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Old July 14th 04, 08:30 AM
Avanti
 
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Default Another please analyse and guess the opponents grade

1. e4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e5 c5 4. b4 Nc6 5. bxc5 Bxc5 6. d4 Bb4+ 7. c3 Ba5 8.
Ba3

Nge7 9. Bd3 Nf5 10. O-O Nce7 11. Bc2 Bd7 12. Re1 Rc8 13. Bb4 Bxb4 14. cxb4
Qb6

15. a3 Rc4 16. Bd3 Rc7 17. Bc2 h5 18. Qd2 f6 19. a4 Rc8 20. a5 Qc7 21. Bd3
Kf7

22. Ra3 a6 23. Rc3 Qb8 24. Rec1 Rxc3 25. Rxc3 Rc8 26. Na3 Rxc3 27. Qxc3 Qc8

28. Qxc8 {Draw agreed} 1/2-1/2

Running this throught he Fritz analysis does not show any obvious tactical
or positional misses.



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Old July 14th 04, 11:32 AM
Roman M. Parparov
 
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Default Another please analyse and guess the opponents grade

Avanti wrote:
1. e4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e5 c5 4. b4 Nc6 5. bxc5 Bxc5 6. d4 Bb4+ 7. c3 Ba5 8.
Ba3


Nge7 9. Bd3 Nf5 10. O-O Nce7 11. Bc2 Bd7 12. Re1 Rc8 13. Bb4 Bxb4 14. cxb4
Qb6


15. a3 Rc4 16. Bd3 Rc7 17. Bc2 h5 18. Qd2 f6 19. a4 Rc8 20. a5 Qc7 21. Bd3
Kf7


22. Ra3 a6 23. Rc3 Qb8 24. Rec1 Rxc3 25. Rxc3 Rc8 26. Na3 Rxc3 27. Qxc3 Qc8


28. Qxc8 {Draw agreed} 1/2-1/2


Running this throught he Fritz analysis does not show any obvious tactical
or positional misses.


Why are you using a chess engine that plays chess even worse than you
to help you analyze?

See this post:
http://groups.google.com/groups?selm...&output=gplain

And the cause of that post:
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=e...enetserver.com
--
Roman M. Parparov - NASA EOSDIS project node at TAU technical manager.
Email: http://www.nasa.proj.ac.il/
Phone/Fax: +972-(0)3-6405205 (work), +972-(0)51-34-18-34 (home)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on
weather forecasters.
-- Jean-Paul Kauffmann
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Old July 15th 04, 04:14 AM
Mark S. Hathaway
 
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Default Another please analyse and guess the opponents grade

Avanti wrote:

1. e4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e5 c5 4. b4 Nc6


( 4...c4 )

5. bxc5 Bxc5 6. d4 Bb4+ 7. c3 Ba5 8. Ba3

Nge7 9. Bd3 Nf5 10. O-O Nce7 11. Bc2 Bd7 12. Re1 Rc8 13. Bb4 Bxb4 14. cxb4
Qb6

15. a3 Rc4 16. Bd3 Rc7 17. Bc2 h5 18. Qd2 f6 19. a4 Rc8 20. a5 Qc7 21. Bd3
Kf7

22. Ra3 a6 23. Rc3 Qb8 24. Rec1 Rxc3 25. Rxc3 Rc8 26. Na3 Rxc3 27. Qxc3 Qc8

28. Qxc8 {Draw agreed} 1/2-1/2

Running this throught he Fritz analysis does not show any obvious tactical
or positional misses.



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Old July 15th 04, 06:17 AM
Claus-Jürgen Heigl
 
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Default Another please analyse and guess the opponents grade

Avanti wrote:

Blunder-checking with Fritz can get you only so far. It doesn't tell
you much about what to do when there are no tactics.

1. e4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e5 c5 4. b4 Nc6


If Black doesn't want to take the pawn, which I think is better, I
guess 4...b6 and 4...c4 are better alternatives. 4...b6 maintains the
pawn on c5. If White defends b4 with 5. c3 Black can play 5...Qd7
which prepares 6...Ba6 and exchange of the french (bad) bishop. After
4...c4 Black can open the c-file if White advances the d-pawn. Also
the white b-pawn can't stay on b4 for long. Sonner or later White is
forced to assume the pawn formation a4-b5, where Black has a good
control of the Black squares on the queenside.

The move (Nc6) allows the diagonal a3-f8 to be opened.

5. bxc5 Bxc5 6. d4 Bb4+ 7. c3 Ba5


Now Black gets problems on the diagonal a3-f8. If Black wanted to keep
his bishop on the a3-f8 diagonal he better had abstained from the
check as c3 was actually a useful move for White. After 7...Be7 Black
has a problem how to develop his kingside. The plan f7-f6 is slow as
White is already well developed. Perhaps 7...Be7 8. 0-0 h5 intending
Nh6 works, although it looks suspicious. Anyway it's much better than
what could have happened.

8. Ba3 Nge7 9. Bd3 Nf5


That's the problem. How does the Black king get into safety? If
9...0-0 White attacks with 10. h4 (The bishop sac 10. Bxh7+ Kxh7 11.
Ng5+ Kg6 12. Qg4 f5 13. Qg3 f4 14. Qg4 Qe8 plan Kh6 and Qh5 doesn't
hit home) 10...h5 (now Bxh7 was a threat, for example 10...Bd7? 11.
Bxh7+! Kxh7 12. Ng5+ Kg6 (12...Kh6 13. Bc1 Qb6 14. Ne4+ Kg6 15. Qg4+
Kh7 16. Qh5+ Kg8 17. Ng5 Rfe8 18. Qh7+ Kf8 19. Qh8+ Ng8 20. Nh7+ Ke7
21. Bg5+ f6 22. Nxf6! 1-0) 13. h5+! Kh6 14. Bc1 Qb6 15. Qd3 Nf5 16. g4
Rfe8 17. gxf5 exf5 18. Qg3 and wins. If 10...h6 11. g4 with attack.)
11. Ng5 g6 12. 0-0 followed by 13. Qf3. White has a good game.

The queenside isn't inviting either. 10...Bd7 11. 0-0 Qb6 12. Qc2
0-0-0? 13. Nbd2 Rdf8 14. Rb1 Qd8 15. c4 and White attacks.

10. O-O Nce7 11. Bc2


What's the purpose of this move? Simply 11. g4 Nh6 12. h3 and Black is
reduced to waiting for the assault. 13. Ng5 is a simple threat and if
Black plays Ng6 to interrupt the diagonal d3-h7 it looks like he will
never castle (Ng6, Nh6-g8-e7 and 0-0 costs much, much time). Black is
probably lost here, it's just a matter of when and how. Counterplay is
not in sight. Things like 12...f5 13. exf6 gxf6 14. Bb5+ Bd7 15. Bxd7
Qxd7 16. Bxe7 Kxe7 17. Qc1 threatening Qxh6 and Qa3+ do not work at
all.

The move loses time, blocks the queen from good squares (b3, c2) and
the rook from protecting the c-pawn on the c-file. Black now has a
counterattack on the c-pawn.

Bd7 12. Re1 Rc8 13. Bb4


There goes the beautiful bishop. That was White's best piece. Better
to give the other bishop away, come to the rescue of c3 and keep the
pawn chain c3-d4-e5 intact. 13. Bxf5 Nxf5 14. Qb3 Qc7 15. Rc1. White
can finish his development with Nbd2 while Black still can't castle.
But the pawn c3 remains a liability. White has to look if he can play
c4.

Bxb4 14. cxb4


d4 is now a weakness.

Qb6


Black attacks it immediately, but more precise was 14...Qc7. The white
bishop has no good squares. 15. Bd3 Qb6 costs a pawn, 15. Bd3 Qb6 and
White has to trade on f5 anyway. After 15. Bxf5 Nxf5 Black controls
the c-file.

15. a3 Rc4


Black should castle and double the rooks on the c-file. It's easy for
White to defend the d-pawn while improving pieces.

16. Bd3


Blocks the queen from defending the d-pawn. As a consequence, the
bishop has to move again, tempo wasted. 16. Bb3 Rc7 17. Ra2 0-0 18.
Rc2 contests the c-file, 16. Nbd2 Rc7 (16...Rc3 17. Nb3 Ba4 18. Qd2
gains nothing) 17. Nb3 with the plan Nc5 looks even better.

Rc7 17. Bc2


The consequence of the weak 16th move was a free move for Black.

h5 18. Qd2 f6


Although thematic, this losens the position just a bit too much.
Safe, if boring was 18...0-0 followed by Rfc8.

19. a4 Rc8 20. a5 Qc7 21. Bd3
Kf7 22. Ra3 a6 23. Rc3


Just as White has got all under control he lets up. 23. Nc3 is very
unpleasant for Black. Black is stalled on the queenside while White
builds up an attack on the kingside. Depending on what Black does,
White can install a knight on f4 or even c5 (Nc3-e2-f4-d3-c5). Another
excellent plan would be Nc3-d1-e3 which gets rid of the Nf5, then play
Qf4. Black has absolutely no counterplay, White has a big advantage
here.

Just an example: 23. Nc3 Qb8 24. Nd1 Qa7 25. Ne3 Nh6 26. h3 Be8 27.
exf6 gxf6 28. Nh4 Kg7 29. Nc2 Bf7 30. Re3 Rcg8 31. Rc3 Qb8 32. Rc5 Qd6
33. Be2 Nhf5 34. Nxf5 Nxf5 35. Rec3 Ne7 36. b5 and so on.

Qb8 24. Rec1 Rxc3 25. Rxc3 Rc8 26. Na3 Rxc3 27. Qxc3 Qc8

28. Qxc8 {Draw agreed} 1/2-1/2


White should avoid the queen exchange. Black can't do much on the
c-file. White can still push the g-pawn (g3, h3, g4, g5) and look for
chances on the kingside.
The final position looks better for Black. White has to defend many
pawn weaknesses.

28...Bxc8 (Black threatens g5-g4) 29. h4 Bd7 30. Kf1 Ba4 31. Ke2 Ne7
32. exf6 gxf6 33. Kd3 Nc6 34. Kc3 e5. I don't say Black is winning
here, but it looks like White fights for the draw.

Claus-Juergen
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