Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old April 29th 04, 11:14 PM
TruthXayer
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis needed(A20/21)...English opening game

Hi All,
Recently I was black and was faced with the English
opening. The game went into unchartered territories
pretty soon and hence I am looking for some
insights(mainly for black ideas to the English and
also inputs to how i handled the game). I have entered
my mini-analysis of the game too for my thoughts
during the game.


[Date "2004.04.28"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Alan"]
[Black "TruthX"]
[Result "0-1"]
[BlackElo "1876"]
[ECO "A21/20"]
[Opening "English Opening"]
[WhiteElo "1829"]


1.c4 g6 2.g3 Bg7 3.Bg2 e5 4.Nc3 Ne7 5.Nf3 d6!? {should
probably develop a piece instead like Nc6.} 6.O-O O-O
7.d3 f5!? {is this premature? have seen some english
games with this structure for black and got good
play...} 8.Qc2 Nbc6 9.a3? {looks like a
weak move Nb4 not really a serious threat, looked like
a reactive move here by opponent} f4 10.b4 Nf5
{strongpointing outpost at d4} 11.b5!? {e3 was the
move i expected and was still thinking about it, when
opponent played this} Ncd4 12.Nxd4 Nxd4
13.Qd1 Rb8 14.e3 f3! {had a long think about fxg3 and
fxe3 lines, but this seemed best from a stand point
with an e4 trap following} 15.Bh1 {only move, bishop
for knight exchange just bad for white} Ne6! {makking
room for e4 and also knight can jump to c5/g5}
16.Bxf3? e4! 17.Bxe4 Bxc3 18.Rb1 Ng5 19.Bg2 Bh3? {Nh3
was just won according to my engine, but i am playing
fast now sensing a win} 20.d4 Bxg2 21.Kxg2 d5!?
{immediate Qf6 was probably better/faster} 22.Qb3 Qf6
23.f4 Qf5 24.Bb2 Qe4+ 25.Kf2 Qf3+
26.Kg1 Nh3# {White checkmated} {Mate} 0-1
  #2   Report Post  
Old April 30th 04, 09:00 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis needed(A20/21)...English opening game

On 29 Apr 2004 15:14:52 -0700, (TruthXayer)
wrote:

Hi All,
Recently I was black and was faced with the English
opening. The game went into unchartered territories
pretty soon and hence I am looking for some
insights(mainly for black ideas to the English and
also inputs to how i handled the game). I have entered
my mini-analysis of the game too for my thoughts
during the game.


[Date "2004.04.28"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Alan"]
[Black "TruthX"]
[Result "0-1"]
[BlackElo "1876"]
[ECO "A21/20"]
[Opening "English Opening"]
[WhiteElo "1829"]


1.c4 g6 2.g3 Bg7 3.Bg2 e5


A common way for Black to combat the english is to play a reversed
Closed Sicilian, which is essentially what you did.

I play 1.e4 as White and when black plays 1...c5 I go for the closed
variations of the sicilain. Since I understand White's basic plans
here I play black against the English I go for a similar pawn
structure; a recent game I played as black went 1.c4 d6 2.g3 e5 3.Bg2
f5.

In such a reversed Closed Sicilian, black will be attacking on the
king side and white will be attacking on the queenside. This makes
White's later moves of a3, b4 easier to understand.

4.Nc3 Ne7


In the position with colors reversed White haas two popular ways of
proceeding:
a) develop the bishop to e3 and queen to d2 with the potential of
playing Bh6 at a convenient moment. in these lines White often devels
the king's knight to e7. In some variations it moves to g3 after a
further advance of the g-pawn.
b) play f4 with the idea of eventually playing f5. In most of these
lines White plays the knight to f3.

Since you later played ...f5, I would prefer playing it here and
developing the knight to f6 on the next move.

5.Nf3 d6!? {should
probably develop a piece instead like Nc6.} 6.O-O O-O
7.d3 f5!? {is this premature? have seen some english
games with this structure for black and got good
play...} 8.Qc2


This is actually White's first mistake (not 9.a3). In fact two moves
come to mind for White he either 8.a3 or 8.Rb1 and following up
with Bd2 and b4.

Nbc6 9.a3? {looks like a
weak move Nb4 not really a serious threat, looked like
a reactive move here by opponent} f4 10.b4 Nf5
{strongpointing outpost at d4} 11.b5!? {e3 was the
move i expected and was still thinking about it, when
opponent played this}


Actually 11.b5 is a minor mistake. White must play e3 to prevent
Black from planting a knight at d4. After 11.e3 fxe3 [Not 11...g5
12.b5! and black must play 12...Nb8 or lose a pawn. After 12...Nb8
13.exf4 exf4 14.g4 Nd4 15.Nxd4 Bxd4 16.Bd5+ Kg7 17.Bb2 and White is
slight better due to better development and having blunted Black's
kingside intiative, while his queenside pressure is still going
strong.]12.dxe3 we have a position in which White's queenside
initiative is balanced by Black's on the kingside.

Ncd4 12.Nxd4 Nxd4
13.Qd1 Rb8 14.e3


A little better would be Rb1 either here at move 16 to get the rook
off the diagonal. Followup ideas for White would be Bb2 to completely
nullify Black's ...e4 threat. By the way a threat of ...e4 is a
prevalent theme in positions form this opening where White has played
b4.

f3! {had a long think about fxg3 and
fxe3 lines, but this seemed best from a stand point
with an e4 trap following} 15.Bh1 {only move, bishop
for knight exchange just bad for white} Ne6! {makking
room for e4 and also knight can jump to c5/g5}
16.Bxf3?


This move starts the real decline in White's position. After 16.Rb1
Ng5 17.Re1 we get to a position that is rather cramped for White on
the king isde, but in which Black has difficulty attacking there as
well. This position is approximately equal.

e4! 17.Bxe4 Bxc3 18.Rb1 Ng5 19.Bg2


White could have reduceed some Black's advantage by playing 19.Bd5+
followed by 20.f4 but he will still be down a piece for two pawns.

Bh3? {Nh3
was just won according to my engine, but i am playing
fast now sensing a win}


The reason that 19...Nh3+ wins is that you win the exchange by force:
19...Nh3 20.Bxh3 [20.Kh1 Nxf2+ is even worse] Bxh3 and Black can
trade obe of his bushops for the rook currently at f1. That would give
black material advantage of a rook for two pawns. Black's subsequent
plan should be to create open files for the rooks to perate on.

20.d4


20.f4 was better it being more important to drive away the knight than
to try to capture the bishop at c3. However, Black would still have a
large advantage.

Bxg2 21.Kxg2 d5!?
{immediate Qf6 was probably better/faster} 22.Qb3 Qf6
23.f4 Qf5 24.Bb2 Qe4+ 25.Kf2 Qf3+
26.Kg1 Nh3# {White checkmated} {Mate} 0-1


I realized here that most of my annotations are suggesting better
moves for White. This is because if White had played more accurately
he could have blunted your king-side initiative/attack and then
carried out operations on the queen-side giving him a slight
advantage. As White did play the game he gave Black a decisive
advantage by move 17.

If you want to understand these positions better you may want to look
at an opening book on the Closed Sicilian. There is a fairly good one:
"The Ultimate Closed Sicilian" by Gary Lane. Also John Donaladson's
book "A Strategic Opening Repertoire" has some discussion of this
opening from White's point of view. Lastly the book "Beating the
Flank Openings" (I forget the name of the author) offers some good
advice for black in playing against the English (as well as other
hypermodern openings).

Mike Ogush
USCF 1961
  #3   Report Post  
Old May 1st 04, 08:07 AM
Cyrill Oseledets
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis needed(A20/21)...English opening game

(Mike Ogush) wrote in message ...
On 29 Apr 2004 15:14:52 -0700,
(TruthXayer)
wrote:

Hi All,
Recently I was black and was faced with the English
opening. The game went into unchartered territories
pretty soon and hence I am looking for some
insights(mainly for black ideas to the English and
also inputs to how i handled the game). I have entered
my mini-analysis of the game too for my thoughts
during the game.


[Date "2004.04.28"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Alan"]
[Black "TruthX"]
[Result "0-1"]
[BlackElo "1876"]
[ECO "A21/20"]
[Opening "English Opening"]
[WhiteElo "1829"]


1.c4 g6 2.g3 Bg7 3.Bg2 e5


A common way for Black to combat the english is to play a reversed
Closed Sicilian, which is essentially what you did.

I play 1.e4 as White and when black plays 1...c5 I go for the closed
variations of the sicilain. Since I understand White's basic plans
here I play black against the English I go for a similar pawn
structure; a recent game I played as black went 1.c4 d6 2.g3 e5 3.Bg2
f5.

In such a reversed Closed Sicilian, black will be attacking on the
king side and white will be attacking on the queenside. This makes
White's later moves of a3, b4 easier to understand.

4.Nc3 Ne7


In the position with colors reversed White haas two popular ways of
proceeding:
a) develop the bishop to e3 and queen to d2 with the potential of
playing Bh6 at a convenient moment. in these lines White often devels
the king's knight to e7. In some variations it moves to g3 after a
further advance of the g-pawn.
b) play f4 with the idea of eventually playing f5. In most of these
lines White plays the knight to f3.

Since you later played ...f5, I would prefer playing it here and
developing the knight to f6 on the next move.

5.Nf3 d6!? {should
probably develop a piece instead like Nc6.} 6.O-O O-O
7.d3 f5!? {is this premature? have seen some english
games with this structure for black and got good
play...} 8.Qc2


This is actually White's first mistake (not 9.a3). In fact two moves
come to mind for White he either 8.a3 or 8.Rb1 and following up
with Bd2 and b4.


8.Qc2 is a standart move here. Was played for example Andersson -
Polugaevsky (Palma de Majorca 1972)

Nbc6 9.a3? {looks like a
weak move Nb4 not really a serious threat, looked like
a reactive move here by opponent} f4 10.b4 Nf5
{strongpointing outpost at d4} 11.b5!? {e3 was the
move i expected and was still thinking about it, when
opponent played this}



I would prefer 10... Bg4 to begin struggle for xd4

Actually 11.b5 is a minor mistake. White must play e3 to prevent
Black from planting a knight at d4.


Yes, exactly. Thats wy Bg4 seems more precise to me. If 10...Bg4 11.e3
e4!?
12.dxe4 Bxf3 13.Bxf3 fxe3 14.fxe3 (forced) Ne5 and white bishops looks
miserable comparing to black knights.

After 11.e3 fxe3 [Not 11...g5
12.b5! and black must play 12...Nb8 or lose a pawn. After 12...Nb8
13.exf4 exf4 14.g4 Nd4 15.Nxd4 Bxd4 16.Bd5+ Kg7 17.Bb2 and White is
slight better due to better development and having blunted Black's
kingside intiative, while his queenside pressure is still going
strong.]12.dxe3 we have a position in which White's queenside
initiative is balanced by Black's on the kingside.

Ncd4 12.Nxd4 Nxd4
13.Qd1 Rb8 14.e3


I would prefer 13...c6, profilactic against xd5, releasing Bc8 and
opening a diagonal for Qd8. It is difficult for white to find a good
move here. Now after 13....Rb8 white can play 14.Bd5+ Kh8 15.e3 and
bishop is not traped

A little better would be Rb1 either here at move 16 to get the rook
off the diagonal. Followup ideas for White would be Bb2 to completely
nullify Black's ...e4 threat. By the way a threat of ...e4 is a
prevalent theme in positions form this opening where White has played
b4.

f3! {had a long think about fxg3 and
fxe3 lines, but this seemed best from a stand point
with an e4 trap following} 15.Bh1 {only move, bishop
for knight exchange just bad for white} Ne6! {makking
room for e4 and also knight can jump to c5/g5}
16.Bxf3?


This move starts the real decline in White's position. After 16.Rb1
Ng5 17.Re1 we get to a position that is rather cramped for White on
the king isde, but in which Black has difficulty attacking there as
well. This position is approximately equal.


I do not agree. For example 16.Rb1 Ng5 17.Re1 Nh3+ 18.Kf1 Qd7 19.Ne4
Qg4 20.Nd2 Ng5 21.h4 Qh5 22.Kg1 Nh3+ 23.Kf1 g5 anf black attack
becomes decisive.
Perhaps 16.Ne4 is white best chance, after 16.Bxf3? game is finished,
but anyway playing virtually without bishop is no fun either.

e4! 17.Bxe4 Bxc3 18.Rb1 Ng5 19.Bg2


White could have reduceed some Black's advantage by playing 19.Bd5+
followed by 20.f4 but he will still be down a piece for two pawns.

Bh3? {Nh3
was just won according to my engine, but i am playing
fast now sensing a win}


The reason that 19...Nh3+ wins is that you win the exchange by force:
19...Nh3 20.Bxh3 [20.Kh1 Nxf2+ is even worse] Bxh3 and Black can
trade obe of his bushops for the rook currently at f1. That would give
black material advantage of a rook for two pawns. Black's subsequent
plan should be to create open files for the rooks to perate on.

20.d4


20.f4 was better it being more important to drive away the knight than
to try to capture the bishop at c3. However, Black would still have a
large advantage.

Bxg2 21.Kxg2 d5!?
{immediate Qf6 was probably better/faster} 22.Qb3 Qf6
23.f4 Qf5 24.Bb2 Qe4+ 25.Kf2 Qf3+
26.Kg1 Nh3# {White checkmated} {Mate} 0-1


I realized here that most of my annotations are suggesting better
moves for White. This is because if White had played more accurately
he could have blunted your king-side initiative/attack and then
carried out operations on the queen-side giving him a slight
advantage. As White did play the game he gave Black a decisive
advantage by move 17.

If you want to understand these positions better you may want to look
at an opening book on the Closed Sicilian. There is a fairly good one:
"The Ultimate Closed Sicilian" by Gary Lane. Also John Donaladson's
book "A Strategic Opening Repertoire" has some discussion of this
opening from White's point of view. Lastly the book "Beating the
Flank Openings" (I forget the name of the author) offers some good
advice for black in playing against the English (as well as other
hypermodern openings).

Mike Ogush
USCF 1961

  #4   Report Post  
Old May 1st 04, 08:07 AM
Cyrill Oseledets
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis needed(A20/21)...English opening game

(Mike Ogush) wrote in message ...
On 29 Apr 2004 15:14:52 -0700,
(TruthXayer)
wrote:

Hi All,
Recently I was black and was faced with the English
opening. The game went into unchartered territories
pretty soon and hence I am looking for some
insights(mainly for black ideas to the English and
also inputs to how i handled the game). I have entered
my mini-analysis of the game too for my thoughts
during the game.


[Date "2004.04.28"]
[Round "-"]
[White "Alan"]
[Black "TruthX"]
[Result "0-1"]
[BlackElo "1876"]
[ECO "A21/20"]
[Opening "English Opening"]
[WhiteElo "1829"]


1.c4 g6 2.g3 Bg7 3.Bg2 e5


A common way for Black to combat the english is to play a reversed
Closed Sicilian, which is essentially what you did.

I play 1.e4 as White and when black plays 1...c5 I go for the closed
variations of the sicilain. Since I understand White's basic plans
here I play black against the English I go for a similar pawn
structure; a recent game I played as black went 1.c4 d6 2.g3 e5 3.Bg2
f5.

In such a reversed Closed Sicilian, black will be attacking on the
king side and white will be attacking on the queenside. This makes
White's later moves of a3, b4 easier to understand.

4.Nc3 Ne7


In the position with colors reversed White haas two popular ways of
proceeding:
a) develop the bishop to e3 and queen to d2 with the potential of
playing Bh6 at a convenient moment. in these lines White often devels
the king's knight to e7. In some variations it moves to g3 after a
further advance of the g-pawn.
b) play f4 with the idea of eventually playing f5. In most of these
lines White plays the knight to f3.

Since you later played ...f5, I would prefer playing it here and
developing the knight to f6 on the next move.

5.Nf3 d6!? {should
probably develop a piece instead like Nc6.} 6.O-O O-O
7.d3 f5!? {is this premature? have seen some english
games with this structure for black and got good
play...} 8.Qc2


This is actually White's first mistake (not 9.a3). In fact two moves
come to mind for White he either 8.a3 or 8.Rb1 and following up
with Bd2 and b4.


8.Qc2 is a standart move here. Was played for example Andersson -
Polugaevsky (Palma de Majorca 1972)

Nbc6 9.a3? {looks like a
weak move Nb4 not really a serious threat, looked like
a reactive move here by opponent} f4 10.b4 Nf5
{strongpointing outpost at d4} 11.b5!? {e3 was the
move i expected and was still thinking about it, when
opponent played this}



I would prefer 10... Bg4 to begin struggle for xd4

Actually 11.b5 is a minor mistake. White must play e3 to prevent
Black from planting a knight at d4.


Yes, exactly. Thats wy Bg4 seems more precise to me. If 10...Bg4 11.e3
e4!?
12.dxe4 Bxf3 13.Bxf3 fxe3 14.fxe3 (forced) Ne5 and white bishops looks
miserable comparing to black knights.

After 11.e3 fxe3 [Not 11...g5
12.b5! and black must play 12...Nb8 or lose a pawn. After 12...Nb8
13.exf4 exf4 14.g4 Nd4 15.Nxd4 Bxd4 16.Bd5+ Kg7 17.Bb2 and White is
slight better due to better development and having blunted Black's
kingside intiative, while his queenside pressure is still going
strong.]12.dxe3 we have a position in which White's queenside
initiative is balanced by Black's on the kingside.

Ncd4 12.Nxd4 Nxd4
13.Qd1 Rb8 14.e3


I would prefer 13...c6, profilactic against xd5, releasing Bc8 and
opening a diagonal for Qd8. It is difficult for white to find a good
move here. Now after 13....Rb8 white can play 14.Bd5+ Kh8 15.e3 and
bishop is not traped

A little better would be Rb1 either here at move 16 to get the rook
off the diagonal. Followup ideas for White would be Bb2 to completely
nullify Black's ...e4 threat. By the way a threat of ...e4 is a
prevalent theme in positions form this opening where White has played
b4.

f3! {had a long think about fxg3 and
fxe3 lines, but this seemed best from a stand point
with an e4 trap following} 15.Bh1 {only move, bishop
for knight exchange just bad for white} Ne6! {makking
room for e4 and also knight can jump to c5/g5}
16.Bxf3?


This move starts the real decline in White's position. After 16.Rb1
Ng5 17.Re1 we get to a position that is rather cramped for White on
the king isde, but in which Black has difficulty attacking there as
well. This position is approximately equal.


I do not agree. For example 16.Rb1 Ng5 17.Re1 Nh3+ 18.Kf1 Qd7 19.Ne4
Qg4 20.Nd2 Ng5 21.h4 Qh5 22.Kg1 Nh3+ 23.Kf1 g5 anf black attack
becomes decisive.
Perhaps 16.Ne4 is white best chance, after 16.Bxf3? game is finished,
but anyway playing virtually without bishop is no fun either.

e4! 17.Bxe4 Bxc3 18.Rb1 Ng5 19.Bg2


White could have reduceed some Black's advantage by playing 19.Bd5+
followed by 20.f4 but he will still be down a piece for two pawns.

Bh3? {Nh3
was just won according to my engine, but i am playing
fast now sensing a win}


The reason that 19...Nh3+ wins is that you win the exchange by force:
19...Nh3 20.Bxh3 [20.Kh1 Nxf2+ is even worse] Bxh3 and Black can
trade obe of his bushops for the rook currently at f1. That would give
black material advantage of a rook for two pawns. Black's subsequent
plan should be to create open files for the rooks to perate on.

20.d4


20.f4 was better it being more important to drive away the knight than
to try to capture the bishop at c3. However, Black would still have a
large advantage.

Bxg2 21.Kxg2 d5!?
{immediate Qf6 was probably better/faster} 22.Qb3 Qf6
23.f4 Qf5 24.Bb2 Qe4+ 25.Kf2 Qf3+
26.Kg1 Nh3# {White checkmated} {Mate} 0-1


I realized here that most of my annotations are suggesting better
moves for White. This is because if White had played more accurately
he could have blunted your king-side initiative/attack and then
carried out operations on the queen-side giving him a slight
advantage. As White did play the game he gave Black a decisive
advantage by move 17.

If you want to understand these positions better you may want to look
at an opening book on the Closed Sicilian. There is a fairly good one:
"The Ultimate Closed Sicilian" by Gary Lane. Also John Donaladson's
book "A Strategic Opening Repertoire" has some discussion of this
opening from White's point of view. Lastly the book "Beating the
Flank Openings" (I forget the name of the author) offers some good
advice for black in playing against the English (as well as other
hypermodern openings).

Mike Ogush
USCF 1961

Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:03 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Chess"

 

Copyright © 2017