TimeControl "3600+0"]
[ICCResult "White resigns"]


{This is one of my best games, in that I beat a player rated over 1700, whilst being rated myself at under 1300. I've played NESYAKA
before a few months back in Jan 2004 and lost, and again after this I played him again, and lost.

2nd: I annoted additional comments that begin with 2nd:, and end with -m.}
1. e4 e6 {My old favourite the French Defence.} 2. e5
{I was a bit puzzled by this.

2nd: W expected 2...d5 3.d4 to create a pressing diagonal pawn island. This would cramp B for space. -m}
2... c5
{With hindsignt I think d5 would have been better, as it kept a pawn in the centre. Should white have played 3. exd6 (en-passant),
then 3....cxd6 would have let me two pawns in the centre.

2nd: This move is actually good for B since if followed 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 chases the WQ and W loses a central pawn giving up half
the center. -m}
3. c3
{He seems to be making a lot of pawn moves.

2nd: W is expecting to followup with 4.d4 creating a pawn chain from b2 thru e4. -m}
(3. d4 {3.d4 loses a central pawn for W.} 3... cxd4 4. Qxd4 Nc6) 3... Nc6
{Seems sensible, to attack his e-pawn.} 4. d4
{White attacks the centre.

2nd: the main point is defense of e5 for if 4...cxd4 5.cxd4 and both e5 and d4 are safe. -m}
4... d5
{This seemed okay, as it gives me more control of the centre. Had white play 5. exd5 (or is is exd6 ??, capturing en-passant),
5...Bxd6 would have got my bishop developed, whilst recapturing.

2nd: This is a good move because it claims a piece of the center and if 5.exd6 Bxe6 then both sides are down a central pawn.
Otherwise if no ep then a sound center is held and B has more room to move. One important note is how both sides have no King
safety established by Castling. -m}
(4... cxd4 5. cxd4) 5. Nf3
{Can't see it does much other than develop a piece, which is important of course, so its a good move.

2nd: W prepares to Castle and adds protection to d4 via the Knight, Pawn and Queen. -m}
5... cxd4 {Tries to get more of the centre.

2nd: a temporary measure. -m} 6.
cxd4 {But easily refused by white.} 6... Bb4+
{About the only sensible square to develop the bishop, with the possible exception of e2.

2nd: Looks like a good choice because if 6...e2 then the g8-N would not be able to take advantage of e7 when making room to
Castle. -m}
7. Nc3
{Develops the knight into a pinned position, but gets out of check. Other althernatives might have been Bd2. Not sure what was the
best, but I think just possibly this move.

2nd: those are the only 2 good choices. -m}
7... Nge7
{Develops, leaving room to castle.

2nd: bravo, King Safety is important. -m}
8. Bb5
{Develops the bishop, whilst leaving room to castle and pinning blacks knight.

2nd: an offensive move, but does it really accomplish anything? I like 8.Be2 better. -m}
8... Qb6 $1
{Attack on the bishop, which is pinning my knight. Although the bishop is 'defended by the knight on c3, that is itself pinned too.
Another option was to play 8...0-0, which would have unpinned the knight, but not attacked a piece.

2nd: nicely done. The b5-Bishop has no protection because of the pinned Knight. This essentially forces a piece trade of B for N.
Its good to practice tactics, but this one really did not accomplish much other than to practice a tactic. -m}
9. Bxc6+ {White swaps a bishop for a knight, so ridding himself of the attack.}
9... bxc6
{I recaptured with the pawn. The other option was with the knight (9...Nxc6), but on the whole f6 is a good place for black's
knight, and staying where it is, makes it easy to get back there.

2nd: a seemingly stout choice because the now d6 pawn strengthens the center and could be used to attack d4 later. The other
options: Nxd6 protects the b4-Bishop, or Qxd6 is nice because it threatens with 10...Bxc3 11.bxc3 Qxc3 gaining a pawn and
threatening capture of the a1-Rook. -m}
(9... Qxc6 10. O-O Bxc3 11. bxc3 Qxc3) 10. O-O
{White's knight is no longer pinned, and his king made safer.} 10... Ba6
{Decent move, developing the bishop to a good square, where it immediatly threatens the white rook on f1. Of cours, it does not
present white any real problems, as the rook is easily moved to the e-file.

2nd: its a threat, but the B-King is not safe yet and a threat works best when it threatens more than one piece. Simply chasing
pieces around the board is usually not helpful. -m}
11. Re1 {Virtually forced.} 11... Nf5
{Don't know quite what my plan was here. I guess it is more centralised, although not presenting an immediate danger.

2nd: the B-King is still out in the open to a degree. Fortunately the congestion of the B pieces and lack of W development prevent
a direct attack. -m}
12. a3
{White's knight was pinned against the rook, which could not be moved to any other square. His other option which was 12. Bd2, would
have left the b2 pawn attacked if black moved his bishop anywhere. Hence white chases off the bishop.}
12... Bxc3
{I'm rather surprised white did this - swapping his knight for black's bishop.

2nd: usually Bishops are considered a little more valuable than Knights by most players. There are exceptions because of positional
considerations of course, but in this case the trade is good for White because of the multiple lines of attack from both B-Bishops
and the B-Queen. -m}
13. bxc3
{Virtually forced.

2nd: note how White now has a better pawn center. It is always good, but not always easy, to calculate the swapping of pieces in
captures. When you can picture this in your mind then it will make it easier to see the consequences of a particular move before
you make it. Knowing this has helped me. -m}
13... O-O
{Not in any immediate danger, so perhaps a bit premature.

2nd: it is best not to wait until a threat is on the Kings front porch before trying to make the King safe. -m}
14. a4
{Seems odd. I would have thought 14 Bg5 would be more sensible, as it would connect the rook and queen on the first rank, whilst
perhaps inducing black to advance the h-pawn, weaking his castled position - although I only do that if really necessary.

2nd: this move does not seem to help White. -m}
14... Rfb8
{Black has siezed the open b-file with his queen and rook.

2nd: nicely done. A good strong hold of the b file, positionally sound, but where does this go? -m}
15. Ba3
{White connects the rook and queen by moving his bishop to a3. This is probably better than the g5 I thought earlier.

2nd: this does not appear to help White. -m}
15... Bc4
{I con't recall what I was thinking here, but the bishop controls all the diagonal id did before a6 to f1, but in addition the b3
and a2 squares. So the bishop could be said to be in a better position.

2nd: the bishop was tying the Qeen down because it needed protection. Now the Q is free to move about the board, so this looks like
a good move. This position is one of the strongest for the Bishop. -m}
16. Bc5
{Not really sure of the best square to move the queen to. The b file could be dodgy

2nd: another chasing move, but it does not accomplish anything important. The strength of the W R-Q-R can be devastating after
16...Rab1. so 16...Qd8 may have been a good move to launch a K-side attack. 16...Qa5 is a possiblilty but it leaves little escape
avenues for the Queen. -m}
16... Qa5
{This attacks the c3 pawn, so gives white something to do. He can't just ignore it.}
17. Bb4
{Seems quite an obvious move. The queen is being attacked several times now. It can't seem to avoid this unless it moves to an
inactive part of the board. I did not want to do that. However, that said, this activity is all on the queens side, and perhaps the
queen should have been moved over to the other side of the board, where it could threaten the king.}
17... Qa6
{Agan the queen moves.

2nd: I have experienced problems when the Queen is too far from the action. I remeber a lost game because the Q was literally in
the corner. -m}
18. Nd2
{Not sure this achieved much. What was white's aim with this???

2nd: this move only seems to serve as an attack on the c4-Bishop. Not really a good enough reason for it. The B-King is still
waiting to be attacked. -m}
18... Rb6 {I'm trying to connect my rooks to attack the b-file} 19. f4
{Not sure what white had in mind.

2nd: its possible W was looking a few Knight hops ahead to launch a King attack. Maybe 20.Nf3 and 21.Ng5 followed by 22.Qh5 with
the idea of 23.Qxh2. Of course it would not be that easy, but at least the pieces are moving towards the B-King.}
19... Nxd4 $1
{This wins a pawn, as 20. cxd4 will be followed by 20...Rxb4.

2nd: a followup by White could have been 20.Nxc4 dxc4 21.Bc5 Rb3 22.Bxd4 Rab1. -m}
20. Bc5
{I thought I was in a mess here, as 20 Bc5 looked like it had saved the pawn, and would win a knight. But then then a good reply was
noticed ....}
(20. Nxc4 dxc4 21. Bc5 Rb3 22. Bxd4 Rab8) 20... Nb3
{Now it would appear the pawn is secure, as 21 Rxb4, could be followed by Rxa1. I did not see up to this position when playing
19...Nxd4. Still, it worked out okay.

2nd: 21.Bxb6 would have hurt Black. -m}
21. Ra3
{Clearly now the Black knight on b3 is attacked twice, and the rook on b6. Thankfully, that is easy to get around ....

2nd: this move does not gain ground or pieces. -m}
(21. Bxb6 Qxb6+ 22. Kh1) 21... Nxc5
{This wins a bishop for black, putting me 4 points up, and should be in a good position to win, although this opponent's ICC rating
is much better than mine, so I need to be careful.}
22. a5
{Not really an attack on the rook as it might appear, as the pawn is pinned.

2nd: moving the pawn out of the attack zone from the Black Q and N on a4. -m}
22... Rb2
{Not sure if I realised the pawn was pinned in the match, but moving the rook to the 7th rank is often a good idea, although its not
obvious there is anything to pick up here.}
23. Nxc4
{Seems an odd move for white considering he is down in material. One would not normally expect such an opponent to swap pieces of
equal value, as this will do. (Well, assuming you consider a knight and bishop equal).

2nd: not the best use for the Knight. -m}
23... Qxc4 24. Qd4 {Again, seems a bit silly, to offer a swap of queens.} 24...
Qxd4+ {Since I was 4 points up in material, a queen swap seemed a good idea.}
25. cxd4 {Virtyally forced.} 25... Rb3
{My knight on c5 is attacked, but this move gives white the option of swapping rooks. Again, since I'm up, I would like to do that.}
26. Raa1 {Black is not so stupid.} 26... Nd3
{Attacks a backward pawn on f4.

2nd: see the fork. -m} 27. Re3
{This move pins my knight on d3, so I can't take the backward pawn on f4.} 27...
Rab8
{Now the knight is no longer pinned, so the white pawn on f4 is again under attack}
28. Rd1 $4
{Seems a blunder, as now the pawn on f4 can be safely taken.

2nd: looks like White was tiring. -m}
28... Nxf4 {Now black is 5 points ahead after the capture of the white f4 pawn.}
29. Rxb3 {Why did white swap rooks ?

2nd: he was played out?. -m} 29... Rxb3
{The white rook is obviously recaptured here. White is now 5 points down, and seems in an impossible situation.}
30. g3
{Knight attacked, but it is hardly a threat. White has a backward pawn at d5 I'd like to capture, as this would give me a passed
pawn. However, its not easy to see exactly how to achive this, although with the 5 point material advantage, it should be possible.}
30... Ne2+ 31. Kf1
{Naturally white attacks the knight, and there is no obvious brilliant response, although black should win now.}
31... Nc3
{If the black rook can be moved off the d-file, there is some hope of getting the pawn at d4. This attack achieves that.}
32. Rc1 {rook moves, but there is no easy way for black yet.} 32... Ra3
{Attack white's a pawn. Now this looks promising, as I can's see how it can be effectively defended.

2nd: the game is over for White at this point, but if it was me I would play to the bitter end because I like to at least be a good
loser. -m}
33. Kg2
{I'm not sure what black feared. I was more interested in the pawn that his king for now.}
33... Kf8
{I'm fearing a back rank mate at some point, so decide to take action to avoid that possibilty. I don't want to mount an attack,
only to realise I have to stop it because I can be mated on the back rank.

2nd: keep the move g6 in mind. It is a move that is strong, yet gives the Black King room to move. -m}
34. Rc2 $4
{White resigns

2nd: nice game. White seems to have tired towards the end. It looks like you both could improve by studying tactics and also to
consider making every move count. The biggest weaknesses in this game were caused by those two factors. If you can learn to
coordinate your pieces better you will find strength. Practice endgames and endgame-like puzzles where you can apply and learn
tactics. -m}
0-1



  #3   Report Post  
Old April 11th 04, 07:38 PM
mdamien
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please check my analysis.

"Dr. David Kirkby" m wrote
in message om...
I played a game against someone the other day on ICC and won. Given he
was some 400 points higher, I was quite pleased with that.

I've annotated the game myself and would appreciate any comments by
others.


[Event "ICC 60 0"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2004.04.07"]
[Round "-"]
[White "NESKAYA"]
[Black "g8wrb"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1682"]
[BlackElo "1334"]
[ECO "C00"]
[ICCResult "White resigns"]
[Opening "French: advance, Paulsen attack"]
[NIC "FR.01"]
[Time "07:53:45"]
[TimeControl "3600+0"]

{This is one of my best games, in that I beat a player rated over
1700, whilst
being rated myself at under 1300. I've played NESYAKA before a few
months back
in Jan 2004 and lost, and again after this I played him again, and
lost. }
1.e4 e6 {My old favourite the French Defence. } 2.e5 {I was a bit
puzzled by
this. } 2...c5 {With hindsignt I think d5 would have been better, as
it kept a
pawn in the centre. Should white have played 3. exd6 (en-passant),
then
3....cxd6 would have let me two pawns in the centre. }


If we are to assume that 2. d4 is more accurate than 2. e5, then your move
2. ... c5 would seem the more accurate way to exploit this, since upon 2.
.... d5, White can play 3. d4 transposing to the Advance Variation.


3.c3 {He seems
to be
making a lot of pawn moves. }


With the point, though, to preserve a center pawn.

3...Nc6 {Seems sensible, to attack his
e-pawn. }
4.d4 {White attacks the centre. } 4...d5 {This seemed okay, as it
gives me more
control of the centre. Had white play 5. exd5 (or is is exd6 ??,
capturing
en-passant), 5...Bxd6 would have got my bishop developed, whilst
recapturing. }


If White plays 5. exd6 e.p., he's left with a weak isolated queen's pawn
after 5. ... cxd4.


5.Nf3 {Can't see it does much other than develop a piece, which is
important of
course, so its a good move. }


This is absolutely the correct move. All the action right now is focused on
d4. Now, the game has transposed into a standard Advance Variation.

5...cxd4 {Tries to get more of the
centre. }


Usually here Black will increase the pressure with Qb6, Nge7 (aiming toward
f5, or in some cases g6) or the flexible Bd7.

6.
cxd4 {But easily refused by white. } 6...Bb4+ {About the only sensible
square
to develop the bishop, with the possible exception of e2.}


Perhaps, then, it would make more sense to develop something else -- 6. Qb6
or 6. Bd7 (preventing checks along the a4-e8 diagonal and freeing the file
for the rook) or 6. Nge7. After 6. ... Bb4+, you really had to expect 7. Bd2
and then either exchanging bishops or retreating to e7 anyway, each with
loss of tempo. 6. ... Be7 is a good spot for the bishop, but you usually
want to get the king's knight out first via the e7 square.

7.Nc3
{Develops the
knight into a pinned position, but gets out of check. Other
althernatives might
have been Bd2. Not sure what was the best, but I think just possibly
this move.


I would prefer 7. Bd2, but either move calls Black's previous into question.

} 7...Nge7 {Develops, leaving room to castle. }


Yes. Keep in mind, though, that it's often dangerous to castle too soon in
this variation.

8.Bb5 {Develops the
bishop,
whilst leaving room to castle and pinning blacks knight. }


This move is almost always a mistake in the French Advance Variation. White
either wastes time (having to back the bishop up) or has to make an
unfavorable trade. 8. Bd3 or 8. Bd2 would have been fine.

8...Qb6!
{Attack on
the bishop, which is pinning my knight. Although the bishop is
'defended by the
knight on c3, that is itself pinned too.

Another option was to play 8...0-0, which would have unpinned the
knight, but
not attacked a piece.


Qb6 is a thematic move in this variation.


} 9.Bxc6+ {White swaps a bishop for a knight, so ridding himself of
the attack.


At this point, it would have been better to just concede the mistake and
play 9. Bd3. Black can't try to win the pawn at d4 because White would have
a discovered attack on the d4 square, with a check to back to b5. This
little "trick" is one of the reasons for an early Bd7 by Black.


} 9...bxc6 {I recaptured with the pawn. The other option was with the
knight
(9...Nxc6), but on the whole f6 is a good place for black's knight,
and staying
where it is, makes it easy to get back there. }


This was a tough choice. I think I would have taken with the knight so as to
play against a backward pawn in the semi-open c file (after Bxc3). Weakening
e5 has its merits too, though.

I guess you mean f5 with the knight. I'm not sure about that reasoning for
selected 9. ... bxc6, since the knight at c6 is bearing down on d4 as well,
and can't be driven away by g4. The square g6 is also a nice place for the
knight, and that would be in keeping with a plan of weakening e5 (that is,
after the pawn captures bxc6 and then pushes to c5).

10.O-O {White's knight
is no
longer pinned, and his king made safer. } 10...Ba6 {Decent move,
developing the
bishop to a good square, where it immediatly threatens the white rook
on f1. Of
cours, it does not present white any real problems, as the rook is
easily moved
to the e-file. }


Yes, but you have an active bishop, courtesy of White's plan of throwing his
own king's bishop away.

11.Re1 {Virtually forced. } 11...Nf5 {Don't know
quite what my
plan was here. I guess it is more centralised, although not presenting
an
immediate danger. }


In that case, O-O might have been a better idea.

12.a3 {White's knight was pinned against the rook,
which
could not be moved to any other square. His other option which was 12.
Bd2,
would have left the b2 pawn attacked if black moved his bishop
anywhere. Hence
white chases off the bishop. }


12. a3, as played, was the logical move. With the c file closed (Black's
choice on move 9), the backward c pawn won't be a significant problem, and
now Black's queen can come under attack in an open b file, gaining time to
secure it.

12...Bxc3 {I'm rather surprised white
did this -
swapping his knight for black's bishop. }


Why wouldn't White force this? He takes away Black's bishop pair. Note also
that this is Black's "good" bishop in relation to his pawns.

13.bxc3 {Virtually forced. }

Not just virtually forced, but absolutely forced.

13...O-O
{Not in any immediate danger, so perhaps a bit premature. }


It was OK, and probably the best move.

14.a4
{Seems odd. I
would have thought 14 Bg5 would be more sensible, as it would connect
the rook
and queen on the first rank, whilst perhaps inducing black to advance
the
h-pawn, weaking his castled position - although I only do that if
really
necessary. }


The idea behind a4 is to play Ba3, for the reasons you mention, but posting
the bishop on the strong a3-f8 diagonal.

14...Rfb8 {Black has siezed the open b-file with his
queen and
rook. }


I think the word "siezed" is a bit strong here, since White has been
planning to contest it. Black can force some massive exchanges, though, and
with best play the game would probably be drawn.

15.Ba3 {White connects the rook and queen by moving his bishop
to a3.
This is probably better than the g5 I thought earlier. } 15...Bc4 {I
con't
recall what I was thinking here, but the bishop controls all the
diagonal id
did before a6 to f1, but in addition the b3 and a2 squares. So the
bishop could
be said to be in a better position. }


It's reasonable, planning to meet Rb1 with 16. ... Bb3 or 16. ... Qa6 and
keeping the heavy pieces on the board. Simplifying with Qb3 was also worth
considering.

16.Bc5 {Not really sure of the
best
square to move the queen to. The b file could be dodgy}


White could also have played a5, or Nd2.

16...Qa5 {This
attacks
the c3 pawn, so gives white something to do. He can't just ignore it.
}


Sure, why not?

17.Bb4
{Seems quite an obvious move.

The queen is being attacked several times now. It can't seem to avoid
this
unless it moves to an inactive part of the board. I did not want to do
that.
However, that said, this activity is all on the queens side, and
perhaps the
queen should have been moved over to the other side of the board,
where it
could threaten the king. }


17. Qc2 was also reasonable.

17...Qa6 {Agan the queen moves. } 18.Nd2
{Not sure
this achieved much.

What was white's aim with this???}


It was a blunder. Now Black can play 18. ... Nxd4 and if 19. cxd4, 20. Rxb4.
White's idea, though, was presumably to trade a knight for a bishop, or to
try and maneuver around to c5, but these ideas were more practical at move
16.

18...Rb6 {I'm trying to connect my
rooks to
attack the b-file} 19.f4 {Not sure what white had in mind. }


OK, apparently his idea at move 19 was to free up the pawn and the d1-h5
diagonal for a kingside attack. This is a dubious plan.


19...Nxd4! {This
wins a pawn, as 20. cxd4 will be followed by 20...Rxb4. }


Yes, nice move. Now White is in a world of hurt.

20.Bc5 {I
thought I
was in a mess here, as 20 Bc5 looked like it had saved the pawn, and
would win
a knight. But then then a good reply was noticed ....} 20...Nb3 {Now
it would
appear the pawn is secure, as 21 Rxb4, could be followed by Rxa1. I
did not see
up to this position when playing 19...Nxd4. Still, it worked out okay.
}


20. ... Ne2+ would have been straightforward enough. Your move is good too,
though, because White is in check after 21. Bxb6 Qxb6+.

21.Ra3
{Clearly now the Black knight on b3 is attacked twice, and the rook on
b6.
Thankfully, that is easy to get around ....}


Yes, throwing a piece away is not helping White's cause.

21...Nxc5 {This wins a
bishop for
black, putting me 4 points up, and should be in a good position to
win, although
this opponent's ICC rating is much better than mine, so I need to be
careful.


It's always a good idea to be careful. I'll end my comments here. Well
played! I would not say that White displayed a rating any higher than
Black's in this game.

Matt


} 22.a5 {Not really an attack on the rook as it might appear, as the
pawn is
pinned. } 22...Rb2 {Not sure if I realised the pawn was pinned in the
match,
but moving the rook to the 7th rank is often a good idea, although its
not
obvious there is anything to pick up here. } 23.Nxc4 {Seems an odd
move for
white considering he is down in material. One would not normally
expect such an
opponent to swap pieces of equal value, as this will do. (Well,
assuming you
consider a knight and bishop equal). } 23...Qxc4 24.Qd4 {Again, seems
a bit
silly, to offer a swap of queens. } 24...Qxd4+ {Since I was 4 points
up in
material, a queen swap seemed a good idea.} 25.cxd4 {Virtyally forced.
} 25...
Rb3 {My knight on c5 is attacked, but this move gives white the option
of
swapping rooks. Again, since I'm up, I would like to do that. }
26.Raa1 {Black
is not so stupid. } 26...Nd3 {Attacks a backward pawn on f4. } 27.Re3
{This
move pins my knight on d3, so I can't take the backward pawn on f4.}
27...Rab8
{Now the knight is no longer pinned, so the white pawn on f4 is again
under
attack} 28.Rd1?? {Seems a blunder, as now the pawn on f4 can be safely
taken. }
28...Nxf4 {Now black is 5 points ahead after the capture of the white
f4 pawn.
} 29.Rxb3 {Why did white swap rooks ? } 29...Rxb3 {The white rook is
obviously
recaptured here.

White is now 5 points down, and seems in an impossible situation. }
30.g3 {
Knight attacked, but it is hardly a threat. White has a backward pawn
at d5 I'd
like to capture, as this would give me a passed pawn. However, its not
easy to
see exactly how to achive this, although with the 5 point material
advantage,
it should be possible. } 30...Ne2+ 31.Kf1 {Naturally white attacks the
knight,
and there is no obvious brilliant response, although black should win
now. }
31...Nc3 {If the black rook can be moved off the d-file, there is some
hope of
getting the pawn at d4. This attack achieves that. } 32.Rc1 {rook
moves, but
there is no easy way for black yet. } 32...Ra3 {Attack white's a pawn.
Now this
looks promising, as I can's see how it can be effectively defended. }
33.Kg2 {
I'm not sure what black feared. I was more interested in the pawn that
his king
for now. } 33...Kf8 {I'm fearing a back rank mate at some point, so
decide to
take action to avoid that possibilty. I don't want to mount an attack,
only to
realise I have to stop it because I can be mated on the back rank. }
34.Rc2?? {
White resigns} 0-1



  #4   Report Post  
Old April 11th 04, 10:25 PM
Ron
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please check my analysis.


6...Bb4+ {About the only sensible
square
to develop the bishop, with the possible exception of e2.}


I'm not realy crazy about this move, in part because the exchange Bxc3
ends up strengthening d4, which is your traditional target. Despite
being on the open file, c3 is usually an easier square to protect.



} 9...bxc6 {I recaptured with the pawn. The other option was with the
knight
(9...Nxc6), but on the whole f6 is a good place for black's knight,
and staying
where it is, makes it easy to get back there. }


I have to assume you mean f5, not f6.

I prefer Nxc6, especially if you're going to eventually play Bxc3, when
his weak c3 pawn will be backwards on an open file-- a nice target.

11. ... Nf5 is a very logical move-- attacking d4, his weakest square.

But I really don't like Bxc3-- the problem is that now your knight on
f5 really isn't doing very much, because d4 is solid as a rock. And
since you played bxc6 earlier, you can't really attack c3 very easily. I
would have strongly considered retreating to e7 and then playing -c5,
ganging up on the weak square.

17...Qa6 {Agan the queen moves. } 18.Nd2
{Not sure
this achieved much.


He wants to swap off the light-squared bishop. If he can force you to
recapture with a pawn, you'll have weak pawns all over the place.



19.f4 {Not sure what white had in mind. }


This is a common thematic move in the french, supporting the center. But
white's not really paying attention, at witnessed by your next move.
Furthermore, since you're not attacking e5, he shouldn't be worried
about protecting it with this move.

21.Ra3
{Clearly now the Black knight on b3 is attacked twice, and the rook on
b6.
Thankfully, that is easy to get around ....}


The losing move. 21.Nxb3 Bxb3 Qd4 and he's down a pawn, but there's a
lot of fight left in the position.

The story of this game is, I think, that you both made a lot of small
positional errors until he made a tactical one. He responded poorly to
the loss of a pawn and threw a knight away. Up until you win the pawn,
the game is even.

As they say, tactics tactics tactics. Although I must say white reacts
particualrly poorly to the fact that he's down a pawn.

23.Nxc4 {Seems an odd
move for
white considering he is down in material. One would not normally
expect such an
opponent to swap pieces of equal value, as this will do. (Well,
assuming you
consider a knight and bishop equal). }


You're absolutely correct to question this decision. It he's not going
to seek complications, he might as well resign. Nf3 considering moves
like Ng5 and Qh5 at least gives you the change to go wrong. He makes it
easy for you.

32.Rc1 {rook
moves, but
there is no easy way for black yet. } 32...Ra3 {Attack white's a pawn.
Now this
looks promising, as I can's see how it can be effectively defended. }


While this does win a pawn, you missed an easy opportunity to simplify
here with Rb1!; the rook is pinned, so you get the rooks off. Then you
simply activate your king and the game's easy.


33.Kg2 {
I'm not sure what black feared. I was more interested in the pawn that
his king
for now. } 33...Kf8 {I'm fearing a back rank mate at some point, so
decide to
take action to avoid that possibilty. I don't want to mount an attack,
only to
realise I have to stop it because I can be mated on the back rank. }
34.Rc2?? {
White resigns} 0-1


Not sure why you gave that move a ??. Again, the easiest win here is to
get rooks of, 34.Ra2!

I don't think you should be thinking in terms of "mounting an attack"
so Kf8 may have been the right move, albiet for the wrong reason. You
need to get your king active, because ni the endgame the king is a
fighting piece.

I would probably have 34. with the idea of bringing the N back to e4,
activating your king, and then playing c4 when you get a passed pawn
that should be decisive. The point is that by swapping rooks, you remove
his counterplay. You'll be able to pick up pawns later -- your king can
attack one pawn, your knight another, and his king won't be able to
defend both.

But so long as the rooks are on the board, you have a lot of
opportunities to screw it up to a tactic. At this point, you need to be
getting the rooks off and getting your king active.

Then the game's easy.

What he's going with Kg2 is activating his king-- turning it into a
fighting piece in the ending. This is a crucial concept-- arguably the
most important concept of endgame play. It's almost moot in this game,
but thinkg about it this way: if you leave your king on g8 (or f8) then
you're attackign with your rook and knight (two pieces) and he's
defending with his king and rook (two pieces) and he should be able to
keep it together. But the moment you start using your extra piece, you
can attack more than he can defend, and the win is easy.

-Ron
  #5   Report Post  
Old April 12th 04, 02:26 AM
Mark S. Hathaway
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please check my analysis.

Dr. David Kirkby wrote:
I played a game against someone the other day on ICC and won. Given he
was some 400 points higher, I was quite pleased with that.

I've annotated the game myself and would appreciate any comments by
others.



[Event "ICC 60 0"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2004.04.07"]
[Round "-"]
[White "NESKAYA"]
[Black "g8wrb"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1682"]
[BlackElo "1334"]
[ECO "C00"]
[ICCResult "White resigns"]
[Opening "French: advance, Paulsen attack"]
[NIC "FR.01"]
[Time "07:53:45"]
[TimeControl "3600+0"]

{ This is one of my best games, in that I beat a player rated
over 1700, whilst being rated myself at under 1300. I've
played NESYAKA before a few months back in Jan 2004 and
lost, and again after this I played him again, and lost. }

1. e4 e6

{ My old favourite the French Defence. }

2. e5

{ I was a bit puzzled by this.

MH: Me too. }

2...c5

{ With hindsignt I think d5 would have been better, as it
kept a pawn in the centre. Should white have played 3. exd6
(en-passant), then 3....cxd6 would have let me two pawns
in the centre.

MH: I think 2...d6 to get rid of pawn e5, once and for all,
is equal for Black already. }

3. c3

{ He seems to be making a lot of pawn moves.

MH: I'd guess he thinks he should support pawn e5
with d2-d4. But, 3. Nf3 is probably better, leaving
c3 for Nb1-c3. }

3...Nc6

{ Seems sensible, to attack his e-pawn. }

4. d4

{ White attacks the centre.

MH: You can't 'attack the centre'. You can
control central squares or occupy them or you
can attack the enemy's centrally placed pieces
(his center, you might say). }

4...d5

{ This seemed okay, as it gives me more control
of the centre. Had white play 5. exd5 (or is is
exd6 ??, capturing en-passant), 5...Bxd6 would
have got my bishop developed, whilst recapturing.

MH: You transposed to a "normal" French Defense
position. A good alternative is:
4...cxd4 5. cxd4 d6 }

5. Nf3

{ Can't see it does much other than develop a piece,
which is important of course, so its a good move.

MH: It prepares O-O, supports central pawns and
makes ready for the fight. What more could one
ask of a move? }

5...cxd4

{ Tries to get more of the centre.

MH: This is considered premature because it helps
White clear c3 and that enables Nb1-c3. More pressure
can be applied by 5...Qb6. }

6. cxd4

{ But easily refused by white. }

6...Bb4+

{ About the only sensible square to develop the
bishop, with the possible exception of e2.

MH: e2 is in White's possession. You probably
mean e7. }

7. Nc3

{ Develops the knight into a pinned position, but
gets out of check. Other alternatives might have
been Bd2. Not sure what was the best, but I think
just possibly this move. }

7...Nge7

{ Develops, leaving room to castle. }

8. Bb5

{ Develops the bishop, whilst leaving room to castle
and pinning blacks knight.

MH: Ideally White should like Bf1-d3 to take aim
at pawn h7, expecting Black to move ...O-O before
long. }

8...Qb6!

{ Attack on the bishop, which is pinning my knight.
Although the bishop is 'defended by the knight on c3,
that is itself pinned too.

Another option was to play 8...0-0, which would have
unpinned the knight, but not attacked a piece. }

9. Bxc6+

{ White swaps a bishop for a knight, so ridding himself of
the attack.

MH: Black is doing very well now. }

9...bxc6

{ I recaptured with the pawn. The other option was with
the knight (9...Nxc6), but on the whole f5 is a good
place for black's knight, and staying where it is,
makes it easy to get back there.

MH: I like ...bxc6 because it makes possible ...Ba6.
But, it really needs to be followed-up with ...c6-c5xd4
to open the c-file for another Black rook. }

10. O-O

{ White's knight is no longer pinned, and his king made
safer. }

10...Ba6

{ Decent move, developing the bishop to a good square,
where it immediatly threatens the white rook on f1.
Of course, it does not present white any real problems,
as the rook is easily moved to the e-file. }

11. Re1

{ Virtually forced.

MH: Completely forced. }

11...Nf5

{ Don't know quite what my plan was here. I guess
it is more centralised, although not presenting
an immediate danger. }

12. a3

{ White's knight was pinned against the rook, which
could not be moved to any other square. His other
option which was 12. Bd2, would have left the b2
pawn attacked if black moved his bishop anywhere.
Hence white chases off the bishop. }

12...Bxc3

{ I'm rather surprised white did this - swapping
his knight for black's bishop. }

13. bxc3

{ Virtually forced.

MH: Completely forced. }

13...O-O

{ Not in any immediate danger, so perhaps a bit
premature.

MH: If you had seen the idea of a3-a4, Bc1-a3 then
...c6-c5 to fight on dark squares would be great.
After ...O-O ...c5 becomes tactically bad. }

14. a4

{ Seems odd. I would have thought 14 Bg5 would be
more sensible, as it would connect the rook and queen
on the first rank, whilst perhaps inducing black to
advance the h-pawn, weaking his castled position -
although I only do that if really necessary. }

14...Rfb8

{ Black has siezed the open b-file with his queen
and rook.

MH: Probably better is to use ...Ra8-b8 and ...Rf8-c8
or ...Ra8-b8-b7, ...Rf8-b8. }

15. Ba3

{ White connects the rook and queen by moving his
bishop to a3. This is probably better than the g5
I thought earlier. }

15...Bc4

{ I don't recall what I was thinking here, but the
bishop controls all the diagonal it did before a6
to f1, but in addition the b3 and a2 squares. So the
bishop could be said to be in a better position.

MH: The bishop move is kind of vague and not terribly
productive. More to the point is to invade on the b-file
by 15...Qb3, threatening pawns a4 & c3, probably forcing
16. Qxb3 Rxb3, threatening pawn c3 and gaining time for
...Ra8-b8 to completely own the b-file. }

16. Bc5

{ Not really sure of the best square to move the queen
to. The b file could be dodgy }

16...Qa5

{ This attacks the c3 pawn, so gives white something
to do. He can't just ignore it. }

17. Bb4

{ Seems quite an obvious move.
The queen is being attacked several times now. It
can't seem to avoid this unless it moves to an inactive
part of the board. I did not want to do that.
However, that said, this activity is all on the queens
side, and perhaps the queen should have been moved
over to the other side of the board, where it could
threaten the king.

MH: I see no way for Black to break through after a4-a5
(which prevents ...a7-a5 kicking Bb4 off the b-file).
The fight is on the q-side, so stay there. }

17...Qa6

{ Again the queen moves. }

18. Nd2

{ Not sure this achieved much. What was white's aim
with this???

MH: 18. Qd2 seems safer. After the game move White
might lose a pawn after ...Nxd4 when pawn c3 is
overworked defending both pawn d4 and Bb4. }

18...Rb6

{ I'm trying to connect my rooks to attack the b-file }

19. f4

{ Not sure what white had in mind. }

19...Nxd4!

{ This wins a pawn, as 20. cxd4 will be followed by
20...Rxb4. }

20. Bc5

{ I thought I was in a mess here, as 20 Bc5 looked
like it had saved the pawn, and would win a knight.
But then then a good reply was noticed .... }

20...Nb3

{ Now it would appear the pawn is secure, as 21 Rxb4,
could be followed by Rxa1. I did not see up to this
position when playing 19...Nxd4. Still, it worked out
okay. }

21. Ra3??

{ Clearly now the Black knight on b3 is attacked twice,
and the rook on b6. Thankfully, that is easy to get
around .... }

21...Nxc5

{ This wins a bishop for black, putting me 4 points up,
and should be in a good position to win, although this
opponent's ICC rating is much better than mine, so I need
to be careful.

MH: Game over. White should resign! }

22. a5

{ Not really an attack on the rook as it might
appear, as the pawn is pinned. }

22...Rb2

{ Not sure if I realised the pawn was pinned in the
match, but moving the rook to the 7th rank is often
a good idea, although its not obvious there is anything
to pick up here.

MH: You mean something other than Kg1 or swapping off
everything to win a simple ending? }

23. Nxc4

{ Seems an odd move for white considering he is down
in material. One would not normally expect such an
opponent to swap pieces of equal value, as this will
do. (Well, assuming you consider a knight and bishop
equal). }

23...Qxc4 24. Qd4

{ Again, seems a bit silly, to offer a swap of queens. }

24...Qxd4+

{ Since I was 4 points up in material, a queen swap
seemed a good idea. }

25. cxd4

{ Virtually forced. }

25...Rb3

{ My knight on c5 is attacked, but this move
gives white the option of swapping rooks. Again,
since I'm up, I would like to do that.

MH: Don't go trading off your active piece.
25...Ne4 or ...Nb3 is better. }

26. Raa1

{ Black is not so stupid. }

26...Nd3

{ Attacks a backward pawn on f4. }

27. Re3

{ This move pins my knight on d3, so I can't
take the backward pawn on f4. }

27...Rab8

{ Now the knight is no longer pinned, so the
white pawn on f4 is again under attack }

28. Rd1??

{ Seems a blunder, as now the pawn on f4 can be safely
taken. }

28...Nxf4

{ Now black is 5 points ahead after the capture of
the white f4 pawn. }

29. Rxb3

{ Why did white swap rooks ? }

29...Rxb3

{ The white rook is obviously recaptured here.
White is now 5 points down, and seems in an
impossible situation. }

30. g3

{ Knight attacked, but it is hardly a threat.
White has a backward pawn at d4 I'd like to capture,
as this would give me a passed pawn. However, it's
not easy to see exactly how to achive this, although
with the 5 point material advantage, it should be
possible. }

30...Ne2+ 31. Kf1

{ Naturally white attacks the knight, and there is
no obvious brilliant response, although black should
win now. }

31...Nc3

{ If the black rook can be moved off the d-file,
there is some hope of getting the pawn at d4. This
attack achieves that. }

32. Rc1

{ rook moves, but there is no easy way for black yet. }

32...Ra3

{ Attack white's a pawn. Now this looks promising,
as I can's see how it can be effectively defended.

MH: Give your king some air by ...h5 or ...h6, then
you can sort out the piece play without any dangers. }

33. Kg2

{ I'm not sure what black feared. I was more
interested in the pawn that his king for now. }

33...Kf8

{ I'm fearing a back rank mate at some point, so
decide to take action to avoid that possibilty.
I don't want to mount an attack, only to realise
I have to stop it because I can be mated on the
back rank. }

34. Rc2??

{ White resigns

MH: 34...Ra2 simplifies nicely! }

0-1


Black played better than White, though it appears
your over-wordiness in commenting on the game indicates
you're thinking about one piece at a time or very small
tactical events of the game.

You need to see a larger idea of how to play your pieces
and to express that idea simply and clearly, then it will
be easier for you to find your way through any number
of variations, on your way to implementing/executing your
idea, without so much confusion.

Like most people you definately need to use your imagination
more; to see variations and to imagine how you or your
opponent might carry-out a plan.


  #6   Report Post  
Old April 12th 04, 07:19 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please check my analysis.

On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 14:38:40 -0400, "mdamien"
wrote:

"Dr. David Kirkby" m wrote
in message om...
I played a game against someone the other day on ICC and won. Given he
was some 400 points higher, I was quite pleased with that.

I've annotated the game myself and would appreciate any comments by
others.


[Event "ICC 60 0"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2004.04.07"]
[Round "-"]
[White "NESKAYA"]
[Black "g8wrb"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1682"]
[BlackElo "1334"]
[ECO "C00"]
[ICCResult "White resigns"]
[Opening "French: advance, Paulsen attack"]
[NIC "FR.01"]
[Time "07:53:45"]
[TimeControl "3600+0"]

{This is one of my best games, in that I beat a player rated over
1700, whilst
being rated myself at under 1300. I've played NESYAKA before a few
months back
in Jan 2004 and lost, and again after this I played him again, and
lost. }
1.e4 e6 {My old favourite the French Defence. } 2.e5 {I was a bit
puzzled by
this. } 2...c5 {With hindsignt I think d5 would have been better, as
it kept a
pawn in the centre. Should white have played 3. exd6 (en-passant),
then
3....cxd6 would have let me two pawns in the centre. }


If we are to assume that 2. d4 is more accurate than 2. e5, then your move
2. ... c5 would seem the more accurate way to exploit this, since upon 2.
... d5, White can play 3. d4 transposing to the Advance Variation.


3.c3 {He seems
to be
making a lot of pawn moves. }


With the point, though, to preserve a center pawn.

3...Nc6 {Seems sensible, to attack his
e-pawn. }
4.d4 {White attacks the centre. } 4...d5 {This seemed okay, as it
gives me more
control of the centre. Had white play 5. exd5 (or is is exd6 ??,
capturing
en-passant), 5...Bxd6 would have got my bishop developed, whilst
recapturing. }


If White plays 5. exd6 e.p., he's left with a weak isolated queen's pawn
after 5. ... cxd4.


5.Nf3 {Can't see it does much other than develop a piece, which is
important of
course, so its a good move. }


This is absolutely the correct move. All the action right now is focused on
d4. Now, the game has transposed into a standard Advance Variation.

5...cxd4 {Tries to get more of the
centre. }


Usually here Black will increase the pressure with Qb6, Nge7 (aiming toward
f5, or in some cases g6) or the flexible Bd7.

6.
cxd4 {But easily refused by white. } 6...Bb4+ {About the only sensible
square
to develop the bishop, with the possible exception of e2.}


Perhaps, then, it would make more sense to develop something else -- 6. Qb6
or 6. Bd7 (preventing checks along the a4-e8 diagonal and freeing the file
for the rook) or 6. Nge7. After 6. ... Bb4+, you really had to expect 7. Bd2
and then either exchanging bishops or retreating to e7 anyway, each with
loss of tempo. 6. ... Be7 is a good spot for the bishop, but you usually
want to get the king's knight out first via the e7 square.

7.Nc3
{Develops the
knight into a pinned position, but gets out of check. Other
althernatives might
have been Bd2. Not sure what was the best, but I think just possibly
this move.


I would prefer 7. Bd2, but either move calls Black's previous into question.

} 7...Nge7 {Develops, leaving room to castle. }


Yes. Keep in mind, though, that it's often dangerous to castle too soon in
this variation.

8.Bb5 {Develops the
bishop,
whilst leaving room to castle and pinning blacks knight. }


This move is almost always a mistake in the French Advance Variation. White
either wastes time (having to back the bishop up) or has to make an
unfavorable trade. 8. Bd3 or 8. Bd2 would have been fine.

8...Qb6!
{Attack on
the bishop, which is pinning my knight. Although the bishop is
'defended by the
knight on c3, that is itself pinned too.

Another option was to play 8...0-0, which would have unpinned the
knight, but
not attacked a piece.


Qb6 is a thematic move in this variation.


} 9.Bxc6+ {White swaps a bishop for a knight, so ridding himself of
the attack.


At this point, it would have been better to just concede the mistake and
play 9. Bd3. Black can't try to win the pawn at d4 because White would have
a discovered attack on the d4 square, with a check to back to b5. This
little "trick" is one of the reasons for an early Bd7 by Black.


} 9...bxc6 {I recaptured with the pawn. The other option was with the
knight
(9...Nxc6), but on the whole f6 is a good place for black's knight,
and staying
where it is, makes it easy to get back there. }


This was a tough choice. I think I would have taken with the knight so as to
play against a backward pawn in the semi-open c file (after Bxc3). Weakening
e5 has its merits too, though.

I guess you mean f5 with the knight. I'm not sure about that reasoning for
selected 9. ... bxc6, since the knight at c6 is bearing down on d4 as well,
and can't be driven away by g4. The square g6 is also a nice place for the
knight, and that would be in keeping with a plan of weakening e5 (that is,
after the pawn captures bxc6 and then pushes to c5).

10.O-O {White's knight
is no
longer pinned, and his king made safer. } 10...Ba6 {Decent move,
developing the
bishop to a good square, where it immediatly threatens the white rook
on f1. Of
cours, it does not present white any real problems, as the rook is
easily moved
to the e-file. }


Yes, but you have an active bishop, courtesy of White's plan of throwing his
own king's bishop away.

11.Re1 {Virtually forced. } 11...Nf5 {Don't know
quite what my
plan was here. I guess it is more centralised, although not presenting
an
immediate danger. }


In that case, O-O might have been a better idea.

12.a3 {White's knight was pinned against the rook,
which
could not be moved to any other square. His other option which was 12.
Bd2,
would have left the b2 pawn attacked if black moved his bishop
anywhere. Hence
white chases off the bishop. }


12. a3, as played, was the logical move. With the c file closed (Black's
choice on move 9), the backward c pawn won't be a significant problem, and
now Black's queen can come under attack in an open b file, gaining time to
secure it.

12...Bxc3 {I'm rather surprised white
did this -
swapping his knight for black's bishop. }


Why wouldn't White force this? He takes away Black's bishop pair. Note also
that this is Black's "good" bishop in relation to his pawns.

13.bxc3 {Virtually forced. }

Not just virtually forced, but absolutely forced.

13...O-O
{Not in any immediate danger, so perhaps a bit premature. }


It was OK, and probably the best move.

14.a4
{Seems odd. I
would have thought 14 Bg5 would be more sensible, as it would connect
the rook
and queen on the first rank, whilst perhaps inducing black to advance
the
h-pawn, weaking his castled position - although I only do that if
really
necessary. }


The idea behind a4 is to play Ba3, for the reasons you mention, but posting
the bishop on the strong a3-f8 diagonal.


Another possibility was 14.Bg5 so that the e7 square ia attacked
intending to follow up with 15.g4. If Black plays h6 then 15.g4 and
regardless of how Black allows the exchange (15...hxg5 16.gxf5 or
15...Nxd4 16.cxd4 hxg5 17.Nxg5) White has some compensation for his
weakness queenside in that he has lines to attack on the king-side.
If Black plays 15....Qc7 guarding the e7-square then White can play
16.Nh4 and remove Black's strongly posted knight.

14...Rfb8 {Black has siezed the open b-file with his
queen and
rook. }


I think the word "siezed" is a bit strong here, since White has been
planning to contest it. Black can force some massive exchanges, though, and
with best play the game would probably be drawn.

15.Ba3 {White connects the rook and queen by moving his bishop
to a3.
This is probably better than the g5 I thought earlier. } 15...Bc4 {I
con't
recall what I was thinking here, but the bishop controls all the
diagonal id
did before a6 to f1, but in addition the b3 and a2 squares. So the
bishop could
be said to be in a better position. }


It's reasonable, planning to meet Rb1 with 16. ... Bb3 or 16. ... Qa6 and
keeping the heavy pieces on the board. Simplifying with Qb3 was also worth
considering.

16.Bc5 {Not really sure of the
best
square to move the queen to. The b file could be dodgy}


White could also have played a5, or Nd2.

16...Qa5 {This
attacks
the c3 pawn, so gives white something to do. He can't just ignore it.
}


Sure, why not?

17.Bb4
{Seems quite an obvious move.

The queen is being attacked several times now. It can't seem to avoid
this
unless it moves to an inactive part of the board. I did not want to do
that.
However, that said, this activity is all on the queens side, and
perhaps the
queen should have been moved over to the other side of the board,
where it
could threaten the king. }


17. Qc2 was also reasonable.

17...Qa6 {Agan the queen moves. } 18.Nd2
{Not sure
this achieved much.

What was white's aim with this???}


It was a blunder. Now Black can play 18. ... Nxd4 and if 19. cxd4, 20. Rxb4.
White's idea, though, was presumably to trade a knight for a bishop, or to
try and maneuver around to c5, but these ideas were more practical at move
16.

18...Rb6 {I'm trying to connect my
rooks to
attack the b-file} 19.f4 {Not sure what white had in mind. }


OK, apparently his idea at move 19 was to free up the pawn and the d1-h5
diagonal for a kingside attack. This is a dubious plan.


19...Nxd4! {This
wins a pawn, as 20. cxd4 will be followed by 20...Rxb4. }


Yes, nice move. Now White is in a world of hurt.

20.Bc5 {I
thought I
was in a mess here, as 20 Bc5 looked like it had saved the pawn, and
would win
a knight. But then then a good reply was noticed ....} 20...Nb3 {Now
it would
appear the pawn is secure, as 21 Rxb4, could be followed by Rxa1. I
did not see
up to this position when playing 19...Nxd4. Still, it worked out okay.
}


20. ... Ne2+ would have been straightforward enough. Your move is good too,
though, because White is in check after 21. Bxb6 Qxb6+.


20...Ne2+ is clearly the best move. After 21.Kh1 (21.Kf2 Nxf4 winning
another pawn and becuase of the threat of Nd3+ either winning the
exchange back or not losing it because Black has time to retreat the
Rb6) Rb2 and then either 22.Ba3 Rb7 23.Nxc4 Nxc3 24.Qd3 Qxc4 25.Qxc4
dxc4 26.Rec1 Rb3 where Black will eventually end up with a strong if
not winning) advanatge: a pawn plus (and a passed c-pawn to boot) in
a B+R vs. B+N ending. The other way White can play: 22.Be3 {to defend
f4} Bd3 {to make sure White cannot exchange the extra defender of the
Ne2} 24.Ra3 Rab8 leaves Blackwith his pawn plus and White is so tied
up he will have difficulty in staying just a pawn down.

The problem with 20...Nb3 is that it allows white to get to a postion
with much more counterplay: 20...Nb3 21.Bxb6 Qxb6+ 22.Kh1 Nxa1
23.Nxc4 dxc4 24.Qxa1. Black has an extra pawn, but that extra pawn is
one of the doubled isolated pawns on the c-file. This is still won
for Black, but the d-file is open and there are several ways that
White can penetrate with his queen or rook to harrass Black's king.

21.Ra3
{Clearly now the Black knight on b3 is attacked twice, and the rook on
b6.
Thankfully, that is easy to get around ....}


Yes, throwing a piece away is not helping White's cause.

21...Nxc5 {This wins a
bishop for
black, putting me 4 points up, and should be in a good position to
win, although
this opponent's ICC rating is much better than mine, so I need to be
careful.


It's always a good idea to be careful. I'll end my comments here. Well
played! I would not say that White displayed a rating any higher than
Black's in this game.

Matt


} 22.a5 {Not really an attack on the rook as it might appear, as the
pawn is
pinned. } 22...Rb2 {Not sure if I realised the pawn was pinned in the
match,
but moving the rook to the 7th rank is often a good idea, although its
not
obvious there is anything to pick up here. } 23.Nxc4 {Seems an odd
move for
white considering he is down in material. One would not normally
expect such an
opponent to swap pieces of equal value, as this will do. (Well,
assuming you
consider a knight and bishop equal). } 23...Qxc4 24.Qd4 {Again, seems
a bit
silly, to offer a swap of queens. } 24...Qxd4+ {Since I was 4 points
up in
material, a queen swap seemed a good idea.} 25.cxd4 {Virtyally forced.
} 25...
Rb3 {My knight on c5 is attacked, but this move gives white the option
of
swapping rooks. Again, since I'm up, I would like to do that. }
26.Raa1 {Black
is not so stupid. } 26...Nd3 {Attacks a backward pawn on f4. } 27.Re3
{This
move pins my knight on d3, so I can't take the backward pawn on f4.}
27...Rab8
{Now the knight is no longer pinned, so the white pawn on f4 is again
under
attack} 28.Rd1?? {Seems a blunder, as now the pawn on f4 can be safely
taken. }
28...Nxf4 {Now black is 5 points ahead after the capture of the white
f4 pawn.
} 29.Rxb3 {Why did white swap rooks ? } 29...Rxb3 {The white rook is
obviously
recaptured here.

White is now 5 points down, and seems in an impossible situation. }
30.g3 {
Knight attacked, but it is hardly a threat. White has a backward pawn
at d5 I'd
like to capture, as this would give me a passed pawn. However, its not
easy to
see exactly how to achive this, although with the 5 point material
advantage,
it should be possible. } 30...Ne2+ 31.Kf1 {Naturally white attacks the
knight,
and there is no obvious brilliant response, although black should win
now. }
31...Nc3 {If the black rook can be moved off the d-file, there is some
hope of
getting the pawn at d4. This attack achieves that. } 32.Rc1 {rook
moves, but
there is no easy way for black yet. } 32...Ra3 {Attack white's a pawn.
Now this
looks promising, as I can's see how it can be effectively defended. }
33.Kg2 {
I'm not sure what black feared. I was more interested in the pawn that
his king
for now. } 33...Kf8 {I'm fearing a back rank mate at some point, so
decide to
take action to avoid that possibilty. I don't want to mount an attack,
only to
realise I have to stop it because I can be mated on the back rank. }
34.Rc2?? {
White resigns} 0-1




  #7   Report Post  
Old April 15th 04, 09:23 AM
johnno
 
Posts: n/a
Default Please check my analysis.


Just one comment, after 20... Nb3, White probably should have continued, 21
Bxb6 Qxb6
22 Kh1 Nxa1 23 Nxc4 dxc4 24 Qxa1 where he may have been able to hang on if
he was lucky. My suggestion is 20 ... Ne2+, if 21 Kh1 Rb2 22 Ba3 Rb7 23 Nxc4
Nxc3 24 Qc2 Qxc4 25 Rec1 which looks good for Black or 20 ... Ne2+, If 21
Kf2 Nxf4 22 Bxb6 Nd3+ 23 Kg3 Nxe1 24 Ba7 Nd3 25 Bd4 c5

Cheers
John
"Dr. David Kirkby" m wrote
in message om...
I played a game against someone the other day on ICC and won. Given he
was some 400 points higher, I was quite pleased with that.

I've annotated the game myself and would appreciate any comments by
others.


[Event "ICC 60 0"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2004.04.07"]
[Round "-"]
[White "NESKAYA"]
[Black "g8wrb"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1682"]
[BlackElo "1334"]
[ECO "C00"]
[ICCResult "White resigns"]
[Opening "French: advance, Paulsen attack"]
[NIC "FR.01"]
[Time "07:53:45"]
[TimeControl "3600+0"]

{This is one of my best games, in that I beat a player rated over
1700, whilst
being rated myself at under 1300. I've played NESYAKA before a few
months back
in Jan 2004 and lost, and again after this I played him again, and
lost. }
1.e4 e6 {My old favourite the French Defence. } 2.e5 {I was a bit
puzzled by
this. } 2...c5 {With hindsignt I think d5 would have been better, as
it kept a
pawn in the centre. Should white have played 3. exd6 (en-passant),
then
3....cxd6 would have let me two pawns in the centre. } 3.c3 {He seems
to be
making a lot of pawn moves. } 3...Nc6 {Seems sensible, to attack his
e-pawn. }
4.d4 {White attacks the centre. } 4...d5 {This seemed okay, as it
gives me more
control of the centre. Had white play 5. exd5 (or is is exd6 ??,
capturing
en-passant), 5...Bxd6 would have got my bishop developed, whilst
recapturing. }
5.Nf3 {Can't see it does much other than develop a piece, which is
important of
course, so its a good move. } 5...cxd4 {Tries to get more of the
centre. } 6.
cxd4 {But easily refused by white. } 6...Bb4+ {About the only sensible
square
to develop the bishop, with the possible exception of e2.} 7.Nc3
{Develops the
knight into a pinned position, but gets out of check. Other
althernatives might
have been Bd2. Not sure what was the best, but I think just possibly
this move.
} 7...Nge7 {Develops, leaving room to castle. } 8.Bb5 {Develops the
bishop,
whilst leaving room to castle and pinning blacks knight. } 8...Qb6!
{Attack on
the bishop, which is pinning my knight. Although the bishop is
'defended by the
knight on c3, that is itself pinned too.

Another option was to play 8...0-0, which would have unpinned the
knight, but
not attacked a piece.

} 9.Bxc6+ {White swaps a bishop for a knight, so ridding himself of
the attack.


} 9...bxc6 {I recaptured with the pawn. The other option was with the
knight
(9...Nxc6), but on the whole f6 is a good place for black's knight,
and staying
where it is, makes it easy to get back there. } 10.O-O {White's knight
is no
longer pinned, and his king made safer. } 10...Ba6 {Decent move,
developing the
bishop to a good square, where it immediatly threatens the white rook
on f1. Of
cours, it does not present white any real problems, as the rook is
easily moved
to the e-file. } 11.Re1 {Virtually forced. } 11...Nf5 {Don't know
quite what my
plan was here. I guess it is more centralised, although not presenting
an
immediate danger. } 12.a3 {White's knight was pinned against the rook,
which
could not be moved to any other square. His other option which was 12.
Bd2,
would have left the b2 pawn attacked if black moved his bishop
anywhere. Hence
white chases off the bishop. } 12...Bxc3 {I'm rather surprised white
did this -
swapping his knight for black's bishop. } 13.bxc3 {Virtually forced. }
13...O-O
{Not in any immediate danger, so perhaps a bit premature. } 14.a4
{Seems odd. I
would have thought 14 Bg5 would be more sensible, as it would connect
the rook
and queen on the first rank, whilst perhaps inducing black to advance
the
h-pawn, weaking his castled position - although I only do that if
really
necessary. } 14...Rfb8 {Black has siezed the open b-file with his
queen and
rook. } 15.Ba3 {White connects the rook and queen by moving his bishop
to a3.
This is probably better than the g5 I thought earlier. } 15...Bc4 {I
con't
recall what I was thinking here, but the bishop controls all the
diagonal id
did before a6 to f1, but in addition the b3 and a2 squares. So the
bishop could
be said to be in a better position. } 16.Bc5 {Not really sure of the
best
square to move the queen to. The b file could be dodgy} 16...Qa5 {This
attacks
the c3 pawn, so gives white something to do. He can't just ignore it.
} 17.Bb4
{Seems quite an obvious move.

The queen is being attacked several times now. It can't seem to avoid
this
unless it moves to an inactive part of the board. I did not want to do
that.
However, that said, this activity is all on the queens side, and
perhaps the
queen should have been moved over to the other side of the board,
where it
could threaten the king. } 17...Qa6 {Agan the queen moves. } 18.Nd2
{Not sure
this achieved much.

What was white's aim with this???} 18...Rb6 {I'm trying to connect my
rooks to
attack the b-file} 19.f4 {Not sure what white had in mind. }
19...Nxd4! {This
wins a pawn, as 20. cxd4 will be followed by 20...Rxb4. } 20.Bc5 {I
thought I
was in a mess here, as 20 Bc5 looked like it had saved the pawn, and
would win
a knight. But then then a good reply was noticed ....} 20...Nb3 {Now
it would
appear the pawn is secure, as 21 Rxb4, could be followed by Rxa1. I
did not see
up to this position when playing 19...Nxd4. Still, it worked out okay.
} 21.Ra3
{Clearly now the Black knight on b3 is attacked twice, and the rook on
b6.
Thankfully, that is easy to get around ....} 21...Nxc5 {This wins a
bishop for
black, putting me 4 points up, and should be in a good position to
win, although
this opponent's ICC rating is much better than mine, so I need to be
careful.

} 22.a5 {Not really an attack on the rook as it might appear, as the
pawn is
pinned. } 22...Rb2 {Not sure if I realised the pawn was pinned in the
match,
but moving the rook to the 7th rank is often a good idea, although its
not
obvious there is anything to pick up here. } 23.Nxc4 {Seems an odd
move for
white considering he is down in material. One would not normally
expect such an
opponent to swap pieces of equal value, as this will do. (Well,
assuming you
consider a knight and bishop equal). } 23...Qxc4 24.Qd4 {Again, seems
a bit
silly, to offer a swap of queens. } 24...Qxd4+ {Since I was 4 points
up in
material, a queen swap seemed a good idea.} 25.cxd4 {Virtyally forced.
} 25...
Rb3 {My knight on c5 is attacked, but this move gives white the option
of
swapping rooks. Again, since I'm up, I would like to do that. }
26.Raa1 {Black
is not so stupid. } 26...Nd3 {Attacks a backward pawn on f4. } 27.Re3
{This
move pins my knight on d3, so I can't take the backward pawn on f4.}
27...Rab8
{Now the knight is no longer pinned, so the white pawn on f4 is again
under
attack} 28.Rd1?? {Seems a blunder, as now the pawn on f4 can be safely
taken. }
28...Nxf4 {Now black is 5 points ahead after the capture of the white
f4 pawn.
} 29.Rxb3 {Why did white swap rooks ? } 29...Rxb3 {The white rook is
obviously
recaptured here.

White is now 5 points down, and seems in an impossible situation. }
30.g3 {
Knight attacked, but it is hardly a threat. White has a backward pawn
at d5 I'd
like to capture, as this would give me a passed pawn. However, its not
easy to
see exactly how to achive this, although with the 5 point material
advantage,
it should be possible. } 30...Ne2+ 31.Kf1 {Naturally white attacks the
knight,
and there is no obvious brilliant response, although black should win
now. }
31...Nc3 {If the black rook can be moved off the d-file, there is some
hope of
getting the pawn at d4. This attack achieves that. } 32.Rc1 {rook
moves, but
there is no easy way for black yet. } 32...Ra3 {Attack white's a pawn.
Now this
looks promising, as I can's see how it can be effectively defended. }
33.Kg2 {
I'm not sure what black feared. I was more interested in the pawn that
his king
for now. } 33...Kf8 {I'm fearing a back rank mate at some point, so
decide to
take action to avoid that possibilty. I don't want to mount an attack,
only to
realise I have to stop it because I can be mated on the back rank. }
34.Rc2?? {
White resigns} 0-1



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