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Old June 8th 04, 05:32 PM
Samiel
 
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Default Playing even...

Hi all!

When I play chess games against a friend of mine (Ben), we generally
play pretty even and never really clobber each other unless one of us
makes a really stupid mistake (i.e. putting a piece directly where it
can be taken).

Here's an example game...

As you can tell, we stay pretty even. I think Ben had the better game
initially, but had a bad endgame.

Could someone give some thoughts on this one?

Thanks!

White: Ben ;
Black: Samiel ;
07.06.2004 Begin: 17:43 End: 18:09

1. e2-e4 e7-e5
2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6
3. Nb1-c3 g7-g6
4. d2-d4 Bf8-g7
5. Bc1-g5 f7-f6
6. Bg5-e3 b7-b6
7. d4-d5 Nc6-b4
8. a2-a3 Nb4-a6
9. Nc3-b5 c7-c6
10. Nb5-d6+ Ke8-e7
11. Nd6:c8+ Qd8:c8
12. d5-d6+ Ke7-d8
13. Bf1-d3 Na6-c5
14. Bd3-c4 Nc5:e4
15. Qd1-d3 f6-f5
16. Bc4-a6 Qc8-b8
17. 0-0 Ne4:d6
18. Rf1-d1 b6-b5
19. Qd3:d6 Qb8:d6
20. Rd1:d6 Ra8-b8
21. Ra1-d1 Ng8-f6
22. Be3-g5 Kd8-e8
23. Nf3:e5 Nf6-e4
24. Rd6-d4 Ne4:g5
25. f2-f4 Ng5-e6
26. Rd4-d3 Rb8-b6
27. Ba6-c8 d7-d5
28. Bc8-d7+ Ke8-f8
29. Bd7:e6 Bg7:e5
30. f4:e5 Kf8-e7
31. Be6-c8 Rh8:c8
32. Rd3-e3 a7-a5
33. g2-g4 f5-f4
34. Re3-f3 g6-g5
35. h2-h3 a5-a4
36. h3-h4 h7-h6
37. Kg1-f2 b5-b4
38. h4:g5 h6:g5
39. Rf3-h3 b4:a3
40. b2:a3 Rb6-b2
41. Rh3-h7+ Ke7-d8
42. Rh7-h8+ Kd8-c7
43. Rh8-h7+ Kc7-b6
44. e5-e6 Rb2:c2+
45. Kf2-f3 Rc8-e8
46. Rh7-h6 Rc2-c3+
47. Kf3-g2 Rc3:a3
48. Rd1-b1+ Kb6-c7
49. Rh6-h7+ Kc7-d6
50. e6-e7 Re8:e7
51. Rh7-h6+ Kd6-d7
52. Rb1-b7+ Kd7-d8
53. Rh6-h7 Re7:h7
54. Rb7:h7 Ra3-a2+
55. Kg2-f3 Ra2-b2
56. Rh7-g7 a4-a3
57. Rg7:g5 a3-a2
58. Rg5-g8+ Kd8-c7
59. Kf3:f4 a2-a1Q
60. g4-g5 Rb2-b8
61. Rg8-g7+ Qa1:g7
62. g5-g6 Qg7:g6
White resigns
Time 10:02 06:04


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Old June 8th 04, 07:29 PM
mdamien
 
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Default Playing even...

"Samiel" wrote in message
...
Could someone give some thoughts on this one?


Let me see if anything really jumps out at me.


White: Ben ;
Black: Samiel ;
07.06.2004 Begin: 17:43 End: 18:09

1. e2-e4 e7-e5
2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6
3. Nb1-c3 g7-g6


I wouldn't normally find myself on either side of this line, so I don't know
what's considered good here. 3. ... g6 wouldn't have been my first choice
because it would be too early for me to make that kind of commitment
(weakening the kingside pawns and dark squares and delegating the bishop to
the role of overprotector), but on the other hand it does have a point after
White plays d4.

4. d2-d4 Bf8-g7
5. Bc1-g5 f7-f6
6. Bg5-e3 b7-b6


Another fianchetto. This one doesn't feel right.

7. d4-d5 Nc6-b4
8. a2-a3 Nb4-a6
9. Nc3-b5 c7-c6


My first thought was 9. Bb5 where Black is seriously lagging in development.
9. Nb5 might be good if it proves something.

10. Nb5-d6+ Ke8-e7
11. Nd6:c8+ Qd8:c8


With the capture, it would appear that 9. Nb5 *didn't* prove anything. White
uses four tempi to exchange Black's undeveloped bishop.

12. d5-d6+ Ke7-d8


This push 12. d6+ is suspect. While it's "in Black's face" at the moment, I
don't think White hasn't the resources to hold on to it.

13. Bf1-d3 Na6-c5


I can't imagine why White would develop his bishop to d3, blocking the d
file and pointing at granite (g6 and g7). Bc4 or Be2 would be preferable.

14. Bd3-c4 Nc5:e4


Now White changes his mind and decides on c4 after all. I would be inclined
to just exchange the knight at this point (14. Bxc5) and play N-d2-c4 (or
g3). The bishop on d3 is getting in the way though.

15. Qd1-d3 f6-f5


This does open the h4-d8 diagonal for White (though Black can generally just
move his king to e8) and takes support away from e5. Perhaps it would be
better to just hop back to c5.

16. Bc4-a6 Qc8-b8


White's driving Black to better squares.

17. 0-0 Ne4:d6


17. O-O is too slow here. Of course, Black should now just play 17. ...
Qxd6.

18. Rf1-d1 b6-b5


This looks like another pretty big mistake, but Black was starting to feel
uncomfortable. Probably 18. ... f4 was the way to go, followed by Ke7. You'd
have to check that with a computer.

19. Qd3:d6 Qb8:d6
20. Rd1:d6 Ra8-b8


Black is in a tight spot now, but what future does this rook have on b8?

21. Ra1-d1 Ng8-f6
22. Be3-g5 Kd8-e8
23. Nf3:e5 Nf6-e4


White was getting a little greedy there. Bxf6 and Rxd7 was sufficient.

24. Rd6-d4 Ne4:g5


Another mistake by White. He's trying to hold on to too much. He could just
play Nxd7 with a comfortable win. Instead, he drops a piece.

25. f2-f4 Ng5-e6


Black's turn to slip. 25. ... Bxe5 26. fxe5 Rd8.

26. Rd4-d3 Rb8-b6


Why doesn't White play Rxd7? I can't fathom why he'd play Rd3.Now, Black is
in fine shape after Bxe5 followed by Nc5, but instead he's looking to "make
right" the mistake at move 20, and instead forces White to save himself.

27. Ba6-c8 d7-d5


Whoops. Left the knight hanging.

28. Bc8-d7+ Ke8-f8


White trusts Black too much, or he wouldn't have missed Bxe6. Black now
hopes he'll miss it a second time -- but why not Ke7 and hope he'll miss
Bxd5?

29. Bd7:e6 Bg7:e5
30. f4:e5 Kf8-e7


OK, so Black had a little cleverness in mind, but was the idea really worth
two pawns (after 31. Bxd5)?

31. Be6-c8 Rh8:c8


When a piece "sells itself," it should do so for more than an empty square.
Now, once again, Black is in the driver's seat with an extra pawn, while one
of White's is weak.

32. Rd3-e3 a7-a5
33. g2-g4 f5-f4
34. Re3-f3 g6-g5
35. h2-h3 a5-a4
36. h3-h4 h7-h6
37. Kg1-f2 b5-b4
38. h4:g5 h6:g5
39. Rf3-h3 b4:a3
40. b2:a3 Rb6-b2
41. Rh3-h7+ Ke7-d8


Why d8? This doesn't make sense to me. Not that it matters all that much ...

42. Rh7-h8+ Kd8-c7
43. Rh8-h7+ Kc7-b6


OK, he ran to safety, but there were much more effective ways of providing
that.

44. e5-e6 Rb2:c2+
45. Kf2-f3 Rc8-e8
46. Rh7-h6 Rc2-c3+
47. Kf3-g2 Rc3:a3
48. Rd1-b1+ Kb6-c7
49. Rh6-h7+ Kc7-d6
50. e6-e7 Re8:e7


White can resign any time now.

51. Rh7-h6+ Kd6-d7
52. Rb1-b7+ Kd7-d8
53. Rh6-h7 Re7:h7
54. Rb7:h7 Ra3-a2+
55. Kg2-f3 Ra2-b2
56. Rh7-g7 a4-a3
57. Rg7:g5 a3-a2
58. Rg5-g8+ Kd8-c7
59. Kf3:f4 a2-a1Q
60. g4-g5 Rb2-b8
61. Rg8-g7+ Qa1:g7
62. g5-g6 Qg7:g6
White resigns
Time 10:02 06:04




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Old June 8th 04, 09:34 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing even...

En/na mdamien ha escrit:

White: Ben ;
Black: Samiel ;
07.06.2004 Begin: 17:43 End: 18:09

1. e2-e4 e7-e5
2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6
3. Nb1-c3 g7-g6
4. d2-d4 Bf8-g7
5. Bc1-g5 f7-f6
6. Bg5-e3 b7-b6
7. d4-d5 Nc6-b4
8. a2-a3 Nb4-a6
9. Nc3-b5 c7-c6


My first thought was 9. Bb5 where Black is seriously lagging in development.
9. Nb5 might be good if it proves something.

10. Nb5-d6+ Ke8-e7
11. Nd6:c8+ Qd8:c8


With the capture, it would appear that 9. Nb5 *didn't* prove anything. White
uses four tempi to exchange Black's undeveloped bishop.


Let's compa last three moves of white are Nb5, Nd6 and Nxc8, ... and
last three moves of black are c6,Ke7 and Qc8.

I do not like Nb5, but It seems to me that white position is better than
three moves earlier because black has not developed too much pieces in
those last three moves and he has lost the right to castle.

AT

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Old June 8th 04, 09:52 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing even...

En/na mdamien ha escrit:

White: Ben ;
Black: Samiel ;
07.06.2004 Begin: 17:43 End: 18:09
1. e2-e4 e7-e5
2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6
3. Nb1-c3 g7-g6
4. d2-d4 Bf8-g7
5. Bc1-g5 f7-f6
6. Bg5-e3 b7-b6
7. d4-d5 Nc6-b4
8. a2-a3 Nb4-a6
9. Nc3-b5 c7-c6
10. Nb5-d6+ Ke8-e7
11. Nd6:c8+ Qd8:c8
12. d5-d6+ Ke7-d8
13. Bf1-d3 Na6-c5
14. Bd3-c4 Nc5:e4
15. Qd1-d3 f6-f5
16. Bc4-a6 Qc8-b8
17. 0-0 Ne4:d6
18. Rf1-d1 b6-b5
19. Qd3:d6 Qb8:d6
20. Rd1:d6 Ra8-b8
21. Ra1-d1 Ng8-f6
22. Be3-g5 Kd8-e8
23. Nf3:e5 Nf6-e4
24. Rd6-d4 Ne4:g5
25. f2-f4 Ng5-e6
26. Rd4-d3 Rb8-b6
27. Ba6-c8 d7-d5
28. Bc8-d7+ Ke8-f8
29. Bd7:e6 Bg7:e5
30. f4:e5 Kf8-e7
31. Be6-c8 Rh8:c8
32. Rd3-e3 a7-a5
33. g2-g4 f5-f4
34. Re3-f3 g6-g5
35. h2-h3 a5-a4
36. h3-h4 h7-h6
37. Kg1-f2 b5-b4
38. h4:g5 h6:g5
39. Rf3-h3 b4:a3
40. b2:a3 Rb6-b2
41. Rh3-h7+ Ke7-d8
42. Rh7-h8+ Kd8-c7
43. Rh8-h7+ Kc7-b6
44. e5-e6 Rb2:c2+
45. Kf2-f3 Rc8-e8
46. Rh7-h6 Rc2-c3+
47. Kf3-g2 Rc3:a3
48. Rd1-b1+ Kb6-c7
49. Rh6-h7+ Kc7-d6
50. e6-e7 Re8:e7


White can resign any time now.

51. Rh7-h6+ Kd6-d7
52. Rb1-b7+ Kd7-d8
53. Rh6-h7 Re7:h7
54. Rb7:h7 (...) 0-1


Matt, I agree with many of the comments you wrote, but this last one is
simply curious!!

After 51.Rh7-h6+ there are 5 legal moves, the move of the game lead to
draw and the other 4 are a simple win

after 51.Rh6 Kd7?? 52 Rb7 Kd8 white can play 53.Rh8! Rd8 54.R8h7 and the
game is draw. (the power of 7th file domination)

AT

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Old June 8th 04, 09:55 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing even...

En/na Samiel ha escrit:
Hi all!
White: Ben ;
Black: Samiel ;
07.06.2004 Begin: 17:43 End: 18:09
White resigns
Time 10:02 06:04


Hello Samiel,

just curious,
.... what was the time control of that game?
.... are the final times the time remaining or the time used?

I can see that game was played in 26 minutes and if there is nothing
wrong the only possibility is a 21 minutes game!!

AT



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Old June 8th 04, 10:24 PM
Samiel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing even...

On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 22:55:28 +0200, Antonio Torrecillas
wrote:


Hello Samiel,

just curious,
... what was the time control of that game?
... are the final times the time remaining or the time used?

I can see that game was played in 26 minutes and if there is nothing
wrong the only possibility is a 21 minutes game!!

AT

Actually, the game had no real time constraints. It was played on a
friendly basis and we gave each other as much time as needed.

- Samiel
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Old June 8th 04, 11:08 PM
mdamien
 
Posts: n/a
Default Playing even...

"Antonio Torrecillas" wrote in message
...
En/na mdamien ha escrit:

White: Ben ;
Black: Samiel ;
07.06.2004 Begin: 17:43 End: 18:09

1. e2-e4 e7-e5
2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6
3. Nb1-c3 g7-g6
4. d2-d4 Bf8-g7
5. Bc1-g5 f7-f6
6. Bg5-e3 b7-b6
7. d4-d5 Nc6-b4
8. a2-a3 Nb4-a6
9. Nc3-b5 c7-c6


My first thought was 9. Bb5 where Black is seriously lagging in

development.
9. Nb5 might be good if it proves something.

10. Nb5-d6+ Ke8-e7
11. Nd6:c8+ Qd8:c8


With the capture, it would appear that 9. Nb5 *didn't* prove anything.

White
uses four tempi to exchange Black's undeveloped bishop.


Let's compa last three moves of white are Nb5, Nd6 and Nxc8, ... and
last three moves of black are c6,Ke7 and Qc8.

I do not like Nb5, but It seems to me that white position is better than
three moves earlier because black has not developed too much pieces in
those last three moves and he has lost the right to castle.


Good point.


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Old June 8th 04, 11:25 PM
mdamien
 
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Default Playing even...

"Antonio Torrecillas" wrote in message
...
En/na mdamien ha escrit:

49. Rh6-h7+ Kc7-d6
50. e6-e7 Re8:e7


White can resign any time now.

51. Rh7-h6+ Kd6-d7
52. Rb1-b7+ Kd7-d8
53. Rh6-h7 Re7:h7
54. Rb7:h7 (...) 0-1


Matt, I agree with many of the comments you wrote, but this last one is
simply curious!!

After 51.Rh7-h6+ there are 5 legal moves, the move of the game lead to
draw and the other 4 are a simple win

after 51.Rh6 Kd7?? 52 Rb7 Kd8 white can play 53.Rh8! Rd8 54.R8h7 and the
game is draw. (the power of 7th file domination)


I'll admit that I didn't actually look past move 50. Rxe7. I just counted
pawns, didn't see counterplay (51. Rh6 Re6), and figured White was lost.
Goes to show, one should be careful about resigning!

Matt


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Old June 9th 04, 03:30 AM
Mike Ogush
 
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Default Playing even...

On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 16:32:00 GMT, Samiel wrote:

Hi all!

When I play chess games against a friend of mine (Ben), we generally
play pretty even and never really clobber each other unless one of us
makes a really stupid mistake (i.e. putting a piece directly where it
can be taken).

Here's an example game...

As you can tell, we stay pretty even. I think Ben had the better game
initially, but had a bad endgame.

Could someone give some thoughts on this one?


My thoughts: this is a game where the person, who makes the last big
mistake loses.

Thanks!

White: Ben ;
Black: Samiel ;
07.06.2004 Begin: 17:43 End: 18:09

1. e2-e4 e7-e5
2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6
3. Nb1-c3 g7-g6
4. d2-d4 Bf8-g7


Better was 4...exd4 5.Nxd4 Bg7 since 4...Bg7 allows either
a) 5.d5 Nd4 (not 5...Nb8 6.d6 c6 7.Bc4 and Black will have great
difficulty developing) 6.Nxd4 exd4 7.Nb4 this doesn't lose a pawn as
ait first might appear, but after Black regains the pawn he is a
slightly inferor position, e,g, 7...a6 8.Nxd4 Qh4 9.Qd3 Nf6 10.Be3
Nxe4 11.g3 Qe7 12.O-O-O +/=, or
b) 5.dxe5 Nxe5 6.Nxe5 Bxe5 7.Bc4 +/=. White will get f4 with tempo on
the Be5. Another possibility is that Black will play ...Bxc3 to
double White's c-pawns but that would make Black very weak on the dark
squares.

5. Bc1-g5 f7-f6
6. Bg5-e3 b7-b6


Once again taking on d4 was better than allowing d5: 6...exd4 7.Nxd4
Nge7 8.Bc4 Nxd4 9.Qxd4 Nc6 10.Qd2 +/-

7. d4-d5 Nc6-b4
8. a2-a3 Nb4-a6


Here White would could increased his advantage with 9.Bc4 threatening
Qe2 attacking the Na6 and d6 with a subsequent Qd5 if Black does not
prevent it. This will reach similar varations to those I gave after
Black's 4th move where Black has his developed pieces awkwardly placed
and has difficulty bringing out the undeveloped pieces.

9. Nc3-b5 c7-c6?


Much better was 9...Nh6 10.d6 c6 only playing c6 when White cannot go
to d6 with his knight and after 11.Nc3 b5 12.Be2 Bb7 13.O-O O-O 14.h3
Nf7 Whites's plus is minimized.

10. Nb5-d6+


Here White missed a nice little combo that wins a pawn: 10.dxc6 dxc6
11.Qxd8+ Kxd8 12.Nxa7 and Black cannot play 12...Rxa7 due to 13.Bxb6+
Rc7 14.Rd1+ and to get out of check either the Na6 or Rc7 must be left
hanging.

Ke8-e7
11. Nd6:c8+ Qd8:c8


Here white could just exchange at c6 and continue developing: 12.dxc6
dxc6 13.Qd2 +/- White can easiliy develop Bc4, O-O-O or Rd1 & O-O
while Black has awkward time completing his development: his king
blocks the only afe square for the king's knight, his queen is tied
down to the defense of the knight, he can't castle

The move played (10.d6+) also makes it very hard for Black to develop.
addtionally the pawn at d6 sets the plans for both sides: Black must
get rid od the d6-pawn which is cramping his position and making it
very hard to develop. White either wants to maintain the pawn at d6
or get a large development advanatge and then attack on the king while
balck is maneuvering to win the pawn.

12. d5-d6+ Ke7-d8


Slightly better is Ke8; it allows the queen to escape its imprisonment
via d8.

13. Bf1-d3


Better is 13.Qd2 preventing Black from developing with Nh6 and also
preparing moving the rook to d1. If 13...Nc5 14.Bc5 bxc5 15.Qa5+ and
16.Qxc5 picks up a pawn while maintaining pressure.

Na6-c5
14. Bd3-c4


White should capture the knight: 14.Bxc5 bxc5 15.Nd2 with Nc4 to
follow when it is almost impossible to dislodge the knight. The move
played hangs a pawn and increases the chances that Black will
successfully capture the d6-pawn.

Nc5:e4
15. Qd1-d3 f6-f5
16. Bc4-a6


This just provokes the queen into going to the square it wants to move
to anyway. Better was 16.O-O Qb8 17.Rd1

Qc8-b8
17. 0-0


White again fails to notice that a pawn is hanging.

Ne4:d6


Better to capture the pawn with the queen (17...Qxd6) since the trade
of queens favors Black and if white avoids the trade 18.Qc4 Qf6
19.Rad1 Kc7 is even better for Black.

18. Rf1-d1 b6-b5


Now it black's turn to notice that the Nd6 is now attacked more times
than it is defended or Black thought that he could trap the bishop at
a6. However, even if the bishop was trapped there are two
considerations:
a) White can continue developing with tempo and possible breaktrough
to Black;'s king which is stuck in the center.
b) the bishop will be able to take a pawn or two with it when it goes.

19. Qd3:d6 Qb8:d6
20. Rd1:d6 Ra8-b8


Somewhat better was 20...Ke8 so that after 21.Rad1 Nf6 22.Bg5 the Nf6
is not pinned.

21. Ra1-d1 Ng8-f6
22. Be3-g5 Kd8-e8
23. Nf3:e5?!


Before this move White had a won game and could ended the game quickly
by just winning another piece: 23.Bxf6 Bxf6 24.Rxf6

Also good was 23.Rxf6 Bxf6 24.Bxf6 Rf8 25.Bxe5 Rb6 26.Bc8 Rf7 27.Bc7
+- but this second varition is more to calculate.

23.Nxe5 is not bad per se but it is the start of White overlooking
several opportunities to increase his advanatge and instead making
moves that steadily descrease his advantahe from +- to +/- to = to
-/+.

Nf6-e4
24. Rd6-d4


Here Black has just threatened to either win the exchange at d6 or to
take the bishop at g5. White responds to one threat while overlooking
the other. Better would be to to continue the attack with 24.Nxd7
which attacks the undefended rook at b8. The best black can do is
just exchange rooks with 24...Nxd6 (24...Nxg5 25.Nxb8 Black is down a
rook and White still has a strong attack after 26.Rxc6; 24...Ra8
25.Re6+ Kf7 26.Re7+ Kg8 27.Bb7 and will at least the exchange) 25.Nxb8
Ne4 26.Be3 bxb2 7.Nxc6 and Black is only down a piece for a pawn.

Ne4:g5


Now white may still have a winning advantage due to blacks' backward
development, but only if he makes the next move correctly.

25. f2-f4?


25.Nxd7! Rd8 (25...Bxd4 26.Nxb8 Bxb2 27.Nxc6 +/- because White is
going to capture both of the queen-side pawns and Black can capture
only one of white's.) 26.R4d3 Bxb2 27.Bb7 Ne4 28.Rb1 Bg7 29.Bxc6 Rc8
30.Bxb5 f3 31.Nc3 Kd8 32.Ne5+ Kc7 33.Rd7+ Kb6 34.Bd3 Bxe5 35.Bxc2 +-
White has a clear exchange plus.

Ng5-e6?!


Black should just capture the knight: 25...Bxe5 26.fxe5 Rd8 and force
white to use tempi getting the Ba6 out and trying to recover the pawn
deficit, while Black finally develops his king's rook. 25...Ne6
should have just lost two pawns to 26.Rxd7 Rd8 (26...Bxe5 27.fxe5 Rd8
28.Bb7 Rxd7 29.Bxc6 Nc5 30.e6 a6 31.exd7+ Ke7 32.b4 Ne4 Bb7+-)
27.Rxd8+ Nxd8 28.Nxc6 Nxc6 29.Bxb5 Bxb2 30.Bxc6+ Ke7 31.Rd7+ Ke6
32.Rd3 +/- White is up a passed pawn on the queenside, but still has
some chances to defend now that he can get his rook in play.

26. Rd4-d3 Rb8-b6


There was a better way to attack the Ba6: 26...Bxe5! 27.fxe5 Nc5!
28.Rd6 Rd8 29.a4 to get aas much for the bishop as he can Nxa6 30.axb5
Nb8 31.bxc6 Nxc6

27. Ba6-c8 d7-d5?


Hangs the knight at e6. Amazingly White doesn't notice and capture it
for a move. Better was 27...Nxf4 28.Rxd7 Bxe5 29.Rd8+ Ke7 30.R1d7+
Kf6 31.Rxh8 Bxb2 32.Rhxh7 Bxa3 33.Rxa7 Bc5+ when white has only the
exchange for a pawn and a slight advantage.

28. Bc8-d7+ Ke8-f8


28...Ke7! 29.Bxe6 Kxe6 30.Re1 Bxe5 31.Rxe5+ Kd6 32.Rde3 Rd8 =/+

29. Bd7:e6 Bg7:e5
30. f4:e5 Kf8-e7
31. Be6-c8


The last major mistake. White should have noticed he could not save
the bishop and just gotten as many pawns as he could for it: 31.Bxd5
cxd5 32.Rxd5 b4 33.axb4 Rxb4 34.b3 Rc8 35.R1d2 Rc7. White is up a
pawn but a pawn plus is often not enough to win a rook ending.
Rh8:c8
32. Rd3-e3 a7-a5
33. g2-g4 f5-f4


Better is 33...fxg4! 34.b4 Rf8 -+. The problem with 33...f4 is that
White can reduce his disadvantage with 34.Rh3 Rh8 35.Rf1 Ke6 36.Rxf4
Kxe5 37.Rf7 because White can restore material equality.

34. Re3-f3


Now white is just lost
g6-g5
35. h2-h3 a5-a4
36. h3-h4 h7-h6
37. Kg1-f2 b5-b4
38. h4:g5 h6:g5
39. Rf3-h3 b4:a3
40. b2:a3 Rb6-b2
41. Rh3-h7+ Ke7-d8
42. Rh7-h8+ Kd8-c7
43. Rh8-h7+ Kc7-b6
44. e5-e6 Rb2:c2+
45. Kf2-f3 Rc8-e8
46. Rh7-h6 Rc2-c3+
47. Kf3-g2 Rc3:a3
48. Rd1-b1+ Kb6-c7
49. Rh6-h7+ Kc7-d6
50. e6-e7 Re8:e7
51. Rh7-h6+ Kd6-d7
52. Rb1-b7+ Kd7-d8
53. Rh6-h7 Re7:h7
54. Rb7:h7 Ra3-a2+?!


Since Black is clearly winning he must on the alert to never stalemate
his opponents king. This move and the following allow White a drawing
resource. Better was just to strart pushing the passed c- and
d-pawns: 54...d4 or win white's last remaining pawn with 54...Rg3+
55.Kf2 Rxg4

55. Kg2-f3 Ra2-b2
56. Rh7-g7


Since his king is stalemated White does not fear capture of his rook:
56.Rd7+ Black has only one way to avoid perpetual check or the
stalemate: 56...Kc8 57.Rc7+ Kb8 58.Rc8+ Ka7 59.Ra8+ Kb6 50.Rb8+ Ka5
51.Rxb2 and White has caused Black to have to work much harder for the
win.

a4-a3
57. Rg7:g5 a3-a2
58. Rg5-g8+ Kd8-c7
59. Kf3:f4 a2-a1Q
60. g4-g5 Rb2-b8
61. Rg8-g7+ Qa1:g7
62. g5-g6 Qg7:g6
White resigns
Time 10:02 06:04



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