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Old July 1st 04, 08:52 PM
Samik
 
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Default Interesting QGD variation...please analyse

I played this game with Black, and was very disappointed to loase
because I failed to punish White's inferior choice of opening.
Could anyone please analyse and tell me where I went wrong
(or, at what point the game was lost ?)

1)d4 d5 2)c4 e6 3)Nc3 Nf6 4) Nf3 Nbd7 5)c5 !!
...c6 (if b6 6.c6!) 6)b4 Be7 7)Bf4 b6 8)Qa4 Bb7 9)e3 a5 10)b5
Qc8 11)Ne5 Ne5 12)Be5 bc 13)bc Bc5 (winning a pawn)
14)Rc1 Bb4 15) a3 Be7 16)Bd3 c5 17)b6+ Kf8 18)Bb5 Bd8 19)Qf4 Nd7
20)Bd6+ Be7 21)Na4 c4 22)00 g5 (to free the game) 23)Be7 Ke7
24)Qg5+ Nf6 25)f3 Rg8 26)Qh4 h5 27)e4 Qb8 28)ed Bd4 29)Bc4 Qe5
30)Bd5 Qd5 31)Rc7+ 0-1

waiting for replies
Samik
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Old July 1st 04, 10:41 PM
Toni Lassila
 
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Default Interesting QGD variation...please analyse

On 1 Jul 2004 12:52:18 -0700, (Samik) wrote:

I played this game with Black, and was very disappointed to loase
because I failed to punish White's inferior choice of opening.
Could anyone please analyse and tell me where I went wrong
(or, at what point the game was lost ?)

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nf3


More active is Bg5, allowing for e5 and Ne2 later on unless Black
plays something to prevent this.

4...Nbd7 5. c5?


Premature, more sensible is Bg5 or e3. White is slightly ahead and the
break cxd5 will open things up later on, allowing him to capitalize on
this advantage.

...c6 6. b4 Be7 7. Bf4?!


Now White can't play the natural e3 due to losing the bishop pair.
7...O-O 8. e3 Bh5.

7...b6 8. Qa4 Bb7 9. e3 a5 10. b5 Qc8 11. Ne5 Nxe5 12. Bxe5 bxc5
13. dxc5 Bxc5 14. Rc1 Bb4 15. a3 Be7 16. Bd3 c5?


Losing the right to castle.

17. b6+! Kf8 18. Bb5 Bd8


Better is 18...c4! and now White has to take the long way to attack on
the king side.

19. Qf4 Nd7 20. Bd6+ Be7 21. Na4 c4 22. O-O


Probably unneeded, White can get good play by starting a pawn storm on
the king side with all of Black's pieces stuck on the queen side.

22...g5??


The decisive error. White still has his dark squared bishop and queen
so weakening f6 and h6 is a horrible positional mistake. Not to
mention the tactic losing the pawn outright. You were not losing the
game before this move and overreacted. When the position looks
precarious, it's more important than ever to play carefully,
thoughtfully and unless threatened by an immediate tactic, make quiet
moves that improve your position and prevent any ideas of your
opponents.

23. Bxe7+ Kxe7 24. Qxg5+ Nf6 25. f3 Rg8 26. Qh4 h5?


Loses to the tactic: 27. Bxc4! dxc4 28. Rxc4 with 29. Rc7+ and Black
must give material or be mated.

27. e4 Qb8 28. exd5 Bxd5 29. Bxc4 Qe5 30. Bxd5 Qxd5 31. Rc7+ 1-0


--
King's Gambit -
http://kingsgambit.blogspot.com
Chess problems, tactics, analysis and more.
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Old July 2nd 04, 05:50 AM
Mark S. Hathaway
 
Posts: n/a
Default Interesting QGD variation...please analyse

Samik wrote:

I played this game with Black, and was very disappointed to loase
because I failed to punish White's inferior choice of opening.
Could anyone please analyse and tell me where I went wrong
(or, at what point the game was lost ?)

1)d4 d5 2)c4 e6 3)Nc3 Nf6 4) Nf3 Nbd7 5)c5 !!
...c6 (if b6 6.c6!) 6)b4 Be7 7)Bf4 b6 8)Qa4 Bb7 9)e3 a5 10)b5
Qc8 11)Ne5 Ne5 12)Be5 bc 13)bc Bc5 (winning a pawn)
14)Rc1 Bb4 15) a3 Be7 16)Bd3 c5 17)b6+ Kf8 18)Bb5 Bd8 19)Qf4 Nd7
20)Bd6+ Be7 21)Na4 c4 22)00 g5 (to free the game) 23)Be7 Ke7
24)Qg5+ Nf6 25)f3 Rg8 26)Qh4 h5 27)e4 Qb8 28)ed Bd4 29)Bc4 Qe5
30)Bd5 Qd5 31)Rc7+ 0-1

waiting for replies
Samik


1. d4 d5
2. c4 e6
3. Nc3 Nf6
4. Nf3 Nbd7

{ preferable is ...Be7 }

5. c5

{ Usually this sort of advance is premature and in giving up
pressure on pawn d5 gives Black something. }

5...c6

{ seems good }

( 5...b6 6. c6 Nb8 7. Ne5 Bd6 { does seem to leave Black
terribly squeezed } )

6. b4 Be7

{ This is where I think you went astray in believing
White was "just too good". Black needs to fight back. }

( 6...b6 7. a3 a5 8. Rb1 axb5 9. axb5 bxc5 10. bxc5 Qc7
{preparing ...e6-e5} )

and Black should be alright. White's lead in development shouldn't
do much damage when Black's pawn structure is so solid

c4-c5 is the kind of move which can really throw one off balance.
It really puts you on your own resources (out of your book knowledge).
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