Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old June 17th 04, 02:58 PM
Chris Tilling
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysing "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch


Hello everyone,

Have you ever read a detailed analysis in, say, a Kasparov or Nunn Chess
book and thought, " I'd love to understand all of this!" Well, I'm on a
mission to do just that with one of my most wonderfully annotated game
collection. But, I'm finding that I'm struggling in places. Can you help me
out?

Actually, it is only one of the books that I am presently trying to work my
way through. It is called "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch. So far,
it is really impressive and very instructive. I would highly recommend this
book. However, some of his analysis I simply do not understand and so I
thought I would put the question to you folks. I will probably have more
questions in the future and so I will call this question set one!

The game is between Chigorin as white and the great Lasker and goes:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 (this I can all understand!!) Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d3(no
Greco Gambit today) d6 6.Nbd2 a6 7.h3 Ba7 8.Bb3 Nd7 9.Nf1 Nc5 10.Bc2 d5
........ and now the problem position and analysis:

Chigorin played 11.Qe2 which Crouch marks with ?!

I understand why Crouch was suspicious of this move, and the move he
recommends instead (11.exd5) does have immediate logical appeal -- in that
white develops his Knight on f1 with time (attacking the Queen). So far so
good.

So what is my poblem? Crouch's analysis maintains that the best line is as
follows (the questions follow):

11.exd5 Qxd5 12.d4! exd4 13.cxd4 Ne4 (or the knight blocks the queens
retreat to d8) 14.Ne3 Qa5+ 15.Ke2! (Crouch's marking) f5 (maintaining the
Knight's pressure on d2) 16.Bb3±

Firstly, what on earth is this 15.Ke2? Crouch gives this an "!". Why? I just
don't understand this. I'm pretty confident that the problem lies with my
lack of understanding and not with international Master Crouch! But what to
make of Crouch's end-position and evaluation "±"? White's minor piece
control of the centre is impressive, but before he can do much active in the
middle he will probably need to get his King out of the line of fire -- or
Black will have probable counterplay, especially once his rooks start
glaring down the middle files. Black, on the other hand, has to now castle
long. But this is easily done, Bd7 followed by O-O-O and this gives black
some tactical chances against white's centre pawn.

So, it could go from Crouch's end-position after 16.Bb3 ... Bd7 17.Re1 (with
the idea of getting the King behind the kingside pawns) O-O-O 18. Kf1 and
then the bone crushing 18 ... Nxd4! looks great. Surely White is worse here.
But what else was he to do. What have I missed? If this analysis is correct
then surely white has to leave his King in the centre of the board, at least
for a while, and then black can point his rooks at the White King!

Let me summarise my questions. From Crouch's end-position (16.Bb3) how is
one to understand the evaluation "±"? What is good about white's position
that the position of his King doesn't spoil? What scheme has white to
capitalise on his piece control of the centre that doesn't endanger his own
King? OR, have I just got the whole idea wrong here and missed some really
obvious answer?

Help will be really appreciated, cos I really want to understand what Crouch
is saying.

Thanks for any help,

Chris


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.706 / Virus Database: 462 - Release Date: 14/06/2004


  #2   Report Post  
Old June 17th 04, 10:01 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysing "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch

On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 15:58:19 +0200, "Chris Tilling"
wrote:


Hello everyone,

Have you ever read a detailed analysis in, say, a Kasparov or Nunn Chess
book and thought, " I'd love to understand all of this!" Well, I'm on a
mission to do just that with one of my most wonderfully annotated game
collection. But, I'm finding that I'm struggling in places. Can you help me
out?

Actually, it is only one of the books that I am presently trying to work my
way through. It is called "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch. So far,
it is really impressive and very instructive. I would highly recommend this
book. However, some of his analysis I simply do not understand and so I
thought I would put the question to you folks. I will probably have more
questions in the future and so I will call this question set one!

The game is between Chigorin as white and the great Lasker and goes:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 (this I can all understand!!) Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d3(no
Greco Gambit today) d6 6.Nbd2 a6 7.h3 Ba7 8.Bb3 Nd7 9.Nf1 Nc5 10.Bc2 d5
....... and now the problem position and analysis:

Chigorin played 11.Qe2 which Crouch marks with ?!

I understand why Crouch was suspicious of this move, and the move he
recommends instead (11.exd5) does have immediate logical appeal -- in that
white develops his Knight on f1 with time (attacking the Queen). So far so
good.

So what is my poblem? Crouch's analysis maintains that the best line is as
follows (the questions follow):

11.exd5 Qxd5 12.d4! exd4 13.cxd4 Ne4 (or the knight blocks the queens
retreat to d8) 14.Ne3 Qa5+ 15.Ke2! (Crouch's marking) f5 (maintaining the
Knight's pressure on d2) 16.Bb3±

Firstly, what on earth is this 15.Ke2? Crouch gives this an "!". Why? I just
don't understand this. I'm pretty confident that the problem lies with my
lack of understanding and not with international Master Crouch! But what to
make of Crouch's end-position and evaluation "±"? White's minor piece
control of the centre is impressive, but before he can do much active in the
middle he will probably need to get his King out of the line of fire -- or
Black will have probable counterplay, especially once his rooks start
glaring down the middle files. Black, on the other hand, has to now castle
long. But this is easily done, Bd7 followed by O-O-O and this gives black
some tactical chances against white's centre pawn.

So, it could go from Crouch's end-position after 16.Bb3 ... Bd7 17.Re1 (with
the idea of getting the King behind the kingside pawns) O-O-O 18. Kf1 and
then the bone crushing 18 ... Nxd4! looks great. Surely White is worse here.
But what else was he to do. What have I missed? If this analysis is correct
then surely white has to leave his King in the centre of the board, at least
for a while, and then black can point his rooks at the White King!

Let me summarise my questions. From Crouch's end-position (16.Bb3) how is
one to understand the evaluation "±"? What is good about white's position
that the position of his King doesn't spoil? What scheme has white to
capitalise on his piece control of the centre that doesn't endanger his own
King? OR, have I just got the whole idea wrong here and missed some really
obvious answer?

Help will be really appreciated, cos I really want to understand what Crouch
is saying.

Thanks for any help,

Chris


After 16.Bb3 Bd7 17.Re1 O-O-O White has a zwischenzug 18.Nc4 which
blocks a possible ...Bb5 from beig a checking move and gains a tempo
by attacking the queen. If 18...Nxd4 19.Nxd4 Bb5 20.Nxb5 Qxb5 21.Qc2
+/- Black doesn't have enough compensation for the piece. After
18...Qb4 19.Kf1 Black cannot play 19...Nd4 anymore but 19...Rhe8
seems sufficient to give Black at least a small advantage, e.g. 20.Be3
g5 21.Nxg5 Nxd4

I don't know what Crouch sees in the position that warrants a +/-
evaluation.

One thing to note is that White could have played 14.Qe2 instead of
Ne3 and after 14...f5 15.Ne3 Qb5 (if 15...Qa5+ 16.Bd2) 16.Qxb5 axb5
17.Nd5 Kd8 18.Bf4 Nd6 19.Bg5+ Kd7 20.Be3 +/=

Mike Ogush
  #3   Report Post  
Old June 18th 04, 01:06 PM
Claus-Jürgen Heigl
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysing "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch

Mike Ogush wrote:

On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 15:58:19 +0200, "Chris Tilling"
wrote:


Hello everyone,
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 (this I can all understand!!) Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d3(no
Greco Gambit today) d6 6.Nbd2 a6 7.h3 Ba7 8.Bb3 Nd7 9.Nf1 Nc5 10.Bc2 d5
....... and now the problem position and analysis:

So what is my poblem? Crouch's analysis maintains that the best line is as
follows (the questions follow):

11.exd5 Qxd5 12.d4! exd4 13.cxd4 Ne4 (or the knight blocks the queens
retreat to d8) 14.Ne3 Qa5+ 15.Ke2! (Crouch's marking) f5 (maintaining the
Knight's pressure on d2) 16.Bb3±


I'm not so hot about Ke2 either. Obviously the idea is to get the rook
h1 into play before the king moves to safety. The alternative 15. Nd2
runs into trouble after 15...Nd6 when d4 hangs. 15. Kf1 shuts out the
rook but looks ok to me after 15...Nf6 16. Bd2 Qh5 17. Bc3 0-0 18.
Ne5. White has active play in the center.

After 15. Ke2 simply 15...Nf6 keeps it simple and is a good
alternative to f5. For example 16. Re1 0-0 17. Kf1 Rd8 and the d-pawn
looks doomed. 18. d5 Nb4 or Ne7 doesn't relieve the situation. Neither
does 18. Bd2 Qb5+. If Black can reach this kind of position with
natural, not hard to come by moves then I'd say the whole Ke2 idea is
a failure.

After 16.Bb3 Bd7 17.Re1 O-O-O White has a zwischenzug 18.Nc4 which
blocks a possible ...Bb5 from beig a checking move and gains a tempo
by attacking the queen. After
18...Qb4 19.Kf1 Black cannot play 19...Nd4 anymore but 19...Rhe8
seems sufficient to give Black at least a small advantage, e.g. 20.Be3
g5 21.Nxg5 Nxd4


I suggest 18...Qb5 as an improvement for Black. The idea is to provoke
a4 when the Bb3 is only defended by the queen which makes Nxd4 ideas
once again valid. The pin also sets up threats against the Nc4 (Be6).

19. Kf1 Be6 20. Qe2 Nxd4 is definitely advantageous to Black.
19. Be3 f4 20. Bxf4 Nxd4 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. Kf1 Bc6 23. Qg4+ Kb8 24.
Ba2 Nxf2 and Black wins.
19. a4 Qb4 20. Be3 (20. Kf1 Nxd4) 20...f4 21. Bxf4 Bxd4 (threat Nxf2)
22. Nxd4 Nxd4+ 23. Kf1 Bf5 with overwhelming game for Black.

One thing to note is that White could have played 14.Qe2 instead of
Ne3 and after 14...f5 15.Ne3 Qb5 (if 15...Qa5+ 16.Bd2) 16.Qxb5 axb5
17.Nd5 Kd8 18.Bf4 Nd6 19.Bg5+ Kd7 20.Be3 +/=


Here 15...Qd6 is an improvement over Qb5. 16. 0-0 0-0 pses no problems
to Black. If 16. Nxf5 so 16...Bxf5 17. Bxe4 0-0 and I think Black has
compensation for the pawn because of superior development, the
half-open f-file and the weakness of the d-pawn. In fact I'm not so
sure if White can hold the pawn.

For example 18. Bxf5 Rxf5 19. Be3 Qe6 20. a3 (preparing the Ra1 to
move, if 20. Qd2 Raf8 prepares the strong exchange sacrifice on f3)
20...Rd8 21. Rd1 (or 21. Rc1 Rfd5) 21...Rfd5 22. Rd2 Qf6.

If 18. Qc4+ Be6 19. Qc2 (better is 19. d5 Rd8 20. 0-0 (20. Bxh7+? Kxh7
21. Ng5+ Kg8 22. Nxe6 Bxf2+ 23. Kf1 Bg3+ 24. Nxf8 Qxf8+ 25. Bf4 Ne5
26. Qe4 Bxf4 with a winning attack) 20...Bxd5 =) 19...Nxd4 20. Nxd4
Bxd4 21. Bxh7+ Kh8 22. 0-0 Rxf2 23. Rxf2 Rf8.

Claus-Juergen
  #4   Report Post  
Old June 18th 04, 10:53 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysing "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch

On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 14:06:18 +0200, =?iso-8859-1?Q?Claus=2DJ=FCrgen?=
Heigl wrote:

Mike Ogush wrote:

On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 15:58:19 +0200, "Chris Tilling"
wrote:


Hello everyone,
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 (this I can all understand!!) Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d3(no
Greco Gambit today) d6 6.Nbd2 a6 7.h3 Ba7 8.Bb3 Nd7 9.Nf1 Nc5 10.Bc2 d5
....... and now the problem position and analysis:

So what is my poblem? Crouch's analysis maintains that the best line is as
follows (the questions follow):

11.exd5 Qxd5 12.d4! exd4 13.cxd4 Ne4 (or the knight blocks the queens
retreat to d8) 14.Ne3 Qa5+ 15.Ke2! (Crouch's marking) f5 (maintaining the
Knight's pressure on d2) 16.Bb3±


I'm not so hot about Ke2 either. Obviously the idea is to get the rook
h1 into play before the king moves to safety. The alternative 15. Nd2
runs into trouble after 15...Nd6 when d4 hangs. 15. Kf1 shuts out the
rook but looks ok to me after 15...Nf6 16. Bd2 Qh5 17. Bc3 0-0 18.
Ne5. White has active play in the center.

After 15. Ke2 simply 15...Nf6 keeps it simple and is a good
alternative to f5. For example 16. Re1 0-0 17. Kf1 Rd8 and the d-pawn
looks doomed. 18. d5 Nb4 or Ne7 doesn't relieve the situation. Neither
does 18. Bd2 Qb5+. If Black can reach this kind of position with
natural, not hard to come by moves then I'd say the whole Ke2 idea is
a failure.

After 16.Bb3 Bd7 17.Re1 O-O-O White has a zwischenzug 18.Nc4 which
blocks a possible ...Bb5 from beig a checking move and gains a tempo
by attacking the queen. After
18...Qb4 19.Kf1 Black cannot play 19...Nd4 anymore but 19...Rhe8
seems sufficient to give Black at least a small advantage, e.g. 20.Be3
g5 21.Nxg5 Nxd4


I suggest 18...Qb5 as an improvement for Black. The idea is to provoke
a4 when the Bb3 is only defended by the queen which makes Nxd4 ideas
once again valid. The pin also sets up threats against the Nc4 (Be6).

19. Kf1 Be6 20. Qe2 Nxd4 is definitely advantageous to Black.
19. Be3 f4 20. Bxf4 Nxd4 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. Kf1 Bc6 23. Qg4+ Kb8 24.
Ba2 Nxf2 and Black wins.
19. a4 Qb4 20. Be3 (20. Kf1 Nxd4)


After 20.Kf1 Nxd4 reduces Black's advantage. After 21.Nxd4 Bxd4
22.Qxd4 Qxb3 23.Na5 Qb6 (23...Qc2 24.Qa7 at least +/=) 24.Qxb6 cxb6
25.Nc4 b5 26.Nb6+ Kc7 27.Nxd7 and 28.axb5. Black will still have the
pawn plus, but the extra pawn is part of the doubled isolated b-pawns
and Black's king is still not very secure. I would evaluate this as
equal. However after 20.Kf1 Rhe8 be better than the similar position
where the a-pawn has not moved since the queen is tied to the defense
of the Bb3.

20...f4 21. Bxf4 Bxd4 (threat Nxf2)
22. Nxd4 Nxd4+ 23. Kf1 Bf5 with overwhelming game for Black.

One thing to note is that White could have played 14.Qe2 instead of
Ne3 and after 14...f5 15.Ne3 Qb5 (if 15...Qa5+ 16.Bd2) 16.Qxb5 axb5
17.Nd5 Kd8 18.Bf4 Nd6 19.Bg5+ Kd7 20.Be3 +/=


Here 15...Qd6 is an improvement over Qb5. 16. 0-0 0-0 pses no problems
to Black. If 16. Nxf5 so 16...Bxf5 17. Bxe4 0-0 and I think Black has
compensation for the pawn because of superior development, the
half-open f-file and the weakness of the d-pawn. In fact I'm not so
sure if White can hold the pawn.

For example 18. Bxf5 Rxf5 19. Be3 Qe6 20. a3 (preparing the Ra1 to
move, if 20. Qd2 Raf8 prepares the strong exchange sacrifice on f3)
20...Rd8 21. Rd1 (or 21. Rc1 Rfd5) 21...Rfd5 22. Rd2 Qf6.

If 18. Qc4+ Be6 19. Qc2 (better is 19. d5 Rd8 20. 0-0 (20. Bxh7+? Kxh7
21. Ng5+ Kg8 22. Nxe6 Bxf2+ 23. Kf1 Bg3+ 24. Nxf8 Qxf8+ 25. Bf4 Ne5
26. Qe4 Bxf4 with a winning attack) 20...Bxd5 =) 19...Nxd4 20. Nxd4
Bxd4 21. Bxh7+ Kh8 22. 0-0 Rxf2 23. Rxf2 Rf8.

Claus-Juergen


  #5   Report Post  
Old June 20th 04, 10:52 PM
Chris Tilling
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysing "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch

For a summary and some new ideas, follow this link:

http://www.christilling.de/Defence/chigorinlasker.htm

I have included both of your analysis. Thanks very much I found your
comments very helpful and instructive.


"Mike Ogush" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 14:06:18 +0200, =?iso-8859-1?Q?Claus=2DJ=FCrgen?=
Heigl wrote:

Mike Ogush wrote:

On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 15:58:19 +0200, "Chris Tilling"
wrote:


Hello everyone,
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 (this I can all understand!!) Bc5 4.c3 Nf6

5.d3(no
Greco Gambit today) d6 6.Nbd2 a6 7.h3 Ba7 8.Bb3 Nd7 9.Nf1 Nc5 10.Bc2

d5
....... and now the problem position and analysis:

So what is my poblem? Crouch's analysis maintains that the best line

is as
follows (the questions follow):

11.exd5 Qxd5 12.d4! exd4 13.cxd4 Ne4 (or the knight blocks the queens
retreat to d8) 14.Ne3 Qa5+ 15.Ke2! (Crouch's marking) f5 (maintaining

the
Knight's pressure on d2) 16.Bb3±


I'm not so hot about Ke2 either. Obviously the idea is to get the rook
h1 into play before the king moves to safety. The alternative 15. Nd2
runs into trouble after 15...Nd6 when d4 hangs. 15. Kf1 shuts out the
rook but looks ok to me after 15...Nf6 16. Bd2 Qh5 17. Bc3 0-0 18.
Ne5. White has active play in the center.

After 15. Ke2 simply 15...Nf6 keeps it simple and is a good
alternative to f5. For example 16. Re1 0-0 17. Kf1 Rd8 and the d-pawn
looks doomed. 18. d5 Nb4 or Ne7 doesn't relieve the situation. Neither
does 18. Bd2 Qb5+. If Black can reach this kind of position with
natural, not hard to come by moves then I'd say the whole Ke2 idea is
a failure.

After 16.Bb3 Bd7 17.Re1 O-O-O White has a zwischenzug 18.Nc4 which
blocks a possible ...Bb5 from beig a checking move and gains a tempo
by attacking the queen. After
18...Qb4 19.Kf1 Black cannot play 19...Nd4 anymore but 19...Rhe8
seems sufficient to give Black at least a small advantage, e.g. 20.Be3
g5 21.Nxg5 Nxd4


I suggest 18...Qb5 as an improvement for Black. The idea is to provoke
a4 when the Bb3 is only defended by the queen which makes Nxd4 ideas
once again valid. The pin also sets up threats against the Nc4 (Be6).

19. Kf1 Be6 20. Qe2 Nxd4 is definitely advantageous to Black.
19. Be3 f4 20. Bxf4 Nxd4 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. Kf1 Bc6 23. Qg4+ Kb8 24.
Ba2 Nxf2 and Black wins.
19. a4 Qb4 20. Be3 (20. Kf1 Nxd4)


After 20.Kf1 Nxd4 reduces Black's advantage. After 21.Nxd4 Bxd4
22.Qxd4 Qxb3 23.Na5 Qb6 (23...Qc2 24.Qa7 at least +/=) 24.Qxb6 cxb6
25.Nc4 b5 26.Nb6+ Kc7 27.Nxd7 and 28.axb5. Black will still have the
pawn plus, but the extra pawn is part of the doubled isolated b-pawns
and Black's king is still not very secure. I would evaluate this as
equal. However after 20.Kf1 Rhe8 be better than the similar position
where the a-pawn has not moved since the queen is tied to the defense
of the Bb3.

20...f4 21. Bxf4 Bxd4 (threat Nxf2)
22. Nxd4 Nxd4+ 23. Kf1 Bf5 with overwhelming game for Black.

One thing to note is that White could have played 14.Qe2 instead of
Ne3 and after 14...f5 15.Ne3 Qb5 (if 15...Qa5+ 16.Bd2) 16.Qxb5 axb5
17.Nd5 Kd8 18.Bf4 Nd6 19.Bg5+ Kd7 20.Be3 +/=


Here 15...Qd6 is an improvement over Qb5. 16. 0-0 0-0 pses no problems
to Black. If 16. Nxf5 so 16...Bxf5 17. Bxe4 0-0 and I think Black has
compensation for the pawn because of superior development, the
half-open f-file and the weakness of the d-pawn. In fact I'm not so
sure if White can hold the pawn.

For example 18. Bxf5 Rxf5 19. Be3 Qe6 20. a3 (preparing the Ra1 to
move, if 20. Qd2 Raf8 prepares the strong exchange sacrifice on f3)
20...Rd8 21. Rd1 (or 21. Rc1 Rfd5) 21...Rfd5 22. Rd2 Qf6.

If 18. Qc4+ Be6 19. Qc2 (better is 19. d5 Rd8 20. 0-0 (20. Bxh7+? Kxh7
21. Ng5+ Kg8 22. Nxe6 Bxf2+ 23. Kf1 Bg3+ 24. Nxf8 Qxf8+ 25. Bf4 Ne5
26. Qe4 Bxf4 with a winning attack) 20...Bxd5 =) 19...Nxd4 20. Nxd4
Bxd4 21. Bxh7+ Kh8 22. 0-0 Rxf2 23. Rxf2 Rf8.

Claus-Juergen




---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.707 / Virus Database: 463 - Release Date: 15/06/2004




  #6   Report Post  
Old June 20th 04, 10:54 PM
Chris Tilling
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysing "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch

I ought to add that the downloadable pgn is much easier to read than the
webpage

"Chris Tilling" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
For a summary and some new ideas, follow this link:

http://www.christilling.de/Defence/chigorinlasker.htm

I have included both of your analysis. Thanks very much I found your
comments very helpful and instructive.





---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.707 / Virus Database: 463 - Release Date: 15/06/2004


  #7   Report Post  
Old June 22nd 04, 01:06 PM
Claus-Jürgen Heigl
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysing "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch

Chris Tilling wrote:


As you find one of my lines confusing I feel I should elaborate a bit.
The line arises after

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6
5.d3 d6 6.Nbd2 a6 7.h3 Ba7 8.Bb3 Nd7 9.Nf1 Nc5 10.Bc2 d5
11.exd5 Qxd5 12.d4! exd4 13.cxd4 Ne4 14.Ne3 Qa5+ 15.Ke2! f5
16.Bb3 Bd7 17.Re1 O-O-O White has a zwischenzug 18.Nc4 (Mike Ogush)
18...Qb5 (Claus-Juergen Heigl)
19. Be3


FEN: 2kr3r/bppb2pp/p1n5/5p2/PqNPn3/1B2BN1P/1P2KPP1/R2QR3 b - -

19...f4


Black takes d4 by storm. I think this is better than 19...Be6 20. Nb6+
Bxb6 21. Bxe6+ Kb8 22. Qb3 Rxd4 which wins a pawn for Black but is
messy.

20. Bxf4 Nxd4 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. Kf1


Of course 22. Qxd4 loses the queen after 22...Bg4+.

22...Bc6


Discoveres the rook on the d-file. Black has lots of threats like
Bxb2, Nxf2, Bxf2.

23. Qg4+


There are two other queen moves: 23. Qf3 loses a piece after 23...Nc5
24. Qg4+ Bd7 25. Bd2 Qxb3 26. Qxd4 Be6 and 23. Qc2 Nxf2 with a very
strong attack on the f-file, e.g. 24. Ne3 Rhf8 25. Be6+ (25. Kxf2
Bxe3+ 26. Rxe3 Qxf4+ 27. Rf3 Rd2+; 25. Qxf2 Qxb3 26. h4 (against g5)
26...Bxe3 27. Rxe3 Qc4+ and 28...Rxf4.

The best defense is the counter-attack 23. Rxe4 Bxe4 24. Nd6+! cxd6
25. Rc1+ Bc5 26. Bxd6 Rxd6! (26...b6? 27. Rc4; after 26...Bxg2+ 27.
Kxg2 Qe4+ 28. Kh2 b6 29. Bd5 (the Bd6 was pinned) 29...Qf5 30. Bxc5
Rxd5 31. Be3+ Kb7 32. Qb3 Rd6 33. a5 b5 34. Qc3 White has an
unpleasant initiative) 27. Qxd6 Qxb3 28. Qxc5+ (28. Rxc5+ Bc6 29.
Rxc6+ bxc6 30. Qxc6+ is no perpetual) 28...Bc6 but Black's material
advantage will win.

23...Kb8


The Bb3 hangs now.

24. Ba2


The exchange sacrifice on e4 doesn't take off the pressure. 24. Rxe4
Bxe4 25. Qg3 (protects b3 and attacks c7) 25...Rhf8 (what the heck
with c7, Black has an attack of his own) 26. Bxc7+ Ka7 27. Bxd8 (27.
f4 g5 28. Ba2 (28. Bxd8 gxf4 wins the queen. The queen can't move to
safety because of Bd3 mate) 28...Rd7 (the Bc7 has to protect f4 but
has no moves) 29. Rd1 Rxc7 30. Rxd4 Rxf4+ 31. Kg1 Qc5 32. Qe3 (all
forced) 32...Bb1! 33. Rxf4 Qxe3+ 34. Nxe3 gxf4 and wins) 27...Rxf2+
28. Qxf2 (28. Kg1 Rxg2+) 28...Bd3+ 29. Qe2 Qxb3 30. Rc1 Bxb2 31. Bb6+
Ka8 32. Bc7 Bxe2+ 33. Kxe2 b5 and this endgame shouldn't be too hard
to win.

24...Nxf2 and Black wins.


He does in deed, for example 25. Qg3 Rhf8! 26. Bxc7+ Ka7 27. Bf4 Nh1!
28. Qh4 Rxf4+ 29. Qxf4 Rf8 30. Qxf8 Ng3 mate.

Claus-Juergen
  #8   Report Post  
Old June 22nd 04, 02:07 PM
Claus-Jürgen Heigl
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysing "How to Defend in Chess" by Colin Crouch

Claus-Jürgen Heigl wrote:

Chris Tilling wrote:


The best defense is the counter-attack 23. Rxe4 Bxe4 24. Nd6+!


Oops! This line doesn't work as the Nc4 is pinned. Somehow I mixed in
a4 (White) and Qb4 (Black). Say 22. a4 Qb4 23. Kf1 Bc6 24. Rxe4 and so
on.

Claus-Juergen
Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:20 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Chess"

 

Copyright © 2017