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Old June 21st 04, 06:09 PM
Toni Lassila
 
Posts: n/a
Default What kind of system is this?

Is there some kind of established ECO code for the opening 1. e4 g6 2.
Nc3 Bg7 3. Nf3 d6 4. Bc4? I've seen references to Pirc, Robatch and
Modern Defense used but this line seems to be rare, especially after
4...e5. Other than that I think there's quite nice tactics for such a
closed game. Comments welcome as usual.

[Event "Internet Match"]
[Site "queenalice.com"]
[Date "2004.06.??"]
[White "Grinberg, Miguel"]
[Black "Lassila, Toni"]
[Result "0-1"]

1. e4 g6 2. Nc3 Bg7 3. Nf3 d6 4. Bc4 e5 5. d3 Nf6

{ Why not 5. d4? }

6. O-O O-O 7. Bg5 c6 8. d4 Nbd7 9. d5 c5

{ 9. d5?! seems like a waste. Now the center is locked and Black has
the opportunity to ease his cramped position. }

10. a3 a6 11. b4 Qc7 12. Qd3 b5

{ White loses tempo and locks his light-squared bishop in, allowing
Black to counter on the kingside. }

13. Ba2 c4 14. Qd2 Ng4 15. h3 f6

{ With the idea that White's pieces are further away from his king's
defense so if the pawn structures are messed up it's Black who stands
to attack first. }

16. hxg4 fxg5 17. Nxg5 Bh6

{ The sac of the pawn is more than compensated by the knight pin and
the pawn comes back soon enough. }

18. Ne2 Nf6 19. f3 Qa7+ 20. Kh2 Bxg4

{ 21. fxg4? Nxe4 -+ }

21. a4 Bd7

{ There's a nice tactic instead of 21...Bd7?!. 21...Nxe4! 22. fxe4 Qe7
23. Ng1 Bxg5 24. Qe1 Qg7! 25. Nh3 Qh6 -+ }

22. g4 Bxg4

{ Again the bishop is untouchable. }

23. axb5 axb5

{ And again 23...Nxe4! wins. }

24. Bxc4 Qb6 25. Rxa8 Rxa8 26. Bd3 Bd7 27. Ng3 Rf8 28. Kg2 Qd8 29. Rh1
Bxg5

{ Black is winning but I get nervous over the rook on h1. 29...Nh5 30.
Nxh5 Bxg5 31. Qe2 gxh5 and White has no way in. Now it's anybody's
game. }

30. Qxg5 Kh8 31. Qxg6 Rg8 32. Qh6 Qf8 33. Qh4 Rg6 34. Rh3 Bxh3+

{ Must be a blunder, I see no benefit from the exchange sac. }

35. Qxh3 Qe8 36. c4 bxc4

{ The innocent looking push 36. c4?? loses the game. The queen goes
for a round trip and comes back to mate. }

37. Bxc4 Qa4 38. Qc8+ Ng8 39. Qa6 Qxb4 40. Qb5 Qd2+ 0-1

{ For example 41. Kh3 Qf2 42. Nf5 Qg2+ 43. Kh4 Qh1# and 41. Kf1 Rxg3
42. Qb6 Rxf3+ 43. Kg1 Qg5+ 44. Kh2 Qh4+ 45. Kg2 Qg4+ 46. Kh1 Qh3+ 47.
Kg1 Qg4+ 48. anything Rh3#. }

--
King's Gambit - http://kingsgambit.blogspot.com
Chess problems, tactics, analysis and more.
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Old June 21st 04, 11:31 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default What kind of system is this?

On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 20:09:05 +0300, Toni Lassila
wrote:

Is there some kind of established ECO code for the opening 1. e4 g6 2.
Nc3 Bg7 3. Nf3 d6 4. Bc4? I've seen references to Pirc, Robatch and
Modern Defense used but this line seems to be rare, especially after
4...e5. Other than that I think there's quite nice tactics for such a
closed game. Comments welcome as usual.

[Event "Internet Match"]
[Site "queenalice.com"]
[Date "2004.06.??"]
[White "Grinberg, Miguel"]
[Black "Lassila, Toni"]
[Result "0-1"]

1. e4 g6 2. Nc3 Bg7 3. Nf3 d6 4. Bc4 e5 5. d3 Nf6

SNIP


With the move order you gave it would be classified as ECO code B06.

However, once Black plays e5, the position could be reached via a
different move order (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Nc3 g6 4.Bc4 Bg7) out of the
Philidor Defense (ECO code C40 or C41).

Of the 20 games that I found that reached the position after 4...e5 .
1 was classified as A00 (1.Nc3 g6, etc.)
7 were classified as B06 (Your move order - more or less)
1 was classified as B07 (I think because of subsequent moves 5.O-O Nc6
6.d3)
1 was classified as C25 (1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 g6, etc.)
1 was classified as C40 (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 g6 3.Bc4 d6 3.Nc3 Bg7)
9 were classifed as C41 (1.e4 e4 2.Nf3 d6 3.Nc3 g6 4.Bc4 Bg7)

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