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Old July 13th 04, 01:54 AM
Kenny Benji
 
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Default how good advise is this?

i asked a friend the very first thing i should learn in chess as i'm staring
out, and he said: "mates".

is this true? he said to memorize mates in 1, 2, 3, 4 and even 5 from books.
recognize the patterns. understand how to get into those positions from other
positions.

i asked about the beginning, end, and middle game, and he says after i buy a
book completely on mates and learning how to spot mates 5 and less, then start
on the end game, and understand how to get advantages when mates are not
possible.

anyway, now i've made it to rec.games.chess.analysis, and wondered, is this very
good information he gave me? thanks.


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Old July 13th 04, 06:43 AM
Brian Kerr
 
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Default how good advise is this?

"Kenny Benji" wrote in message
...
i asked a friend the very first thing i should learn in chess as i'm

staring
out, and he said: "mates".

is this true? he said to memorize mates in 1, 2, 3, 4 and even 5 from

books.
recognize the patterns. understand how to get into those positions from

other
positions.

i asked about the beginning, end, and middle game, and he says after i buy

a
book completely on mates and learning how to spot mates 5 and less, then

start
on the end game, and understand how to get advantages when mates are not
possible.

anyway, now i've made it to rec.games.chess.analysis, and wondered, is

this very
good information he gave me? thanks.



It's only good if you want to get really good at chess. Absolutely listen
to this advice.


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Old July 13th 04, 06:47 AM
Avanti
 
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Default how good advise is this?


"Kenny Benji" wrote in message
...
i asked a friend the very first thing i should learn in chess as i'm

staring
out, and he said: "mates".

is this true?


Learning mating patterns is certainley useful however the tactics before
that are important, the basic strategies tactics and 'simple' rook or pawn
end games will take you a long way.....


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Old July 13th 04, 06:22 PM
Mike Ogush
 
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Default how good advise is this?

On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 00:54:42 GMT, "Kenny Benji"
wrote:

i asked a friend the very first thing i should learn in chess as i'm staring
out, and he said: "mates".

is this true? he said to memorize mates in 1, 2, 3, 4 and even 5 from books.
recognize the patterns. understand how to get into those positions from other
positions.

i asked about the beginning, end, and middle game, and he says after i buy a
book completely on mates and learning how to spot mates 5 and less, then start
on the end game, and understand how to get advantages when mates are not
possible.

anyway, now i've made it to rec.games.chess.analysis, and wondered, is this very
good information he gave me? thanks.


I would modify the advice slightly and suggest learning matting
"patterns" first rather than studying 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 move mate
problems.

The first mating patterns you should study are those often found in
endgame books - mating with king and queen vs. king, mating with king
and rook vs. king, and mating with king and two bishops vs. king.
[Another ending mating pattern is mating with king, bishop and knight
vs. king. This comes up so rarely that you should defer study of this
for quite a while.]

Second, you should study mating patterns that have occurred in actual
games, as opposed to only occurring in composed problems. One of the
drawbacks of studying composed problems is that some of the positions
would never arise in a real game. I recommend the book "Art of
Checkmate" by Georges Renaud and Victor Kahn to help in the study of
different mating patterns. Another recent book which covers mating
patterns is "How To Beat Your Dad at Chess". I have heard good things
about, but I have not studied the book myself.

Third, study tactical patterns and themes, e.g. pin, skewer, fork,
discovered attack, etc. A good resource for basic tactics is John
Bain's "Chess Tactics for Students".

Fourth, study chess endings, particularly king and pawn endings (which
are the basis for most other endings) and rook endings (which occur
most frequently). Two books that teach endings for beginners a
"Essential Chess Endings Move by Move" by Jeremy Silman and
"Pandolfini's Endgame Course" by Bruce Pandolfini. A good
reference/teaching work that will last a lifetime is "Fundamental
Chess Endings" by Karsten Muller & Frank Lamprecht

Finally a note about the order of study I proposed - this is only the
order of "starting" your studies. You do not have to complete one
area of study before starting the next. In fact tactics and endings
will probably be areas of study for as long as you play chess; the
only difference is that as time goes on you'll study more advanced
positions.

Mike Ogush
USCF 1921


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Old July 17th 04, 11:46 PM
Jim Grieve
 
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Default how good advise is this?

I found "Simple Checkmates" by A.J. Gillam to be an excellent starter book on
mating paterns. The format is also very attractive and useful with 2 clear
mating problems on each page with the answers righe below them.

Jim
later on you might want to try 1001 Brilliant Ways to Checkmate by Fred
Reinfeld (much harder).



On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 20:54:42 -0400, Kenny Benji wrote
(in message ):

i asked a friend the very first thing i should learn in chess as i'm staring
out, and he said: "mates".

is this true? he said to memorize mates in 1, 2, 3, 4 and even 5 from books.
recognize the patterns. understand how to get into those positions from other
positions.

i asked about the beginning, end, and middle game, and he says after i buy a
book completely on mates and learning how to spot mates 5 and less, then
start
on the end game, and understand how to get advantages when mates are not
possible.

anyway, now i've made it to rec.games.chess.analysis, and wondered, is this
very
good information he gave me? thanks.





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