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Old July 23rd 04, 05:35 AM
David Pollitt
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis Requested from Mike Ogush and other people.

I found reading Mike Ogush's analysis very helpful in posts he has made
here before, and I was wondering if you could help me as well.
If you could help me know where I went wrong in this game I would
be thankful. I felt that I had an early lead, and then I got his bishop,
knight, and a rook for my queen. But I lost anyway. What should I have
done differently?

White: John B.
Black: David P.

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7
5. Ng5 Ngf6

I thought he was unwise to advance his knight instead of continuing to
develop.

6. Bd3 e6 7. N1f3 h6 8. Nxe6 ...

I did not understand why he did this! He is giving me his knight
for a pawn? At this point I thought about taking his night with
with the pawn, but I did not want to have a lone unprotected pawn.

....Qe7

9. O-O ...

I had to take with the pawn otherwise he would pin my queen
against my king.

....fxe6 10. Bg6+ Kd8 11. Bf4 b5
12. a4 Bb7 13. Re1 Nd5 14. Bg3 Kc8 15. axb5 cxb5 16. Qd3 Bc6
17. Bf5 exf5

I was feeling that my king was under threat so I decided to
get a rook and a bishop for my queen and also get my black
bishop into the game and to hopefully link up my rooks.

18. Rxe7 Bxe7 19. c4 Nb4 20. Qe2 Be4 21. cxb5 Kd8
22. Rc1 Nf6 23. Bc7+ Ke8 24. Ne5 Rc8

I have pined his bishop. I wanted to try Nd5, but he had other ideas.

25. b6 a6 26. Ng6 Kf7
27. Nxh8+ Rxh8 28. Be5 Rg8 29. Qd1 Rd8 30. Qb3+ Bd5 31. Qa4 Ne8
32. Rc3 Kf8

I wanted to hide behind my wall of pieces.

33. Bc7 Ra8 34. Qd7 Be4 35. Qe6 Bf6 36. g4 Nd3
37. gxf5 Nxf2

My idea here was to protect the bishop and hopefully he would
fall for taking my knight with his king and then I would fork
his rook.

38. Bd6+ Nxd6 39. Qxd6+ Be7 40. Qc7 Nd1
41. b7 Nxc3 42. bxa8=Q+ Bxa8 43. bxc3 Bf3 44. Qc8+ Kf7
45. Qxa6 Bg5 46. c4 Be3+

Finally I go on the offensive and get my first check!

47. Kf1 Bg5 48. d5 Bf6 49. Qe6+ Kf8
50. d6 Bd8 51. Qd7 Bg5 52. Qc8+ Kf7 53. d7 Be7 54. Qe8+ Kf6
55. Qg6+ Ke5 56. Qe6+ Kf4 57. Qxe7 g5

I wanted to hide behind some pawns.

58. pxpep Bg4

He did not go for it.

59. d8=Q Bh3+

My last gasp to get a check!

60. Kf2 Bd7 61. Qe3+ Kf5 62. Qf8+ Kg4
63. Qf4+ Kh5 64. Qxh6# 1-0

Well at least I lasted 63 and a half moves! Where was my big mistake? Was
losing my queen the turning point of the game, even though I got good
material for her in return?
  #2   Report Post  
Old July 23rd 04, 08:55 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis Requested from Mike Ogush and other people.

On 23 Jul 2004 04:35:40 GMT, (David Pollitt)
wrote:

I found reading Mike Ogush's analysis very helpful in posts he has made
here before, and I was wondering if you could help me as well.
If you could help me know where I went wrong in this game I would
be thankful. I felt that I had an early lead, and then I got his bishop,
knight, and a rook for my queen. But I lost anyway. What should I have
done differently?

White: John B.
Black: David P.

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7
5. Ng5 Ngf6

I thought he was unwise to advance his knight instead of continuing to
develop.


5.Ng5 is a perfectly legitimate move. Among the strong GMs who have
played this multiple times as white: Adams, Anand, Deep Blue,
Ivanchuk, Kamsky, Khalifman, Shirov, TJudit Polgar,Timman,Topolov.
Karpov, Seirawan, and Speelman are the strongest players, who have
faced the Black side.

One of White's ideas is to provoke Black into playing ...h6 too early
when the knight sacrifice at e6 is strong.

Your game follows the 6th game of Deep-Blue Kasparov, 1997 match. In
that game Kasparov suffered one of his shortest losses ever.

6. Bd3 e6 7. N1f3 h6


As the commentary on the Deep Blue-Kasparov game pointed out 7...h6 is
a grave mistake because it allows White to sacrifice at e6. I don't
believe that 8.Nxe6 has been shown to be a forced win for White, but
does put such strong pressure on Black's king that White's
compensation is more than worth the piece.

The best move from opening theory is 7...Bd6. Play typically goes
8.Qe2 h6 9.Ne4 (9.Nxe6 doesn't work as well here because after
9...fxe6 10.Bg6+ Ke7 11.O-O Black has 11...Nf8 overprotecting the pawn
and dring the bishop away. 12.Bd3 Bd7 13.Ne5 Qe8 and The black king
will go to relative safety at c7 via d8. White does not have enough
compensation for the material sacrificed.) 9...Nxe4 10.Qxe4 and Black
has a playable game. [One of the Kasparov-Karpov world championship
games had this varaition; the game ended in a draw.

8. Nxe6 ...

I did not understand why he did this! He is giving me his knight
for a pawn? At this point I thought about taking his night with
with the pawn, but I did not want to have a lone unprotected pawn.


White's main compensation is that Black's king cannot castle and will
most likely be stuck in the center where White can build up an attack.

When I searched for games with this position where one or both players
had Elo 2400 I found 27 games. Black managed to win 5 times and
draw 4 times and White owon 16 times. Also 2 of the draws and 2 of
the wins are more likely due to the fact that Black was 200 rating
points above White. Not very comforting for the Black side.

...Qe7

9. O-O ...

I had to take with the pawn otherwise he would pin my queen
against my king.

...fxe6 10. Bg6+ Kd8 11. Bf4


Two other moves have been tried by White:
a) 11.Re1
b) 11.c4 to prevent ...Nd5

b5


Somewhat better is 11...Nd5 12.Bg3 Qb4. One of the wins by Black and
one of the draws occurred in this variation.

Kasparov against Deep Blue is the only game where 11...b5 was played.

12. a4 Bb7 13. Re1 Nd5 14. Bg3 Kc8 15. axb5 cxb5 16. Qd3 Bc6
17. Bf5 exf5

I was feeling that my king was under threat so I decided to
get a rook and a bishop for my queen and also get my black
bishop into the game and to hopefully link up my rooks.


17...exf5 is relatively best.
a) 17...Nb4 18.Qc3 Qf6 19.Bh3 and White is going to break through at
e6.
b) 17...Kb7 protecting the Bc6 18.Rxe6 Qb4 19.Rxc6 Kxc6 20.Bxd7 Kxd7
21.Qf5+ and Black must give large amounts of material to avoid mate.

18. Rxe7 Bxe7 19. c4


After White's (Deep Blue's) 19th move Kasparov resigned. The game is
hopeless for Black unless White does something very stupid.

In addtion to the commentary in this message you may want to look for
annotations of the Deep Blue-kasparov game on-line. They should
explain further what Kasparov did wrong.

I agree with Kasparov's decision; the position is lost. However, in
your game White makes some minor mistakes that could have diminished
his advantage. Most of the remaining comments describe ways White
could have won more quickly.

Nb4 20. Qe2


Better is 20.Qxf5 It keeps Black's bishop from interferring with open
lines at e4. Then after 20...Kd8 (20...Rf8 21.Qe6 Bd8 22.d5 Rf6
23.Qg4 h5 24.Qh3 Bb7 25.Ne5 Rd6 26.Nf7 Rf6 27.Nd6+ Rxd6 28.Bxd6 +-)
21.d5 Rf8 22.Qe4 Bb7 23.Re1 Rf7 24.Ne5 Nxe5 25.Qxe5 Ke8 26.Qc7 Bc8
27.Bd6 +-

Be4 21. cxb5 Kd8
22. Rc1


Better was 22.Nd2 with the idea of Nxe4 or f3.

Nf6


A problem with this move is that it allows White to play Ne5. Better
was 22...Rf8 and if 23.Bc7+ Ke8 and Black can find a safer haven for
his King on the king-side, e.g., 24.Bg3 Kf7 25.Rc7 Rfd8. This
variation was probably the last point that Black might have salvaged a
draw.

23. Bc7+


23.Ne5! Rf8 24.f3 Bd5 25.Ng6 Rf7 26.Bc7+ Kd7 27.Ba5 Bd6 28.Ne5+ and
Black is going to lose at least a piece +-

Ke8 24. Ne5 Rc8

I have pined his bishop. I wanted to try Nd5, but he had other ideas.

25. b6 a6 26. Ng6


26.f3! if Bd5 27.Ng6 and Black loses a piece

Kf7
27. Nxh8+


Better 27.Nxe7 Kxe7 28.f3 which wins a piece rather than just an
exchange.

Rxh8 28. Be5 Rg8 29. Qd1 Rd8 30. Qb3+ Bd5 31. Qa4 Ne8
32. Rc3 Kf8

I wanted to hide behind my wall of pieces.

33. Bc7 Ra8 34. Qd7 Be4 35. Qe6


Better 35.Re3 Nf6 36.Qe6 Re8 37.Rxe4 fxe4 38.b7 must give up his rook
after the b-pawn queens.

Bf6 36. g4 Nd3
37. gxf5 Nxf2

My idea here was to protect the bishop and hopefully he would
fall for taking my knight with his king and then I would fork
his rook.


You need to look further. After after 38.Kxf2 Bxd4+ 39.Kf1 Bxc3
White has the zwischenzug 40.Qxe4! which threatens the rook at a8
before recapturing at c3. After 40...Rc8 41.bxc3 Black is completely
lost.

In this position it did not matter as much (Black was lost in any
case); however, you might benefit from practicing calculating tactical
positions until they reach a point where no more exchanges are
possible. Especially look for zwischenzugs that dramatically change
the evalaution of resulting positions.


38. Bd6+ Nxd6 39. Qxd6+ Be7 40. Qc7 Nd1
41. b7 Nxc3 42. bxa8=Q+ Bxa8 43. bxc3 Bf3 44. Qc8+ Kf7
45. Qxa6 Bg5 46. c4 Be3+

Finally I go on the offensive and get my first check!

47. Kf1 Bg5 48. d5 Bf6 49. Qe6+ Kf8
50. d6 Bd8 51. Qd7 Bg5 52. Qc8+ Kf7 53. d7 Be7 54. Qe8+ Kf6
55. Qg6+ Ke5 56. Qe6+ Kf4 57. Qxe7 g5

I wanted to hide behind some pawns.

58. pxpep Bg4

He did not go for it.

59. d8=Q Bh3+

My last gasp to get a check!

60. Kf2 Bd7 61. Qe3+ Kf5 62. Qf8+ Kg4
63. Qf4+ Kh5 64. Qxh6# 1-0

Well at least I lasted 63 and a half moves! Where was my big mistake? Was
losing my queen the turning point of the game, even though I got good
material for her in return?


  #3   Report Post  
Old July 24th 04, 06:22 AM
David Pollitt
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis Requested from Mike Ogush and other people.

You figured me out! I felt that Kasparov could have gone a few more moves
though. What opening do you think he should have tried? I will go over
your analysis and work on my game.

Mike Ogush ) writes:
On 23 Jul 2004 04:35:40 GMT, (David Pollitt)
wrote:
I found reading Mike Ogush's analysis very helpful in posts he has made
here before, and I was wondering if you could help me as well.
If you could help me know where I went wrong in this game I would
be thankful. I felt that I had an early lead, and then I got his bishop,
knight, and a rook for my queen. But I lost anyway. What should I have
done differently?

White: John B.
Black: David P.

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7
5. Ng5 Ngf6

I thought he was unwise to advance his knight instead of continuing to
develop.


5.Ng5 is a perfectly legitimate move. Among the strong GMs who have
played this multiple times as white: Adams, Anand, Deep Blue,
Ivanchuk, Kamsky, Khalifman, Shirov, TJudit Polgar,Timman,Topolov.
Karpov, Seirawan, and Speelman are the strongest players, who have
faced the Black side.

One of White's ideas is to provoke Black into playing ...h6 too early
when the knight sacrifice at e6 is strong.

Your game follows the 6th game of Deep-Blue Kasparov, 1997 match. In
that game Kasparov suffered one of his shortest losses ever.

6. Bd3 e6 7. N1f3 h6


As the commentary on the Deep Blue-Kasparov game pointed out 7...h6 is
a grave mistake because it allows White to sacrifice at e6. I don't
believe that 8.Nxe6 has been shown to be a forced win for White, but
does put such strong pressure on Black's king that White's
compensation is more than worth the piece.

The best move from opening theory is 7...Bd6. Play typically goes
8.Qe2 h6 9.Ne4 (9.Nxe6 doesn't work as well here because after
9...fxe6 10.Bg6+ Ke7 11.O-O Black has 11...Nf8 overprotecting the pawn
and dring the bishop away. 12.Bd3 Bd7 13.Ne5 Qe8 and The black king
will go to relative safety at c7 via d8. White does not have enough
compensation for the material sacrificed.) 9...Nxe4 10.Qxe4 and Black
has a playable game. [One of the Kasparov-Karpov world championship
games had this varaition; the game ended in a draw.

8. Nxe6 ...

I did not understand why he did this! He is giving me his knight
for a pawn? At this point I thought about taking his night with
with the pawn, but I did not want to have a lone unprotected pawn.


White's main compensation is that Black's king cannot castle and will
most likely be stuck in the center where White can build up an attack.

When I searched for games with this position where one or both players
had Elo 2400 I found 27 games. Black managed to win 5 times and
draw 4 times and White owon 16 times. Also 2 of the draws and 2 of
the wins are more likely due to the fact that Black was 200 rating
points above White. Not very comforting for the Black side.

...Qe7

9. O-O ...

I had to take with the pawn otherwise he would pin my queen
against my king.

...fxe6 10. Bg6+ Kd8 11. Bf4


Two other moves have been tried by White:
a) 11.Re1
b) 11.c4 to prevent ...Nd5

b5


Somewhat better is 11...Nd5 12.Bg3 Qb4. One of the wins by Black and
one of the draws occurred in this variation.

Kasparov against Deep Blue is the only game where 11...b5 was played.

12. a4 Bb7 13. Re1 Nd5 14. Bg3 Kc8 15. axb5 cxb5 16. Qd3 Bc6
17. Bf5 exf5

I was feeling that my king was under threat so I decided to
get a rook and a bishop for my queen and also get my black
bishop into the game and to hopefully link up my rooks.


17...exf5 is relatively best.
a) 17...Nb4 18.Qc3 Qf6 19.Bh3 and White is going to break through at
e6.
b) 17...Kb7 protecting the Bc6 18.Rxe6 Qb4 19.Rxc6 Kxc6 20.Bxd7 Kxd7
21.Qf5+ and Black must give large amounts of material to avoid mate.

18. Rxe7 Bxe7 19. c4


After White's (Deep Blue's) 19th move Kasparov resigned. The game is
hopeless for Black unless White does something very stupid.

In addtion to the commentary in this message you may want to look for
annotations of the Deep Blue-kasparov game on-line. They should
explain further what Kasparov did wrong.

I agree with Kasparov's decision; the position is lost. However, in
your game White makes some minor mistakes that could have diminished
his advantage. Most of the remaining comments describe ways White
could have won more quickly.

Nb4 20. Qe2


Better is 20.Qxf5 It keeps Black's bishop from interferring with open
lines at e4. Then after 20...Kd8 (20...Rf8 21.Qe6 Bd8 22.d5 Rf6
23.Qg4 h5 24.Qh3 Bb7 25.Ne5 Rd6 26.Nf7 Rf6 27.Nd6+ Rxd6 28.Bxd6 +-)
21.d5 Rf8 22.Qe4 Bb7 23.Re1 Rf7 24.Ne5 Nxe5 25.Qxe5 Ke8 26.Qc7 Bc8
27.Bd6 +-

Be4 21. cxb5 Kd8
22. Rc1


Better was 22.Nd2 with the idea of Nxe4 or f3.

Nf6


A problem with this move is that it allows White to play Ne5. Better
was 22...Rf8 and if 23.Bc7+ Ke8 and Black can find a safer haven for
his King on the king-side, e.g., 24.Bg3 Kf7 25.Rc7 Rfd8. This
variation was probably the last point that Black might have salvaged a
draw.

23. Bc7+


23.Ne5! Rf8 24.f3 Bd5 25.Ng6 Rf7 26.Bc7+ Kd7 27.Ba5 Bd6 28.Ne5+ and
Black is going to lose at least a piece +-

Ke8 24. Ne5 Rc8

I have pined his bishop. I wanted to try Nd5, but he had other ideas.

25. b6 a6 26. Ng6


26.f3! if Bd5 27.Ng6 and Black loses a piece

Kf7
27. Nxh8+


Better 27.Nxe7 Kxe7 28.f3 which wins a piece rather than just an
exchange.

Rxh8 28. Be5 Rg8 29. Qd1 Rd8 30. Qb3+ Bd5 31. Qa4 Ne8
32. Rc3 Kf8

I wanted to hide behind my wall of pieces.

33. Bc7 Ra8 34. Qd7 Be4 35. Qe6


Better 35.Re3 Nf6 36.Qe6 Re8 37.Rxe4 fxe4 38.b7 must give up his rook
after the b-pawn queens.

Bf6 36. g4 Nd3
37. gxf5 Nxf2

My idea here was to protect the bishop and hopefully he would
fall for taking my knight with his king and then I would fork
his rook.


You need to look further. After after 38.Kxf2 Bxd4+ 39.Kf1 Bxc3
White has the zwischenzug 40.Qxe4! which threatens the rook at a8
before recapturing at c3. After 40...Rc8 41.bxc3 Black is completely
lost.

In this position it did not matter as much (Black was lost in any
case); however, you might benefit from practicing calculating tactical
positions until they reach a point where no more exchanges are
possible. Especially look for zwischenzugs that dramatically change
the evalaution of resulting positions.


38. Bd6+ Nxd6 39. Qxd6+ Be7 40. Qc7 Nd1
41. b7 Nxc3 42. bxa8=Q+ Bxa8 43. bxc3 Bf3 44. Qc8+ Kf7
45. Qxa6 Bg5 46. c4 Be3+

Finally I go on the offensive and get my first check!

47. Kf1 Bg5 48. d5 Bf6 49. Qe6+ Kf8
50. d6 Bd8 51. Qd7 Bg5 52. Qc8+ Kf7 53. d7 Be7 54. Qe8+ Kf6
55. Qg6+ Ke5 56. Qe6+ Kf4 57. Qxe7 g5

I wanted to hide behind some pawns.

58. pxpep Bg4

He did not go for it.

59. d8=Q Bh3+

My last gasp to get a check!

60. Kf2 Bd7 61. Qe3+ Kf5 62. Qf8+ Kg4
63. Qf4+ Kh5 64. Qxh6# 1-0

Well at least I lasted 63 and a half moves! Where was my big mistake? Was
losing my queen the turning point of the game, even though I got good
material for her in return?




  #4   Report Post  
Old July 25th 04, 07:46 AM
David Pollitt
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis Requested from Mike Ogush and other people.

Mike Ogush ) writes:
On 23 Jul 2004 04:35:40 GMT, (David Pollitt)
wrote:

I found reading Mike Ogush's analysis very helpful in posts he has made
here before, and I was wondering if you could help me as well.
If you could help me know where I went wrong in this game I would
be thankful. I felt that I had an early lead, and then I got his bishop,
knight, and a rook for my queen. But I lost anyway. What should I have
done differently?

White: John B.
Black: David P.

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7
5. Ng5 Ngf6

I thought he was unwise to advance his knight instead of continuing to
develop.

5.Ng5 is a perfectly legitimate move. Among the strong GMs who have
played this multiple times as white: Adams, Anand, Deep Blue,
Ivanchuk, Kamsky, Khalifman, Shirov, TJudit Polgar,Timman,Topolov.
Karpov, Seirawan, and Speelman are the strongest players, who have
faced the Black side.

One of White's ideas is to provoke Black into playing ...h6 too early
when the knight sacrifice at e6 is strong.

Your game follows the 6th game of Deep-Blue Kasparov, 1997 match. In
that game Kasparov suffered one of his shortest losses ever.

6. Bd3 e6 7. N1f3 h6


As the commentary on the Deep Blue-Kasparov game pointed out 7...h6 is
a grave mistake because it allows White to sacrifice at e6. I don't
believe that 8.Nxe6 has been shown to be a forced win for White, but
does put such strong pressure on Black's king that White's
compensation is more than worth the piece.

The best move from opening theory is 7...Bd6. Play typically goes
8.Qe2 h6 9.Ne4 (9.Nxe6 doesn't work as well here because after
9...fxe6 10.Bg6+ Ke7 11.O-O Black has 11...Nf8 overprotecting the pawn
and driving the bishop away. 12.Bd3 Bd7 13.Ne5 Qe8 and The black king
will go to relative safety at c7 via d8. White does not have enough
compensation for the material sacrificed.) 9...Nxe4 10.Qxe4 and Black
has a playable game. [One of the Kasparov-Karpov world championship
games had this varaition; the game ended in a draw.


What web site can I go to see that game?

8. Nxe6 ...

I did not understand why he did this! He is giving me his knight
for a pawn? At this point I thought about taking his night with
with the pawn, but I did not want to have a lone unprotected pawn.

White's main compensation is that Black's king cannot castle and will
most likely be stuck in the center where White can build up an attack.

When I searched for games with this position where one or both players
had Elo 2400 I found 27 games. Black managed to win 5 times and
draw 4 times and White won 16 times. Also 2 of the draws and 2 of
the wins are more likely due to the fact that Black was 200 rating
points above White. Not very comforting for the Black side.


Why did Garry chose to do h7 if he knew this? Garry has an extremely good
knowledge of openings, so I am surprised that he made this mistake
instead of playing 7...Bd6 as you recommend.

...Qe7

9. O-O ...

I had to take with the pawn otherwise he would pin my queen
against my king.

...fxe6 10. Bg6+ Kd8 11. Bf4


Two other moves have been tried by White:
a) 11.Re1
b) 11.c4 to prevent ...Nd5


What are the implications of these two moves? If Deep Blue had played them
would the computer have still won?

b5


Somewhat better is 11...Nd5 12.Bg3 Qb4. One of the wins by Black and
one of the draws occurred in this variation.

Kasparov against Deep Blue is the only game where 11...b5 was played.


Why did he play b5 instead of Nd5? Did Garry not know it was better?

12. a4 Bb7 13. Re1 Nd5 14. Bg3 Kc8 15. axb5 cxb5 16. Qd3 Bc6
17. Bf5 exf5

I was feeling that my king was under threat so I decided to
get a rook and a bishop for my queen and also get my black
bishop into the game and to hopefully link up my rooks.


17...exf5 is relatively best.
a) 17...Nb4 18.Qc3 Qf6 19.Bh3 and White is going to break through at
e6.
b) 17...Kb7 protecting the Bc6 18.Rxe6 Qb4 19.Rxc6 Kxc6 20.Bxd7 Kxd7
21.Qf5+ and Black must give large amounts of material to avoid mate.

18. Rxe7 Bxe7 19. c4


After White's (Deep Blue's) 19th move Kasparov resigned. The game is
hopeless for Black unless White does something very stupid.

In addition to the commentary in this message you may want to look for
annotations of the Deep Blue-kasparov game on-line. They should
explain further what Kasparov did wrong.


I have read them. I was wondering if the match video is available
anywhere? I have also read parts of the Deep Blue book.

I agree with Kasparov's decision; the position is lost. However, in
your game White makes some minor mistakes that could have diminished
his advantage. Most of the remaining comments describe ways White
could have won more quickly.

Nb4 20. Qe2


Better is 20.Qxf5 It keeps Black's bishop from interferring with open
lines at e4. Then after 20...Kd8 (20...Rf8 21.Qe6 Bd8 22.d5 Rf6
23.Qg4 h5 24.Qh3 Bb7 25.Ne5 Rd6 26.Nf7 Rf6 27.Nd6+ Rxd6 28.Bxd6 +-)
21.d5 Rf8 22.Qe4 Bb7 23.Re1 Rf7 24.Ne5 Nxe5 25.Qxe5 Ke8 26.Qc7 Bc8
27.Bd6 +-


What does "+-" mean? I've seen it before but I am not sure what it means.

Be4 21. cxb5 Kd8
22. Rc1


Better was 22.Nd2 with the idea of Nxe4 or f3.

Nf6


A problem with this move is that it allows White to play Ne5. Better
was 22...Rf8 and if 23.Bc7+ Ke8 and Black can find a safer haven for
his King on the king-side, e.g., 24.Bg3 Kf7 25.Rc7 Rfd8. This
variation was probably the last point that Black might have salvaged a
draw.

23. Bc7+


23.Ne5! Rf8 24.f3 Bd5 25.Ng6 Rf7 26.Bc7+ Kd7 27.Ba5 Bd6 28.Ne5+ and
Black is going to lose at least a piece +-

Ke8 24. Ne5 Rc8

I have pined his bishop. I wanted to try Nd5, but he had other ideas.

25. b6 a6 26. Ng6


26.f3! if Bd5 27.Ng6 and Black loses a piece

Kf7
27. Nxh8+


Better 27.Nxe7 Kxe7 28.f3 which wins a piece rather than just an
exchange.

Rxh8 28. Be5 Rg8 29. Qd1 Rd8 30. Qb3+ Bd5 31. Qa4 Ne8
32. Rc3 Kf8

I wanted to hide behind my wall of pieces.

33. Bc7 Ra8 34. Qd7 Be4 35. Qe6


Better 35.Re3 Nf6 36.Qe6 Re8 37.Rxe4 fxe4 38.b7 must give up his rook
after the b-pawn queens.

Bf6 36. g4 Nd3
37. gxf5 Nxf2

My idea here was to protect the bishop and hopefully he would
fall for taking my knight with his king and then I would fork
his rook.


You need to look further. After after 38.Kxf2 Bxd4+ 39.Kf1 Bxc3
White has the zwischenzug 40.Qxe4! which threatens the rook at a8
before recapturing at c3. After 40...Rc8 41.bxc3 Black is completely
lost.

In this position it did not matter as much (Black was lost in any
case); however, you might benefit from practicing calculating tactical
positions until they reach a point where no more exchanges are
possible. Especially look for zwischenzugs that dramatically change
the evalaution of resulting positions.


38. Bd6+ Nxd6 39. Qxd6+ Be7 40. Qc7 Nd1
41. b7 Nxc3 42. bxa8=Q+ Bxa8 43. bxc3 Bf3 44. Qc8+ Kf7
45. Qxa6 Bg5 46. c4 Be3+

Finally I go on the offensive and get my first check!

47. Kf1 Bg5 48. d5 Bf6 49. Qe6+ Kf8
50. d6 Bd8 51. Qd7 Bg5 52. Qc8+ Kf7 53. d7 Be7 54. Qe8+ Kf6
55. Qg6+ Ke5 56. Qe6+ Kf4 57. Qxe7 g5

I wanted to hide behind some pawns.

58. pxpep Bg4

He did not go for it.

59. d8=Q Bh3+

My last gasp to get a check!

60. Kf2 Bd7 61. Qe3+ Kf5 62. Qf8+ Kg4
63. Qf4+ Kh5 64. Qxh6# 1-0

Well at least I lasted 63 and a half moves! Where was my big mistake? Was
losing my queen the turning point of the game, even though I got good
material for her in return?




  #5   Report Post  
Old July 26th 04, 06:15 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis Requested from Mike Ogush and other people.

On 25 Jul 2004 06:46:01 GMT, (David Pollitt)
wrote:

Mike Ogush ) writes:
On 23 Jul 2004 04:35:40 GMT,
(David Pollitt)
wrote:

I found reading Mike Ogush's analysis very helpful in posts he has made
here before, and I was wondering if you could help me as well.
If you could help me know where I went wrong in this game I would
be thankful. I felt that I had an early lead, and then I got his bishop,
knight, and a rook for my queen. But I lost anyway. What should I have
done differently?

White: John B.
Black: David P.

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7
5. Ng5 Ngf6

I thought he was unwise to advance his knight instead of continuing to
develop.

5.Ng5 is a perfectly legitimate move. Among the strong GMs who have
played this multiple times as white: Adams, Anand, Deep Blue,
Ivanchuk, Kamsky, Khalifman, Shirov, TJudit Polgar,Timman,Topolov.
Karpov, Seirawan, and Speelman are the strongest players, who have
faced the Black side.

One of White's ideas is to provoke Black into playing ...h6 too early
when the knight sacrifice at e6 is strong.

Your game follows the 6th game of Deep-Blue Kasparov, 1997 match. In
that game Kasparov suffered one of his shortest losses ever.

6. Bd3 e6 7. N1f3 h6


As the commentary on the Deep Blue-Kasparov game pointed out 7...h6 is
a grave mistake because it allows White to sacrifice at e6. I don't
believe that 8.Nxe6 has been shown to be a forced win for White, but
does put such strong pressure on Black's king that White's
compensation is more than worth the piece.

The best move from opening theory is 7...Bd6. Play typically goes
8.Qe2 h6 9.Ne4 (9.Nxe6 doesn't work as well here because after
9...fxe6 10.Bg6+ Ke7 11.O-O Black has 11...Nf8 overprotecting the pawn
and driving the bishop away. 12.Bd3 Bd7 13.Ne5 Qe8 and The black king
will go to relative safety at c7 via d8. White does not have enough
compensation for the material sacrificed.) 9...Nxe4 10.Qxe4 and Black
has a playable game. [One of the Kasparov-Karpov world championship
games had this varaition; the game ended in a draw.


What web site can I go to see that game?


Minor mistake on my part. It wasn't a world championship game between
Kasparov and Karpov. Rather it was a game at Amsterdam, 1988. You
should be able to find the game on-line by going to one of the on-line
games collection and searching for the game.


8. Nxe6 ...

I did not understand why he did this! He is giving me his knight
for a pawn? At this point I thought about taking his night with
with the pawn, but I did not want to have a lone unprotected pawn.

White's main compensation is that Black's king cannot castle and will
most likely be stuck in the center where White can build up an attack.

When I searched for games with this position where one or both players
had Elo 2400 I found 27 games. Black managed to win 5 times and
draw 4 times and White won 16 times. Also 2 of the draws and 2 of
the wins are more likely due to the fact that Black was 200 rating
points above White. Not very comforting for the Black side.


Why did Garry chose to do h7 if he knew this? Garry has an extremely good
knowledge of openings, so I am surprised that he made this mistake
instead of playing 7...Bd6 as you recommend.


At the tiime of the match there were several suggestions why Gary made
this move:
1) no experience playing the black side of this variation of the
Caro-Kann and he just forgot that Bd6 must be played first before
kincking the knight.
2) playing an opening that doesn't suit his style. The Caro-Kann
requires more patient maneuvering than the Sicilian (Gary's mainstay)
3) Gary was still psychologically affected by the second game in which
he resigned when he had a forced draw and all the hoopla around
"proving" that Deep Blue wasn't cheating.

...Qe7

9. O-O ...

I had to take with the pawn otherwise he would pin my queen
against my king.

...fxe6 10. Bg6+ Kd8 11. Bf4


Two other moves have been tried by White:
a) 11.Re1
b) 11.c4 to prevent ...Nd5


What are the implications of these two moves? If Deep Blue had played them
would the computer have still won?


Probably Deep Blue would still have won. Regarding the implications
of the move:

At the position after Black's 10th in BigDatabase2001 (from Chessbase)
there are
49 gamesWhite's performance over these games is 78%.
22 of the games had 11.Bf4 with performance of 82%
16 of the games had 11.c4 with performance of 84%
8 of the games had 11.Re1 with performance of 63%
2 of the games had 11.Ne5 with performance of 50%

b5


Somewhat better is 11...Nd5 12.Bg3 Qb4. One of the wins by Black and
one of the draws occurred in this variation.

Kasparov against Deep Blue is the only game where 11...b5 was played.


Why did he play b5 instead of Nd5? Did Garry not know it was better?


If he were in an objective state of mind he probably would have known
better, but Kasparov was in an unusual situation for him of defending
against a strong attack in an opening that is usually much more
passove that Kasparov is used to.

12. a4 Bb7 13. Re1 Nd5 14. Bg3 Kc8 15. axb5 cxb5 16. Qd3 Bc6
17. Bf5 exf5

I was feeling that my king was under threat so I decided to
get a rook and a bishop for my queen and also get my black
bishop into the game and to hopefully link up my rooks.


17...exf5 is relatively best.
a) 17...Nb4 18.Qc3 Qf6 19.Bh3 and White is going to break through at
e6.
b) 17...Kb7 protecting the Bc6 18.Rxe6 Qb4 19.Rxc6 Kxc6 20.Bxd7 Kxd7
21.Qf5+ and Black must give large amounts of material to avoid mate.

18. Rxe7 Bxe7 19. c4


After White's (Deep Blue's) 19th move Kasparov resigned. The game is
hopeless for Black unless White does something very stupid.

In addition to the commentary in this message you may want to look for
annotations of the Deep Blue-kasparov game on-line. They should
explain further what Kasparov did wrong.


I have read them. I was wondering if the match video is available
anywhere? I have also read parts of the Deep Blue book.

I agree with Kasparov's decision; the position is lost. However, in
your game White makes some minor mistakes that could have diminished
his advantage. Most of the remaining comments describe ways White
could have won more quickly.

Nb4 20. Qe2


Better is 20.Qxf5 It keeps Black's bishop from interferring with open
lines at e4. Then after 20...Kd8 (20...Rf8 21.Qe6 Bd8 22.d5 Rf6
23.Qg4 h5 24.Qh3 Bb7 25.Ne5 Rd6 26.Nf7 Rf6 27.Nd6+ Rxd6 28.Bxd6 +-)
21.d5 Rf8 22.Qe4 Bb7 23.Re1 Rf7 24.Ne5 Nxe5 25.Qxe5 Ke8 26.Qc7 Bc8
27.Bd6 +-


What does "+-" mean? I've seen it before but I am not sure what it means.


+- means White is winning
+/- means white has a strong advantage
(the symbol is actually a plus over minus)
+/= means white has a small advantage

Be4 21. cxb5 Kd8
22. Rc1


Better was 22.Nd2 with the idea of Nxe4 or f3.

Nf6


A problem with this move is that it allows White to play Ne5. Better
was 22...Rf8 and if 23.Bc7+ Ke8 and Black can find a safer haven for
his King on the king-side, e.g., 24.Bg3 Kf7 25.Rc7 Rfd8. This
variation was probably the last point that Black might have salvaged a
draw.

23. Bc7+


23.Ne5! Rf8 24.f3 Bd5 25.Ng6 Rf7 26.Bc7+ Kd7 27.Ba5 Bd6 28.Ne5+ and
Black is going to lose at least a piece +-

Ke8 24. Ne5 Rc8

I have pined his bishop. I wanted to try Nd5, but he had other ideas.

25. b6 a6 26. Ng6


26.f3! if Bd5 27.Ng6 and Black loses a piece

Kf7
27. Nxh8+


Better 27.Nxe7 Kxe7 28.f3 which wins a piece rather than just an
exchange.

Rxh8 28. Be5 Rg8 29. Qd1 Rd8 30. Qb3+ Bd5 31. Qa4 Ne8
32. Rc3 Kf8

I wanted to hide behind my wall of pieces.

33. Bc7 Ra8 34. Qd7 Be4 35. Qe6


Better 35.Re3 Nf6 36.Qe6 Re8 37.Rxe4 fxe4 38.b7 must give up his rook
after the b-pawn queens.

Bf6 36. g4 Nd3
37. gxf5 Nxf2

My idea here was to protect the bishop and hopefully he would
fall for taking my knight with his king and then I would fork
his rook.


You need to look further. After after 38.Kxf2 Bxd4+ 39.Kf1 Bxc3
White has the zwischenzug 40.Qxe4! which threatens the rook at a8
before recapturing at c3. After 40...Rc8 41.bxc3 Black is completely
lost.

In this position it did not matter as much (Black was lost in any
case); however, you might benefit from practicing calculating tactical
positions until they reach a point where no more exchanges are
possible. Especially look for zwischenzugs that dramatically change
the evalaution of resulting positions.


38. Bd6+ Nxd6 39. Qxd6+ Be7 40. Qc7 Nd1
41. b7 Nxc3 42. bxa8=Q+ Bxa8 43. bxc3 Bf3 44. Qc8+ Kf7
45. Qxa6 Bg5 46. c4 Be3+

Finally I go on the offensive and get my first check!

47. Kf1 Bg5 48. d5 Bf6 49. Qe6+ Kf8
50. d6 Bd8 51. Qd7 Bg5 52. Qc8+ Kf7 53. d7 Be7 54. Qe8+ Kf6
55. Qg6+ Ke5 56. Qe6+ Kf4 57. Qxe7 g5

I wanted to hide behind some pawns.

58. pxpep Bg4

He did not go for it.

59. d8=Q Bh3+

My last gasp to get a check!

60. Kf2 Bd7 61. Qe3+ Kf5 62. Qf8+ Kg4
63. Qf4+ Kh5 64. Qxh6# 1-0

Well at least I lasted 63 and a half moves! Where was my big mistake? Was
losing my queen the turning point of the game, even though I got good
material for her in return?





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