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Old June 9th 04, 06:39 PM
Geoffrey Caveney
 
Posts: n/a
Default novelty in 5.Bg5 Grunfeld played against me at Chicago Open

An interesting novelty and an interesting game, I thought. The game
also took place in an important tournament situation, both players
having 3.5/4 with three rounds to go. Maybe the game took something
out of both of us, as we both lost the next morning's round. At the
time, though, I was just glad the game ended reasonably soon after the
first time control, as each of my previous three games had gone the
maximum six hours!

I'd be very interested in other people's comments and analysis of the
game. After Black's sharp novelty and White's sharp reply, critical
points of the game I identified include White's mistaken decision on
move 16, Black's 27th move and White's reply, and Black's 34th move
heading toward the drawn endgame. I wonder if Black missed any good
winning possibilites -- his position looks so much better after move
20, yet I don't see any clear mistakes he made between that point and
the eventual draw.

Geoffrey Caveney


[Event "Chicago Open, U2200 Section"]
[Site "Chicago"]
[Date "2004.05.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Caveney, Geoffrey"]
[Black "Movsisyan, Movses"]
[WhiteElo "2122"]
[BlackElo "2199"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7.
Nxg5 e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 f5

{The free online version of Chessbase at www.chesslive.de has no games
at all with this move! Does Chess Assistant have any? Interestingly,
my opponent played this move instantly, even quicker than he had
played the previous book moves, which leads me to think it was a
prepared innovation.}

11. O-O-O

{I didn't think} (11. Nb5 Na6 12. Rc1 c6) {did too much for me, so I
looked for sharper lines, in particular involving a pawn sac for
development with e4 and Bc4. But I didn't like to leave d4 hanging,
and Rd1 could allow Black to play ...Qa5+ in a couple moves, an
awkward check to deal with. So after a long think, I played O-O-O!?}

c6 12. e4 h6 13. Nf3 g5 14. Qe3 fxe4 15. Nd2

{White still retains possibilities to open the game up against Black's
exposed king.}

Qf6

{Now White faces a major decision. I probably should have slightly
misplaced a knight with} (16. Nb3) {in order to retain the chance of
opening the position soon with enough active pieces to compensate for
my pawn down. Instead I decided to allow a queenless pawn-down
position, but one where I hoped to keep compensation with my lead in
development.}

16. f3 {?} Qxd4 17. Qxd4 Bxd4 18. fxe4 Bxc3 19. bxc3 Bg4 20. Re1 Rh7

{A strong move! White does not appear to have sufficient compensation
for the pawn.}

21. h3 Bh5 22. g4 Bg6 23. exd5 cxd5 24. Bg2 Rd7 25. h4 {!?} gxh4 26.
Rxh4 Kg7 27. Re5

{My original idea} (27. Reh1 Nc6 28. Rxh6 Ne5) {pays too high a price
to regain the pawn, so I change plans and luckily get something out of
it.}

Na6

{Black probably felt} (Nc6 28. Rxd5) {simplified the position too much
to give him good winning chances.}

28. g5

{My best move of the game. Rook activity and counterplay on the g-file
is more important than winning back the pawn on d5.}

hxg5 29. Rxg5 Rc8 30. Kb2 d4 31. c4 Rc5 32. Rg3 {!} Rd6 33. Be4 Rb6+
34. Kc1 Re5

{I was expecting} (Nb4 {but White's pressure proves stronger than
Black's after} 35. Rhg4 Nxa2+ 36. Kc2 d3+ 37. Kxd3 {!} ) {While my
opponent was thinking about his move, I saw this line up to 36...d3+
but I did not see 37. Kxd3!, so after} (Nb4 {I was actually planning
to play the weaker} 35. a3)

35. Nf3 Re6 36. Nxd4 Rf6 37. Rhg4 Nc5 38. Bxg6 Rxg6 39. Nf5+ Kf7 40.
Rxg6 Rxg6 41. Rxg6 Kxg6

{and a draw was soon agreed:}

42. Nd4 Kf6 43. Kc2 Ke5 44. Kc3 {!} a6 45. Nb3 Kd6 46. Kb4 Nd3+ 47.
Kc3 Ne5 48. Na5 Kc7 49. Nb3 Kb6 1/2-1/2
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Old June 9th 04, 08:41 PM
David Richerby
 
Posts: n/a
Default novelty in 5.Bg5 Grunfeld played against me at Chicago Open

Geoffrey Caveney wrote:
1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7.
Nxg5 e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 f5

The free online version of Chessbase at www.chesslive.de has no games
at all with this move! Does Chess Assistant have any?


NCO doesn't mention this line; it doesn't appear in any game in the
Chessbase database that comes with Fritz 8.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Moistened Edible Tool (TM): it's like
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ a screwdriver but you can eat it and
it's moist!
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Old June 10th 04, 01:11 AM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default novelty in 5.Bg5 Grunfeld played against me at Chicago Open

On 9 Jun 2004 10:39:11 -0700, (Geoffrey Caveney)
wrote:

An interesting novelty and an interesting game, I thought. The game
also took place in an important tournament situation, both players
having 3.5/4 with three rounds to go. Maybe the game took something
out of both of us, as we both lost the next morning's round. At the
time, though, I was just glad the game ended reasonably soon after the
first time control, as each of my previous three games had gone the
maximum six hours!

I'd be very interested in other people's comments and analysis of the
game. After Black's sharp novelty and White's sharp reply, critical
points of the game I identified include White's mistaken decision on
move 16, Black's 27th move and White's reply, and Black's 34th move
heading toward the drawn endgame. I wonder if Black missed any good
winning possibilites -- his position looks so much better after move
20, yet I don't see any clear mistakes he made between that point and
the eventual draw.

Geoffrey Caveney


[Event "Chicago Open, U2200 Section"]
[Site "Chicago"]
[Date "2004.05.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Caveney, Geoffrey"]
[Black "Movsisyan, Movses"]
[WhiteElo "2122"]
[BlackElo "2199"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7.
Nxg5 e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 f5

{The free online version of Chessbase at
www.chesslive.de has no games
at all with this move! Does Chess Assistant have any? Interestingly,
my opponent played this move instantly, even quicker than he had
played the previous book moves, which leads me to think it was a
prepared innovation.}


I also could not find any games with this move, although I did find
several hundred games that reached the positon just before Black's
10th. Black's previous responses have been 10...Bf6, 10...Qf6,
10...Qd7 and 10...f6 (with the latter two only played in a few games
with miserable results for Black).

11. O-O-O

{I didn't think} (11. Nb5 Na6 12. Rc1 c6) {did too much for me, so I
looked for sharper lines, in particular involving a pawn sac for
development with e4 and Bc4. But I didn't like to leave d4 hanging,
and Rd1 could allow Black to play ...Qa5+ in a couple moves, an
awkward check to deal with. So after a long think, I played O-O-O!?}


After looking at the position a while I would prefer to castle
kingside and use the half open c-file for a rook, possibly conducting
a minority attack: 11.e3 Bf6 12.Nf3 Kg7 13.Be2 and 14.O-O.

c6 12. e4


even here I prefer e3. I don't like the sacrifice because in addition
to losing material, Black can force White pieces to bad squares. Also
now the queen and king are on the same diagonal so the threat of Bg5
skewering the queen to the king can arise.

h6


Even better 12...Bf6 13.h4 (not 13.Nf3 dxe4 and White loses a piece;
if 13.Nh3 fxe4 {raising possibility of ...Bxh3 and ...Bg5 after
unpinning the bishop} 14.g4 h6 and white has little compensation for
the pawn.) 13...fxe4 {freeing the the Bc8}. If 14.f3 h6 15.Nh3 exf3
16.gxf5 g5 17.Qg3 (17.hxg5 hxg5 18.Qg3 Rh4 and White doesn't have
enough for the pawn)
13. Nf3 g5 14. Qe3 fxe4 15. Nd2

{White still retains possibilities to open the game up against Black's
exposed king.}

Qf6

{Now White faces a major decision. I probably should have slightly
misplaced a knight with} (16. Nb3) {in order to retain the chance of
opening the position soon with enough active pieces to compensate for
my pawn down. Instead I decided to allow a queenless pawn-down
position, but one where I hoped to keep compensation with my lead in
development.}


16.Nb3 Qf4 and after queens are exchanges White's attack is gone and
he is left a pawn down.

16. f3 {?} Qxd4 17. Qxd4 Bxd4 18. fxe4 Bxc3 19. bxc3 Bg4 20. Re1 Rh7

{A strong move! White does not appear to have sufficient compensation
for the pawn.}

21. h3 Bh5 21...Be6 22.exd5 Bxd5 23.c4 Bg8 24.Bd3 Rf7
22. g4 Bg6 23. exd5 cxd5 24. Bg2 Rd7 25. h4 {!?} gxh4 26.
Rxh4 Kg7 27. Re5

{My original idea} (27. Reh1 Nc6 28. Rxh6 Ne5) {pays too high a price
to regain the pawn, so I change plans and luckily get something out of
it.}

Na6

{Black probably felt} (Nc6 28. Rxd5) {simplified the position too much
to give him good winning chances.}


It seems to be that 27...Bf7 holds the pawn

28. g5

{My best move of the game. Rook activity and counterplay on the g-file
is more important than winning back the pawn on d5.}

hxg5 29. Rxg5 Rc8 30. Kb2 d4 31. c4 Rc5 32. Rg3 {!} Rd6 33. Be4 Rb6+
34. Kc1 Re5

{I was expecting} (Nb4 {but White's pressure proves stronger than
Black's after} 35. Rhg4 Nxa2+ 36. Kc2 d3+ 37. Kxd3 {!} ) {While my
opponent was thinking about his move, I saw this line up to 36...d3+
but I did not see 37. Kxd3!, so after} (Nb4 {I was actually planning
to play the weaker} 35. a3)


Black can play 36...Rcc6 which leads to equality, which is better than
what could have happened.


35. Nf3 Re6 36. Nxd4 Rf6 37. Rhg4


Here White missed a tactical shot, which wins: 37.Nf5+ Kf8 (37...Kf7
38.Bd5+ Rfe6 39.Nd4 Nc7 40.Nxe6 Nxe6 41.Rh6 Bf5 42.Rf3+- White will be
up a piece; 37...Rxf5 38.Bxf5 Rf6 39.Rh5 Kf7 40.Bxg6+ Rxg6 41.Rh7+ Kf6
42.Rxg6+ Kxg6 43.Rxb7 +-; 37...Kg8 38.Bd5+ Rbe6 39.Nd4 Nc7 40.Nxe6
Nxe6 41.Re4 Kf7 42.Rxe6 Rxe6 43.Bxe6 +-) 38.Rh8+ Kf7 39.Bd5+ Rbe6
40.Nxe6+ Kxe6 41.Nd4+ Ke5 42.Rd8 and white has won the exchange

Nc5 38. Bxg6 Rxg6 39. Nf5+ Kf7 40.
Rxg6 Rxg6 41. Rxg6 Kxg6

{and a draw was soon agreed:}

42. Nd4 Kf6 43. Kc2 Ke5 44. Kc3 {!} a6 45. Nb3 Kd6 46. Kb4 Nd3+ 47.
Kc3 Ne5 48. Na5 Kc7 49. Nb3 Kb6 1/2-1/2


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Old June 10th 04, 03:09 PM
Antonio Torrecillas
 
Posts: n/a
Default novelty in 5.Bg5 Grunfeld played against me at Chicago Open

En/na Mike Ogush ha escrit:
[Event "Chicago Open, U2200 Section"]
[Site "Chicago"]
[Date "2004.05.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Caveney, Geoffrey"]
[Black "Movsisyan, Movses"]
[WhiteElo "2122"]
[BlackElo "2199"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7.
Nxg5 e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 f5 11. O-O-O

{I didn't think} (11. Nb5 Na6 12. Rc1 c6) {did too much for me, so I
looked for sharper lines, in particular involving a pawn sac for
development with e4 and Bc4. But I didn't like to leave d4 hanging,
and Rd1 could allow Black to play ...Qa5+ in a couple moves, an
awkward check to deal with. So after a long think, I played O-O-O!?}


After looking at the position a while I would prefer to castle
kingside and use the half open c-file for a rook, possibly conducting
a minority attack: 11.e3 Bf6 12.Nf3 Kg7 13.Be2 and 14.O-O.


11.h4!?


11... c6 12. e4 h6


Even better 12...Bf6 13.h4 (not 13.Nf3 dxe4 and White loses a piece;
if 13.Nh3 fxe4 {raising possibility of ...Bxh3 and ...Bg5 after
unpinning the bishop} 14.g4 h6 and white has little compensation for
the pawn.) 13...fxe4 {freeing the the Bc8}. If 14.f3 h6 15.Nh3 exf3
16.gxf5 g5 17.Qg3 (17.hxg5 hxg5 18.Qg3 Rh4 and White doesn't have
enough for the pawn)


In that line after 12...Bf6 13.h4 fxe4 there is another option:
14.Ncxe4!? de4 15.Bc4

AT

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Old June 10th 04, 06:20 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default novelty in 5.Bg5 Grunfeld played against me at Chicago Open

On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 16:09:52 +0200, Antonio Torrecillas
wrote:

En/na Mike Ogush ha escrit:
[Event "Chicago Open, U2200 Section"]
[Site "Chicago"]
[Date "2004.05.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Caveney, Geoffrey"]
[Black "Movsisyan, Movses"]
[WhiteElo "2122"]
[BlackElo "2199"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7.
Nxg5 e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 f5 11. O-O-O

{I didn't think} (11. Nb5 Na6 12. Rc1 c6) {did too much for me, so I
looked for sharper lines, in particular involving a pawn sac for
development with e4 and Bc4. But I didn't like to leave d4 hanging,
and Rd1 could allow Black to play ...Qa5+ in a couple moves, an
awkward check to deal with. So after a long think, I played O-O-O!?}


After looking at the position a while I would prefer to castle
kingside and use the half open c-file for a rook, possibly conducting
a minority attack: 11.e3 Bf6 12.Nf3 Kg7 13.Be2 and 14.O-O.


11.h4!?


11... c6 12. e4 h6


Even better 12...Bf6 13.h4 (not 13.Nf3 dxe4 and White loses a piece;
if 13.Nh3 fxe4 {raising possibility of ...Bxh3 and ...Bg5 after
unpinning the bishop} 14.g4 h6 and white has little compensation for
the pawn.) 13...fxe4 {freeing the the Bc8}. If 14.f3 h6 15.Nh3 exf3
16.gxf5 g5 17.Qg3 (17.hxg5 hxg5 18.Qg3 Rh4 and White doesn't have
enough for the pawn)


In that line after 12...Bf6 13.h4 fxe4 there is another option:
14.Ncxe4!? de4 15.Bc4

AT


Antonio,

I looked at 14.Ncxe4 but after 14...dxe4 I only considered taking back
immediately with 15.Ngxe4. Bc4 is much better threatening Nf7 among
other things. At first I thought Black could survive via: 15...Qe7
16.Nxe4 Kg7 17.h5 h6 18.hxg6 Bg5 19.Nxg5 Qxg5 20.Rxh8 Kxh8 21.Rh1+
Kg7 22.Bd3 {with the the threat Rh7+ and g7} Be6 23.Rh7+ Kf6 24.Rxb7
Nd7 which reaches an ending where Black has a knight for 3 pawns.

But then I noticed White has the much better 16.Rhe1! Kg7 (Neither
16...Bf5 17.Nxe4 Kg7 18.Nd6 Qd7 19.Nf7 h6 20.Nxh8 +- nor 16...h6
17.Rxe4 hxg5 18.hxg5 Bf5 19.Rxe7 +- are any better) 17.Rxe4 and if
17...Qb4 18.Qc7+ Bd7 19.Ne6+ Kf7 20.Bb3 +- White will get the
sacrificed material with interest.



  #6   Report Post  
Old June 15th 04, 05:25 AM
Geoffrey Caveney
 
Posts: n/a
Default novelty in 5.Bg5 Grunfeld played against me at Chicago Open

[ = My original post]
[ = Mike Ogush's reply]

Mike, thank you for your analysis! I have a few comments about it:

[Event "Chicago Open, U2200 Section"]
[Site "Chicago"]
[Date "2004.05.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Caveney, Geoffrey"]
[Black "Movsisyan, Movses"]
[WhiteElo "2122"]
[BlackElo "2199"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7.
Nxg5 e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 f5
11. O-O-O

{I didn't think} (11. Nb5 Na6 12. Rc1 c6) {did too much for me, so I
looked for sharper lines, in particular involving a pawn sac for
development with e4 and Bc4. But I didn't like to leave d4 hanging,
and Rd1 could allow Black to play ...Qa5+ in a couple moves, an
awkward check to deal with. So after a long think, I played O-O-O!?}


After looking at the position a while I would prefer to castle
kingside and use the half open c-file for a rook, possibly conducting
a minority attack: 11.e3 Bf6 12.Nf3 Kg7 13.Be2 and 14.O-O.


I am convinced now that 11.O-O-O was just a mistaken, if interesting,
idea, but I don't like 11.e3 much either. In general, I think if White
wants to justify his unorthodox play in this variation -- giving Black
the two bishops and moving his queen three times in order to get play
with his queen and knights against Black's king on f8 -- he can't
count on a slow follow-up plan like e3, Be2, O-O. In your line, after
11.e3 Bf6 12.Nf3, I think Black has a strong follow-up in 12...g5!
13.Qg3 g4! I think Black stands better here already, but for a
theoretical refutation of the line for White, it is enough to note
that Black is very close to being able to force a draw by move
repetition if he so desires. For example if White tries 14.Ne5 Black
has 14...Bh4 15.Qf4 Bg5 16.Qg3 Bh4, etc. To avoid the draw White can
try 14.Nd2 but after 14...c6 (not 14...Bh4?? 15.Qe5 Bf6 16.Qxd5) Black
has the draw threat again (15.Be2 Bh4 16.Qe5 Bf6 17.Qf4 Bg5, etc.).
White can avoid that with 15.h4, but by this point I see nothing at
all attractive about this position for White.

I think Antonio Torrecillas' suggestion of 11.h4 is White's best try
against 10...f5. In fact after 11.e3 Bf6, I think White has to try
12.h4 instead of 12.Nf3.

c6 12. e4


even here I prefer e3. I don't like the sacrifice because in addition
to losing material, Black can force White pieces to bad squares. Also
now the queen and king are on the same diagonal so the threat of Bg5
skewering the queen to the king can arise.


True, the sacrifice doesn't work well at all. I still don't like 12.e3
for the same reasons as last move. 12.h4 is probably still the best
try -- but it probably would be better without either O-O-O or e3
before it.

h6 13. Nf3 g5 14. Qe3 fxe4 15. Nd2 Qf6

{Now White faces a major decision. I probably should have slightly
misplaced a knight with} (16. Nb3) {in order to retain the chance of
opening the position soon with enough active pieces to compensate for
my pawn down. Instead I decided to allow a queenless pawn-down
position, but one where I hoped to keep compensation with my lead in
development.}


16.Nb3 Qf4 and after queens are exchanges White's attack is gone and
he is left a pawn down.


You're right! White's position is simply bad at this point, but I
guess relatively best is 16.Ne2, which at least keeps the queens on.
It's rather absurd to suppose that White can have compensation for a
pawn with his pieces the way they are, but at least there's the chance
of playing the f2-f3 break, untangling the knights later, and giving
Black more opportunities to go wrong than after either 16.f3 or
16.Nb3.

16. f3 {?} Qxd4 17. Qxd4 Bxd4 18. fxe4 Bxc3 19. bxc3 Bg4 20. Re1 Rh7
21. h3 Bh5 21...Be6 22.exd5 Bxd5 23.c4 Bg8 24.Bd3 Rf7
22. g4 Bg6 23. exd5 cxd5 24. Bg2 Rd7 25. h4 {!?} gxh4 26.
Rxh4 Kg7 27. Re5

{My original idea} (27. Reh1 Nc6 28. Rxh6 Ne5) {pays too high a price
to regain the pawn, so I change plans and luckily get something out of
it.}

Na6

{Black probably felt} (Nc6 28. Rxd5) {simplified the position too much
to give him good winning chances.}


It seems to be that 27...Bf7 holds the pawn


Now that you mention it, I recall that during the game I had seen that
27...Bf7 28.g5! appears to give me good activity, real compensation
for the pawn. For example, 28...hxg5 29.Rxg5+ Kf6 30.Nf3! and all of
White's pieces are active (the bishop can go to h3) while none of
Black's are. And 28...h5 29.Bf3 wins the pawn back without giving
Black the piece activity of the above line 27.Reh1 Nc6 28.Rxh6 Ne5.

28. g5

{My best move of the game. Rook activity and counterplay on the g-file
is more important than winning back the pawn on d5.}

hxg5 29. Rxg5 Rc8 30. Kb2 d4 31. c4 Rc5 32. Rg3 {!} Rd6 33. Be4 Rb6+
34. Kc1 Re5

{I was expecting} (Nb4 {but White's pressure proves stronger than
Black's after} 35. Rhg4 Nxa2+ 36. Kc2 d3+ 37. Kxd3 {!} ) {While my
opponent was thinking about his move, I saw this line up to 36...d3+
but I did not see 37. Kxd3!, so after} (Nb4 {I was actually planning
to play the weaker} 35. a3)


Black can play 36...Rcc6 which leads to equality, which is better than
what could have happened.


You are right, 36...Rcc6!! is a beautiful move. A very elegant
position where Black's pinned bishop pins my bishop, allowing the rook
to defend it. Now if White pursues the piece with 37.Nf3, Rxc4+ will
at least draw -- it is White who will have to be careful.

So 35.a3 was the best move after all: after 35.a3 Na2+ 36.Kc2 Nc3!
(Black has to be careful not to let his knight get trapped), the play
may remain sharp for several moves but I believe it is a draw with
best play: 37.Bd3!? Kf7!? 38.Bxg6+ Rxg6 39.Rh7+ Kg8! (not 39...Kf6??
40.Rxc3! dxc3 41.Ne4+ and 42.Nxc5) 40.Rgh3!? Rg2. Or White can choose
the less complicated option 37.Bxg6 Rxg6 38.Rxg6+ Kxg6 39.Rxd4, which
leads to a drawn rook ending: 39...Na4 40.Rd7 (40.Ne4 Rc7 41.c5 Nxc5
42.Rc4 b6 leads nowhere for White) Nb6! 41.Rxb7 Nxc4 42.Nxc4 Rxc4+
43.Kb3. This has to be a draw for Black -- by comparison, the position
with White Kc5, Ra8, Pa6 and Black Kg7, Rf6 is drawn -- see the
analysis of the "Vancura position" on p.153 of Dvoretsky's Endgame
Manual. In fact, I believe that Black can use the method employed in
the Vancura position to get all the way to the very same position
reached in the analysis in Dvoretsky's book, for example: 43...Rf4
44.Rxa7 Rf3+ 45.Kb4 Rf4+ 46.Kc5 Rf5+ 47.Kd4 Rf3 48.a4 Rf4+ 49.Ke5 Rb4
50.a5 Rb5+ 51.Kd6 Rf5 52.a6 Rf6+ 53.Kc7 Re6 54.Kb7 Re7+ 55.Kb6 Re6+
56.Kc5 Rf6. 57.Ra8 Kg7 = (58.Kb5 Rf5+; 58.a7 Ra6).

35. Nf3 Ree6 36. Nxd4 Rf6 37. Rhg4


Here White missed a tactical shot, which wins: 37.Nf5+ Kf8 (37...Kf7
38.Bd5+ Rfe6 39.Nd4 Nc7 40.Nxe6 Nxe6 41.Rh6 Bf5 42.Rf3+- White will be
up a piece; 37...Rxf5 38.Bxf5 Rf6 39.Rh5 Kf7 40.Bxg6+ Rxg6 41.Rh7+ Kf6
42.Rxg6+ Kxg6 43.Rxb7 +-; 37...Kg8 38.Bd5+ Rbe6 39.Nd4 Nc7 40.Nxe6
Nxe6 41.Re4 Kf7 42.Rxe6 Rxe6 43.Bxe6 +-) 38.Rh8+ Kf7 39.Bd5+ Rbe6
40.Nxe6+ Kxe6 41.Nd4+ Ke5 42.Rd8 and white has won the exchange


Indeed! But you don't mention the beautiful, amazing mating variation
which is the key to the whole thing: 37.Nf5+! Kf7 38.Bd5+! (during the
game, in time pressure of under 90 seconds to make my last four moves,
I looked at 37.Nf5+ Kf7 but I did not even notice the possibility of
38.Bd5+) Ke8 (when I first read your analysis above, my first thought
was, "Yes, but what does White have after 38...Ke8?") 39.Re3+! Kd8
40.Rh8+ Kc7 41.Re7 mate!! An amazing mating position! Black's pieces
are entirely unable to interpose effectively to any of the series of
checks, and for the crowning touch the rook on b6 blocks his own
king's last hope for an escape route. To a variation and position like
that, all I can say is wow, chess is beautiful.

Nc5 38. Bxg6 Rxg6 39. Nf5+ Kf7 40. Rxg6 Rxg6 41. Rxg6 Kxg6

{and a draw was soon agreed:}

42. Nd4 Kf6 43. Kc2 Ke5 44. Kc3 {!} a6 45. Nb3 Kd6 46. Kb4 Nd3+ 47.
Kc3 Ne5 48. Na5 Kc7 49. Nb3 Kb6 1/2-1/2

  #7   Report Post  
Old June 16th 04, 10:07 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default novelty in 5.Bg5 Grunfeld played against me at Chicago Open

On 14 Jun 2004 21:25:02 -0700, (Geoffrey Caveney)
wrote:

[ = My original post]
[ = Mike Ogush's reply]

Mike, thank you for your analysis! I have a few comments about it:

[Event "Chicago Open, U2200 Section"]
[Site "Chicago"]
[Date "2004.05.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Caveney, Geoffrey"]
[Black "Movsisyan, Movses"]
[WhiteElo "2122"]
[BlackElo "2199"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d5 5. Bg5 Ne4 6. cxd5 Nxg5 7.
Nxg5 e6 8. Qd2 exd5 9. Qe3+ Kf8 10. Qf4 f5
11. O-O-O

{I didn't think} (11. Nb5 Na6 12. Rc1 c6) {did too much for me, so I
looked for sharper lines, in particular involving a pawn sac for
development with e4 and Bc4. But I didn't like to leave d4 hanging,
and Rd1 could allow Black to play ...Qa5+ in a couple moves, an
awkward check to deal with. So after a long think, I played O-O-O!?}


After looking at the position a while I would prefer to castle
kingside and use the half open c-file for a rook, possibly conducting
a minority attack: 11.e3 Bf6 12.Nf3 Kg7 13.Be2 and 14.O-O.


I am convinced now that 11.O-O-O was just a mistaken, if interesting,
idea, but I don't like 11.e3 much either. In general, I think if White
wants to justify his unorthodox play in this variation -- giving Black
the two bishops and moving his queen three times in order to get play
with his queen and knights against Black's king on f8 -- he can't
count on a slow follow-up plan like e3, Be2, O-O. In your line, after
11.e3 Bf6 12.Nf3, I think Black has a strong follow-up in 12...g5!
13.Qg3 g4! I think Black stands better here already, but for a
theoretical refutation of the line for White, it is enough to note
that Black is very close to being able to force a draw by move
repetition if he so desires. For example if White tries 14.Ne5 Black
has 14...Bh4 15.Qf4 Bg5 16.Qg3 Bh4, etc. To avoid the draw White can
try 14.Nd2 but after 14...c6 (not 14...Bh4?? 15.Qe5 Bf6 16.Qxd5) Black
has the draw threat again (15.Be2 Bh4 16.Qe5 Bf6 17.Qf4 Bg5, etc.).
White can avoid that with 15.h4, but by this point I see nothing at
all attractive about this position for White.


I think white is better because Black has advanced the f- and g-pawns
so far, both depriving his king of pawn cover and making it hard to
defend the pawns because they are so advanced, To avoid the
perpetual bisjhop attacking the queen I would play 15.h3 giving the
queen a flight square as well as preparing to break up Black's
advanced pawns. After an exchange on g4 (hxg4 fxg4 a subsequent O-O-O
and e4 by White is more effective than in the game.

I think Antonio Torrecillas' suggestion of 11.h4 is White's best try
against 10...f5. In fact after 11.e3 Bf6, I think White has to try
12.h4 instead of 12.Nf3.

The above said, 11.h4 is also a fine move. In games that reach the
position after White's 10th where Black plays 10...Bf6 the most common
reply by White is 11.h4. In may of these games White also
subsequently plays e3. I wasn't objecting to O-O-O per se as much as
suggesting that there may be better things for White to do and that it
isn't clear yet whether White which side White should castle on.

c6 12. e4


even here I prefer e3. I don't like the sacrifice because in addition
to losing material, Black can force White pieces to bad squares. Also
now the queen and king are on the same diagonal so the threat of Bg5
skewering the queen to the king can arise.


True, the sacrifice doesn't work well at all. I still don't like 12.e3
for the same reasons as last move. 12.h4 is probably still the best
try -- but it probably would be better without either O-O-O or e3
before it.

h6 13. Nf3 g5 14. Qe3 fxe4 15. Nd2 Qf6

{Now White faces a major decision. I probably should have slightly
misplaced a knight with} (16. Nb3) {in order to retain the chance of
opening the position soon with enough active pieces to compensate for
my pawn down. Instead I decided to allow a queenless pawn-down
position, but one where I hoped to keep compensation with my lead in
development.}


16.Nb3 Qf4 and after queens are exchanges White's attack is gone and
he is left a pawn down.


You're right! White's position is simply bad at this point, but I
guess relatively best is 16.Ne2, which at least keeps the queens on.
It's rather absurd to suppose that White can have compensation for a
pawn with his pieces the way they are, but at least there's the chance
of playing the f2-f3 break, untangling the knights later, and giving
Black more opportunities to go wrong than after either 16.f3 or
16.Nb3.


Yes after 16.Ne2 Kf7 {to activate the king's rook} 17.h4 g4 18.f3 exf3
19.gxf3 Re8 20.Qb3 Re7 21.Ne4 Qe6 22.Nf4 Qe6 23.Nh5 Bh8 24.Bd3 has
full compensation for the material defeicit. I realize that the above
variation is not forced for Black, but White's general idea of
removing all of the pawns offereing cover for the Black king is a good
one.

16. f3 {?} Qxd4 17. Qxd4 Bxd4 18. fxe4 Bxc3


Some more notes on the orginal game: This where Black starts
frittering away his advanatage. Better was 18...Be6 19.exd5 cxd5
20.Nf3 {and now} Bxc3 21.bxc3 Nc6

19. bxc3 Bg4 20. Re1 Rh7
21. h3 Bh5 21...Be6 22.exd5 Bxd5 23.c4 Bg8 24.Bd3 Rf7
22. g4 Bg6 23. exd5 cxd5 24. Bg2 Rd7 25. h4 {!?} gxh4 26.
Rxh4 Kg7 27. Re5

{My original idea} (27. Reh1 Nc6 28. Rxh6 Ne5) {pays too high a price
to regain the pawn, so I change plans and luckily get something out of
it.}

Na6

{Black probably felt} (Nc6 28. Rxd5) {simplified the position too much
to give him good winning chances.}


It seems to be that 27...Bf7 holds the pawn


Now that you mention it, I recall that during the game I had seen that
27...Bf7 28.g5! appears to give me good activity, real compensation
for the pawn. For example, 28...hxg5 29.Rxg5+ Kf6 30.Nf3! and all of
White's pieces are active (the bishop can go to h3) while none of
Black's are. And 28...h5 29.Bf3 wins the pawn back without giving
Black the piece activity of the above line 27.Reh1 Nc6 28.Rxh6 Ne5.


28...h5 29.Bf3! does not lose the pawn because Black can play 29...Nc6
{attacking the rook} 30.Re2 Rh8 31.Reh2 Ne5 and if 32.Bxh5 Bxh5
33.Rxh5 Rxh5 34.Rxh5 Kg6

28. g5

{My best move of the game. Rook activity and counterplay on the g-file
is more important than winning back the pawn on d5.}

hxg5 29. Rxg5 Rc8 30. Kb2 d4 31. c4 Rc5 32. Rg3 {!} Rd6 33. Be4 Rb6+
34. Kc1 Re5

{I was expecting} (Nb4 {but White's pressure proves stronger than
Black's after} 35. Rhg4 Nxa2+ 36. Kc2 d3+ 37. Kxd3 {!} ) {While my
opponent was thinking about his move, I saw this line up to 36...d3+
but I did not see 37. Kxd3!, so after} (Nb4 {I was actually planning
to play the weaker} 35. a3)


Black can play 36...Rcc6 which leads to equality, which is better than
what could have happened.


You are right, 36...Rcc6!! is a beautiful move. A very elegant
position where Black's pinned bishop pins my bishop, allowing the rook
to defend it. Now if White pursues the piece with 37.Nf3, Rxc4+ will
at least draw -- it is White who will have to be careful.

So 35.a3 was the best move after all: after 35.a3 Na2+ 36.Kc2 Nc3!
(Black has to be careful not to let his knight get trapped), the play
may remain sharp for several moves but I believe it is a draw with
best play: 37.Bd3!? Kf7!?


37...Kf7? 38.Rf4+ Kg7 39.Rxd4
if 39...Ne2 40.Rxg6+ Rxg6 41.Bxe2 and White has the advantage.
if 39...Na4 40.Bxg6 Rxg6 41.Rd7+ Kh6 42.Rxg6+ Kxg6 43.Rxb7 and White
has the advantage
However, I am not sure if White has enough advantage to win.

38.Bxg6+ Rxg6 39.Rh7+ Kg8! (not 39...Kf6??
40.Rxc3! dxc3 41.Ne4+ and 42.Nxc5) 40.Rgh3!? Rg2. Or White can choose
the less complicated option 37.Bxg6 Rxg6 38.Rxg6+ Kxg6 39.Rxd4, which
leads to a drawn rook ending: 39...Na4 40.Rd7 (40.Ne4 Rc7 41.c5 Nxc5
42.Rc4 b6 leads nowhere for White) Nb6! 41.Rxb7 Nxc4 42.Nxc4 Rxc4+
43.Kb3. This has to be a draw for Black -- by comparison, the position
with White Kc5, Ra8, Pa6 and Black Kg7, Rf6 is drawn -- see the
analysis of the "Vancura position" on p.153 of Dvoretsky's Endgame
Manual. In fact, I believe that Black can use the method employed in
the Vancura position to get all the way to the very same position
reached in the analysis in Dvoretsky's book, for example: 43...Rf4
44.Rxa7 Rf3+ 45.Kb4 Rf4+ 46.Kc5 Rf5+ 47.Kd4 Rf3 48.a4 Rf4+ 49.Ke5 Rb4
50.a5 Rb5+ 51.Kd6 Rf5 52.a6 Rf6+ 53.Kc7 Re6 54.Kb7 Re7+ 55.Kb6 Re6+
56.Kc5 Rf6. 57.Ra8 Kg7 = (58.Kb5 Rf5+; 58.a7 Ra6).

35. Nf3 Ree6 36. Nxd4 Rf6 37. Rhg4


Here White missed a tactical shot, which wins: 37.Nf5+ Kf8 (37...Kf7
38.Bd5+ Rfe6 39.Nd4 Nc7 40.Nxe6 Nxe6 41.Rh6 Bf5 42.Rf3+- White will be
up a piece; 37...Rxf5 38.Bxf5 Rf6 39.Rh5 Kf7 40.Bxg6+ Rxg6 41.Rh7+ Kf6
42.Rxg6+ Kxg6 43.Rxb7 +-; 37...Kg8 38.Bd5+ Rbe6 39.Nd4 Nc7 40.Nxe6
Nxe6 41.Re4 Kf7 42.Rxe6 Rxe6 43.Bxe6 +-) 38.Rh8+ Kf7 39.Bd5+ Rbe6
40.Nxe6+ Kxe6 41.Nd4+ Ke5 42.Rd8 and white has won the exchange


Indeed! But you don't mention the beautiful, amazing mating variation
which is the key to the whole thing: 37.Nf5+! Kf7 38.Bd5+! (during the
game, in time pressure of under 90 seconds to make my last four moves,
I looked at 37.Nf5+ Kf7 but I did not even notice the possibility of
38.Bd5+) Ke8 (when I first read your analysis above, my first thought
was, "Yes, but what does White have after 38...Ke8?") 39.Re3+! Kd8
40.Rh8+ Kc7 41.Re7 mate!! An amazing mating position! Black's pieces
are entirely unable to interpose effectively to any of the series of
checks, and for the crowning touch the rook on b6 blocks his own
king's last hope for an escape route. To a variation and position like
that, all I can say is wow, chess is beautiful.

Nc5 38. Bxg6 Rxg6 39. Nf5+ Kf7 40. Rxg6 Rxg6 41. Rxg6 Kxg6

{and a draw was soon agreed:}

42. Nd4 Kf6 43. Kc2 Ke5 44. Kc3 {!} a6 45. Nb3 Kd6 46. Kb4 Nd3+ 47.
Kc3 Ne5 48. Na5 Kc7 49. Nb3 Kb6 1/2-1/2


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