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Old June 17th 04, 01:19 PM
Kim
 
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Default a little help please cont'd

heres the match:
1. e4 e5 2. d4 d6 3. Nf3 Na6 4. d5 Nf6 5. Nc3 g5 6. Bb5+ Bd7 7. a4 c6
8. dxc6 bxc6 9. Bxa6 Qb6 10. Qd3 Bc8 11. Bxg5 Qxb2 12. Rb1 Qa3 13.
Bxf6 Rg8 14. O-O d5 15. exd5 Qc5 16. dxc6 Qxc6 17. Qd8# 1-0

my thoughts were (based on what ive read, or heard) to control the ctr
of the board, bring out my knight(s) and bishops first not to waste
moves by needlessy moving pieces around. by move 13 i had developed a
specific plan to mate. it looks to me like i may have been able to
win sooner if i had sacrifced my by playing Ne5 but i guess thats a
beginners mistake not knowing when or being reluctant to make
sacrifices.

thanks to all for their comments, analysis etc.
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Old June 18th 04, 08:48 AM
Chess Player
 
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Default a little help please cont'd

"Kim" wrote in message
m...
heres the match:
1. e4 e5 2. d4 d6 3. Nf3 Na6 4. d5 Nf6 5. Nc3 g5 6. Bb5+ Bd7 7. a4 c6
8. dxc6 bxc6 9. Bxa6 Qb6 10. Qd3 Bc8 11. Bxg5 Qxb2 12. Rb1 Qa3 13.
Bxf6 Rg8 14. O-O d5 15. exd5 Qc5 16. dxc6 Qxc6 17. Qd8# 1-0



Hi Kim,

It's impossible to judge your skill based on this game because your opponent
doesn't have a clue. From the moves he/she made, I'm guessing your opponent
barely knows how the pieces move.
Find some tougher opponents and post a few more games on here. I'll give
you a hint - it's better to post a game that you lost and don't know why you
lost than it is to show us a game you won. It's a humbling experience to
lose, but you can learn so much more about your game by showing games in
which you've lost.
Before you give us a game, analyze it yourself and think about what you
could have done better, or at least find out where you went wrong if you
can.
Brian


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Old June 18th 04, 12:32 PM
Chess Player
 
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Default a little help please cont'd

snip
yes im white sorry for not making that clear. what im looking for
is feedback on what i did right but more importantly what i did wrong
or could have done better. thanks


Why change anything about the way you played - you won the game! That's the
object, right? This is why you would do yourself a favor to lose some games
and learn from them instead of a won game. Just my opinion.




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Old June 18th 04, 10:35 PM
Mike Ogush
 
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Default a little help please cont'd

On 17 Jun 2004 05:19:15 -0700, (Kim) wrote:

heres the match:
1. e4 e5 2. d4 d6 3. Nf3 Na6 4. d5 Nf6 5. Nc3 g5 6. Bb5+ Bd7 7. a4 c6
8. dxc6 bxc6 9. Bxa6 Qb6 10. Qd3 Bc8 11. Bxg5 Qxb2 12. Rb1 Qa3 13.
Bxf6 Rg8 14. O-O d5 15. exd5 Qc5 16. dxc6 Qxc6 17. Qd8# 1-0

my thoughts were (based on what ive read, or heard) to control the ctr
of the board, bring out my knight(s) and bishops first not to waste
moves by needlessy moving pieces around. by move 13 i had developed a
specific plan to mate. it looks to me like i may have been able to
win sooner if i had sacrifced my by playing Ne5 but i guess thats a
beginners mistake not knowing when or being reluctant to make
sacrifices.

thanks to all for their comments, analysis etc.


Kim,

My advice to you (assuming you played white) is to look at each new
position that arises in the game and see if you can either win
material directly or win it via a 2-2 move combination:

4.Bxa6 bxa6 5.dxe5 or 4.dxe5 wins a pawn since you are attacking the
e5 pawn with both your d4-pawn and the Nf3. The former variation is
better since it also creates additional weaknesses in the doubled,
isolated a-pawns. The other reason for taking the Na6 is that your
opponent could have played Nc5 later and reduced white's plus, e.g.
4...Nc5 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Bg5 Be7 and if 7.Bb5+ Ncd7 =.

7.Bxa6 bxa6 8.Bxg5 wins a pawn. After 7.a4 Black could have played
7...g4 8.Nd2 Nb4 and white would only have a small admantage.

11.Bxg5 was a mistake. Yes it does win a pawn, but Black could have
recovered a piece with 11...Bxa6 12.Qd2 Nd7. Better was 11.Bxc8 Rxc8
12.Bxg5.

At move 13 White have exchanged at c8: 13.Bxc8 Rxc8 14.Nxf6 when white
is up two pieces. As played in the game Black could have played
13...Bxa6 14.Qxa6 Qxc3+ 15.Kd1 Rg8 and been down only one piece.

At move 14 White does have a "fancy" sacrifice 14.Nxe5 Bxa6 (14...dxe5
15.Qd8#) 15.Nb5 Bxb5 (or 15...cxb5) (15...Qxd3 15.Nc7#) 16.Qxa3 dxe5
17.Qc3 and white has a queen and pawn for a bishop and still maintains
a strong attack. However, White was already up a two knights before
14.Nxe5 and it might be more practical (if somewhat more pedestrian)
to just trade down material.: 14.Bxc8 Rxc8 15.O-O virtually guarantees
the win. [Aside: You may want to look at Dan Heisman's Novice Nook
article on what to do when you are winning. See the archive at
www.chesscafe.com.]

14.O-O also easily wins, but one question I have for you Kim is: when
you played 14.O-O did you see beyond the loss of the knight in the
variation 14...Bxa6 15.Qxa6 Qxc3 and notice that 16.Qb7! would lead to
a quick mate?

Mike Ogush
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