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Old April 17th 04, 04:21 AM
Sam Sloan
 
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Default Basman and 1.g4

At 06:12 PM 4/16/2004 -0000, zomorodki wrote:


Having said that, like you, M. Basman made it to IM playing nothing
other than Grobs and Borgs.


Not true. I taught Basman how to play the Grob 1.g4. I stayed as a
guest at Basman's home south of London for two days in February 1978
while trying to put a call through to my one-true-love at the time,
Laura Markarian in Armenia. Basman is Armenian and agreed to
translate. http://www.samsloan.com/laura.htm

During the two days in Basman's house I showed him all my analysis of
1.g4 Basman had never seen it played before and thought it lost by
force. After two days I was able to convince him that the opening was
playable.

Basman was already an International Master. He never played the Grob
before I showed it to him. He started playing it the next year, in
1979. You can check that out.

However, Basman deserves full credit for inventing the Borg 1. e4 g5.
I would never have dreamed to play that. I have tried it a few times
since with very poor results.

Sam Sloan
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Old April 17th 04, 11:56 AM
Chess One
 
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Default Basman and 1.g4


"Sam Sloan" wrote in message
...
At 06:12 PM 4/16/2004 -0000, zomorodki wrote:


Having said that, like you, M. Basman made it to IM playing nothing
other than Grobs and Borgs.


Not true. I taught Basman how to play the Grob 1.g4. I stayed as a
guest at Basman's home south of London for two days in February 1978
while trying to put a call through to my one-true-love at the time,
Laura Markarian in Armenia. Basman is Armenian and agreed to
translate. http://www.samsloan.com/laura.htm

During the two days in Basman's house I showed him all my analysis of
1.g4 Basman had never seen it played before and thought it lost by
force. After two days I was able to convince him that the opening was
playable.

Basman was already an International Master. He never played the Grob
before I showed it to him. He started playing it the next year, in
1979. You can check that out.


However, Basman deserves full credit for inventing the Borg 1. e4 g5.
I would never have dreamed to play that. I have tried it a few times
since with very poor results.


Sam, thanks for the corrections - I thought he had played it earlier, and
should have checked since I have his book here somewhere. I find that 1...
g5 works better after 1.c4 perhaps because the critical square c3 cannot now
be occupied by a pawn. And I note Bas jokes in his book that it is now a
forced win for black. Did you base your own Grob on Bloodgood or anyone in
particular? BillWall? Or did you devise it as a mirrored Sokolski?

Cordially, Phil

Sam Sloan



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Old April 17th 04, 01:59 PM
Harold Buck
 
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Default Basman and 1.g4

In article ,
"Chess One" wrote:

During the two days in Basman's house I showed him all my analysis of
1.g4 Basman had never seen it played before and thought it lost by
force. After two days I was able to convince him that the opening was
playable.

Basman was already an International Master. He never played the Grob
before I showed it to him. He started playing it the next year, in
1979. You can check that out.


However, Basman deserves full credit for inventing the Borg 1. e4 g5.
I would never have dreamed to play that. I have tried it a few times
since with very poor results.



Make fun of this opening if you choose, but you will be assimilated.
Resistance is futile.

--Harold Buck


"I used to rock and roll all night,
and party every day.
Then it was every other day. . . ."
-Homer J. Simpson
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Old April 17th 04, 02:54 PM
Sam Sloan
 
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Default Basman and 1.g4

On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 10:56:19 GMT, "Chess One"
wrote:

Sam, thanks for the corrections - I thought he had played it earlier, and
should have checked since I have his book here somewhere. I find that 1...
g5 works better after 1.c4 perhaps because the critical square c3 cannot now
be occupied by a pawn. And I note Bas jokes in his book that it is now a
forced win for black. Did you base your own Grob on Bloodgood or anyone in
particular? BillWall? Or did you devise it as a mirrored Sokolski?

Cordially, Phil


I was interviewed in this question a few weeks ago. I started playing
1.g4 because of a book entitled "The Blue Book of Charts to Winning
Chess". This book was based on a database the author had compiled of
50,000 published games. For each move he gave white's winning
percentage. He found that with 1.e4 White won 59% of the time, with
1.d4 White won 58% with 1.b4 White won 49% and with 1.g4 White won 77%
!!!!

I decided that this seemed to be a valid idea and to test it. I played
1.g4 in every game in the 1976 World Open and sure enough I scored 75%
.. My only loss was to Danny Kopec who was rated 300 points higher than
me. I have played nothing else since.

All the lines I play were invented by me. The games in The Blue Book
of Charts to Winning Chess did help some. For example those games
showed that after 1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 c6 3. h3 e5 4. c4 White loses after
4. ... dxc4. Therefore, I have never played 4. c4 in that position.

It was not until many years later that I obtained the books by Grob
and Bloodgood. I found those books to be useless to me because their
opponents were all weak players. Most of the opponents were all Class
B and Class C players. Not one game was against a master in either
book. By that time, I had defeated many masters with 1.g4 and so the
books by Grob and Basman were useless to me.

I still have never seen Bill Wall's book but I am sure that it must be
much better.

Sam Sloan
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Old April 17th 04, 04:24 PM
Chess One
 
Posts: n/a
Default Basman and 1.g4

I was interviewed in this question a few weeks ago. I started playing
1.g4 because of a book entitled "The Blue Book of Charts to Winning
Chess". This book was based on a database the author had compiled of
50,000 published games. For each move he gave white's winning
percentage. He found that with 1.e4 White won 59% of the time, with
1.d4 White won 58% with 1.b4 White won 49% and with 1.g4 White won 77%
!!!!

I decided that this seemed to be a valid idea and to test it. I played
1.g4 in every game in the 1976 World Open and sure enough I scored 75%
. My only loss was to Danny Kopec who was rated 300 points higher than
me. I have played nothing else since.

All the lines I play were invented by me. The games in The Blue Book
of Charts to Winning Chess did help some. For example those games
showed that after 1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 c6 3. h3 e5 4. c4 White loses after
4. ... dxc4. Therefore, I have never played 4. c4 in that position.

It was not until many years later that I obtained the books by Grob
and Bloodgood. I found those books to be useless to me because their
opponents were all weak players. Most of the opponents were all Class
B and Class C players. Not one game was against a master in either
book. By that time, I had defeated many masters with 1.g4 and so the
books by Grob and Basman were useless to me.

I still have never seen Bill Wall's book but I am sure that it must be
much better.


I have it here in front of me. ISBN 0-931462-86-X

Bill gives the lines names, for example after your 1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 c6

He gives the main line as 3. c4, and
a) 3 g5 The Spike
b) 3 h3 The Short Spike
c) e4 [un-named]

and follows by illustrative openings by Grob-Bischoff, Grob-Spielraum,
Bloodgood- H. Evans, Grob-Denring, W Clark-K Jones, Grob - Silberring,
Bloodgood-Meyerhofer, Grob-Branner, Gron-Wild, Bloodgood-Lweis,
Fewell-Phillips, Grob-Roesler, Bloodgood-Lundy, Dubini - F. Larsen,
Dubini-Pannullo /just for those lines/; earliest dated game is 1958, latest
1981, from pages 64-66 of an 84 page booklet.

O! I note that I have stolen this book from The Reverend Philip Gustafson
It was Published by Chess Enterprises in 1988
Coraopolis, PA.
Publisher is B.G. Dudley
Copyright 1988

The games index offers a few 'names' like Basman-Keene, and Basman-Miles,
Duckworth-McCambridge, Koltanowski-Love, but is not complete, and looking at
the games themselves there is also Basman-Botterill, a number of Indian
players, and Krnic-Ermenkov, Graz 1982, for example.

I think this is as good or a better book than Basman's for game scores, but
has much less commentary and annotation - but why don't you write a more
comprehensive one?

Bill Wall incidentally makes his Acknowledgements to: Ray Alexis, Frank
Cunliffe and Bob Dudley for material contributions, and to Geoffrey
McCauliffe and Val Zemitis for other assistance. Perhaps you will have
encountered some of these folks?

Bill uses as reference, Basman, J. Benjamin & E. Schiller, Bloodgood, Dubini
R. ("1.g4" L'Arcimatto, 12/81 & 2/82), Euwe, M (Grob-Flankenspiel), Ganzo
J., Grob, Harding (Dallas), Matanovic, Welling G (Grob's Attack In Practice,
1981)

Cordially, Phil

Sam Sloan





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Old April 17th 04, 06:58 PM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Basman and 1.g4

On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 15:24:05 GMT, "Chess One"
wrote:

I was interviewed in this question a few weeks ago. I started playing
1.g4 because of a book entitled "The Blue Book of Charts to Winning
Chess". This book was based on a database the author had compiled of
50,000 published games. For each move he gave white's winning
percentage. He found that with 1.e4 White won 59% of the time, with
1.d4 White won 58% with 1.b4 White won 49% and with 1.g4 White won 77%
!!!!

I decided that this seemed to be a valid idea and to test it. I played
1.g4 in every game in the 1976 World Open and sure enough I scored 75%
. My only loss was to Danny Kopec who was rated 300 points higher than
me. I have played nothing else since.

All the lines I play were invented by me. The games in The Blue Book
of Charts to Winning Chess did help some. For example those games
showed that after 1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 c6 3. h3 e5 4. c4 White loses after
4. ... dxc4. Therefore, I have never played 4. c4 in that position.

It was not until many years later that I obtained the books by Grob
and Bloodgood. I found those books to be useless to me because their
opponents were all weak players. Most of the opponents were all Class
B and Class C players. Not one game was against a master in either
book. By that time, I had defeated many masters with 1.g4 and so the
books by Grob and Basman were useless to me.

I still have never seen Bill Wall's book but I am sure that it must be
much better.


I have it here in front of me. ISBN 0-931462-86-X

Bill gives the lines names, for example after your 1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 c6

He gives the main line as 3. c4, and
a) 3 g5 The Spike
b) 3 h3 The Short Spike
c) e4 [un-named]


Thank you very much. I play 3. h3, which he calls the Short Spike. I
have never played 3. g5 as I do not see a good reply to 3. .... h6
following which Black opens his rook file. I also never play 3. c4 as
that is followed by 3. .... dxc4 with no compensation. Actually, I
played 3. c4 by mistake once because I fell asleep and mixed up the
lines. I got a very bad position but won anyway due to weak play by
opponent.

Sam Sloan
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Old April 18th 04, 12:33 AM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Basman and 1.g4

At 10:27 PM 4/17/2004 -0000, chessparrott wrote:
I don't have the games in handy format but the first was played on
25th May 1979 in Basingstoke, Hampshire, where coincidentally I now
live, right in the college that I work in today.

His 1. g4 win over Nunn is in The Killer Grob (Pergamon Press).

The MOB you need is #12. Hugh may still have it for sale.


Thank you very much. That confirms my recollection that Basman started
playing 1.g4 about one year after I first showed my analysis to him.

At the same time, Basman plays it differently than I do. My system is
more aggressive than his.

Sam Sloan
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Old April 19th 04, 07:46 PM
michael adams
 
Posts: n/a
Default Basman and 1.g4

Sam Sloan wrote:

nip

It was not until many years later that I obtained the books by Grob
and Bloodgood. I found those books to be useless to me because their
opponents were all weak players. Most of the opponents were all Class
B and Class C players. Not one game was against a master in either
book. By that time, I had defeated many masters with 1.g4 and so the
books by Grob and Basman were useless to me.

I still have never seen Bill Wall's book but I am sure that it must be
much better.


....

Ah yes! The Definitive Grob by S. Sloan - a 'must' for my xmas
stocking..

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