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Old May 10th 04, 10:03 PM
P O S
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing against yourself

Thought I'd try something different and played myself. To get out of
book quickly I fixed the first two moves as 1. b3 b6 2. Bb2 Bb7. Then
simply played both sides. After a long fight I managed to outplay
myself with white. Comments, anyone (regarding the game)?

[Event ""]
[Site ""]
[Date "2004.05.10"]
[Round ""]
[White "me"]
[Black "me2"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. b3 b6 2. Bb2 Bb7 3. d4 e6 4. e3 Bb4+ 5. c3 Be7 6. Nf3 Nf6 7. Be2
O-O 8.
O-O d6 9. Nbd2 c5 10. Qc2 Nc6 11. e4 cxd4 12. cxd4 Rc8 13. Bc3 Nb4 14.
Qb2
d5 15. e5 Ne8 16. a3 Nc6 17. Bd3 g6 18. Rfc1 a6 19. b4 b5 20. a4 Na7
21.
axb5 Nxb5 22. Bxb5 axb5 23. Nb3 Ra8 24. Nc5 Rxa1 25. Rxa1 Bc8 26. Ra5
Nc7
27. Ne1 Bd7 28. Nc2 f5 29. Na3 Kf7 30. Qe2 Bxc5 31. dxc5 Qb8 32. f4
Rd8 33.
g4 Rg8 34. gxf5 gxf5+ 35. Kf2 Rg6 36. Qh5 Qg8 37. Ke3 Kf8 38. Nc2 Be8
39.
Qh4 Rg4 40. Qf6+ Qf7 41. Qxf7+ Bxf7 42. Ra7 Ne8 43. Nd4 Rg7 44. c6 Bg6
45.
Rxg7 Kxg7 46. Nxe6+ Kf7 47. c7 Nxc7 48. Nxc7 Ke7 49. Nxb5 Be8 50. Nd6
Bd7
51. b5 Kd8 52. b6 Bc6 53. Ba5 Kd7 54. b7 Bxb7 55. Nxb7 Ke6 56. Kd4 h5
57.
Nc5+ Ke7 58. Kxd5 h4 59. h3 Ke8 60. Ke6 Kf8 61. Kxf5 Ke7 62. e6 Ke8
63. Kf6
Kf8 64. Ne4 Ke8 65. Nd6+ Kf8 66. e7+ Kg8 67. e8=Q+ Kh7 68. Qg6+ Kh8
69.
Nf7#
1-0
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Old May 11th 04, 08:04 PM
P O S
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing against yourself

On 11 May 2004 14:01:31 GMT, CeeBee
wrote:

(P O S) wrote in rec.games.chess.analysis:


Nf7#


Wow. You didn't see that coming, didn't you?


It's just finding the best move in every position really. Of course
you won't play something that you, yourself, *see* is immediately
refuted if the opponent is alert. Such moves should not be played
unless you're forced to do so (here, a forced mate so it was just a
case of finding the quickest one, which I didn't). That's what you're
trying to do here, finding something that cannot be countered (as you
obviously won't make godlike moves every time, one side does get an
edge eventually which you should then take advantage of).

You play the position, not the opponent.
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Old May 12th 04, 12:09 AM
David
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing against yourself



"P O S" wrote in message
...
Thought I'd try something different and played myself. To get out of
book quickly I fixed the first two moves as 1. b3 b6 2. Bb2 Bb7. Then
simply played both sides. After a long fight I managed to outplay
myself with white. Comments, anyone (regarding the game)?


I've never done this before, at least, not seriously. I'll have to give it
a shot. An observation: We tend to have blind spots about our own games.
Those blind spots hurt when the opponent sees a weakness and takes advantage
of it. One of the characteristics of a game like this, playing against
yourself, is that you didn't take advantage of the weaknesses regularly.
The same failure to see the weakness when created also prevented you from
seeing that it was there. As such, playing through the game with an
analysis engine will highlight those weaknesses quicker than would be
experienced otherwise. I'm interested to see what comes out of my own
game.

David


--
without the block


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Old May 12th 04, 01:04 AM
Ron
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing against yourself

In article ,
"David" wrote:

I've never done this before, at least, not seriously. I'll have to give it
a shot. An observation: We tend to have blind spots about our own games.
Those blind spots hurt when the opponent sees a weakness and takes advantage
of it. One of the characteristics of a game like this, playing against
yourself, is that you didn't take advantage of the weaknesses regularly.


The big advantage, IMO, of course, of playing against yourself is that
you simply can't get into the habit of "hm, maybe he won't see it" which
a lot of people struggle to break.

The discipline that comes from knowing that your opponent will see
exactly what you see will force you to conduct chess as a battle of
ideas, which is what you should be doing anyway and should be
educational.

-Ron


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Old June 22nd 04, 12:40 PM
Necheva
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing against yourself

Ron wrote:

In article ,
"David" wrote:


I've never done this before, at least, not seriously. I'll have to give it
a shot. An observation: We tend to have blind spots about our own games.
Those blind spots hurt when the opponent sees a weakness and takes advantage
of it. One of the characteristics of a game like this, playing against
yourself, is that you didn't take advantage of the weaknesses regularly.



The big advantage, IMO, of course, of playing against yourself is that
you simply can't get into the habit of "hm, maybe he won't see it" which
a lot of people struggle to break.

The discipline that comes from knowing that your opponent will see
exactly what you see will force you to conduct chess as a battle of
ideas, which is what you should be doing anyway and should be
educational.

-Ron

huh huh - he's playing with himself.
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