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Old October 7th 06, 10:07 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

Wow, second time in a row Topalov is "lucky" enough to have Kramnik slam
into his home preparation. This one was all but over by the sixteenth move,
and shows what happens when a player establishes superiority in the opening:

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 Bf5 5.Nc3 e6 6.Nh4 Bg6 7.Nxg6 hxg6 8.a3 Nbd7
9.g3 Be7 10.f4 dxc4 11.Bxc4 0-0 12.e4 b5 13.Be2 b4 14.axb4 Bxb4 15.Bf3 Qb6
16.0-0 e5 17.Be3 Rad8 18.Na4 Qb8 19.Qc2 exf4 20.Bxf4 Qb7 21.Rad1 Rfe8 22.Bg5
Be7 23.Kh1 Nh7 24.Be3 Bg5 25.Bg1 Nhf8 26.h4 Be7 27.e5 Nb8 28.Nc3 Bb4 29.Qg2
Qc8 30.Rc1 Bxc3 31.bxc3 Ne6 32.Bg4 Qc7 33.Rcd1 Nd7 34.Qa2 Nb6 35.Rf3 Nf8
36.Rdf1 Re7 37.Be3 Nh7 38.Rxf7 Nd5 39.R7f3 1-0


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Old October 7th 06, 10:55 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" wrote:
Wow, second time in a row Topalov is "lucky" enough to have Kramnik slam
into his home preparation. This one was all but over by the sixteenth move,
and shows what happens when a player establishes superiority in the opening:


Topalov has the advantage after 16...e5. However, if Topalov asked me
to play a few turns for him while he went to the restroom, I imagine he
would not like the position when he returned!

{Assuming I didn't resign his game outright to make up for game #5}

---
likesforests
Become a Chess Expert -- http://likesforests.blogspot.com/

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Old October 7th 06, 11:40 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

Wow, second time in a row Topalov is "lucky" enough to have Kramnik slam
into his home preparation. This one was all but over by the sixteenth
move,
and shows what happens when a player establishes superiority in the
opening:


Topalov has the advantage after 16...e5. However, if Topalov asked me
to play a few turns for him while he went to the restroom, I imagine he
would not like the position when he returned!


I don't know, as his position all but played itself today. Kramnik is
looking weaker and weaker in the opening (he wasn't very impressive against
Leko either and should have lost the last game).

I would say that this match is beginning to show the need for one to become
very strong in the openings before they get to the point that their
middlegame or endgame technique will get them the win. What good is it to
be strong in a phase of the game if you're going to consistently enter that
phase at -0.90 according to the silicon?

Topalov has won two games in a row now, wire to wire, and could easily be up
by four games if he hadn't overextended or blundered in games 1-2.


--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "loser AFCs pay my rent."



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Old October 8th 06, 01:48 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" wrote:
Wow, second time in a row Topalov is "lucky" enough to have Kramnik slam
into his home preparation. This one was all but over by the sixteenth move,
and shows what happens when a player establishes superiority in the opening:

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 Bf5 5.Nc3 e6 6.Nh4 Bg6 7.Nxg6 hxg6 8.a3 Nbd7
9.g3 Be7 10.f4 dxc4 11.Bxc4 0-0 12.e4 b5 13.Be2 b4 14.axb4 Bxb4 15.Bf3 Qb6
16.0-0 e5 17.Be3 Rad8 18.Na4 Qb8 19.Qc2 exf4 20.Bxf4 Qb7 21.Rad1 Rfe8 22.Bg5
Be7 23.Kh1 Nh7 24.Be3 Bg5 25.Bg1 Nhf8 26.h4 Be7 27.e5 Nb8 28.Nc3 Bb4 29.Qg2
Qc8 30.Rc1 Bxc3 31.bxc3 Ne6 32.Bg4 Qc7 33.Rcd1 Nd7 34.Qa2 Nb6 35.Rf3 Nf8
36.Rdf1 Re7 37.Be3 Nh7 38.Rxf7 Nd5 39.R7f3 1-0




For those who are interested
A sort analysis with Chessmaster 10 (1 minute per move) identified the
following error by black on move 35. Didnt identify anything major
before move 35. But thats chess software for you

Analysis:

Sco 2.63 36.Rdf1 Re7 37.Be3 Rdd7 38.Bg5 Re6 39.h5 gxh5 40.Bxh5 g6
41.Bg4 c5 42.Bxe6 Nxe6 (Time = 0:38, Depth = 3/11)

Auto Annotation:

Pins own pawn at f7 and puts the knight on the edge of the board.
Leads to 36.Rdf1 Re7 37.Be3 Rdd7 38.Bg5 Re6 39.h5 gxh5 40.Bxh5 g6 41.Bg4
c5 42.Bxe6 Nxe6, which wins a pawn for a rook and a pawn. Better is Nd5,
leading to 36.Ra1 f5 37.Bh3 c5 38.Qxa7 cxd4 39.cxd4 Qc2 40.Qb7, which
wins a pawn for two pawns. This was black's only meaningful error. Even
though the game was within reach here, black eventually resigned.


--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

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Old October 8th 06, 01:54 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine


For those who are interested
A sort analysis with Chessmaster 10 (1 minute per move) identified the
following error by black on move 35. Didnt identify anything major before
move 35. But thats chess software for you


The engines were starting to show Black in trouble by move 15, if not
earlier.


--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "loser AFCs pay my rent."





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Old October 8th 06, 02:45 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" wrote:

Topalov has the advantage after 16...e5. However, if Topalov asked me
to play a few turns for him while he went to the restroom, I imagine he
would not like the position when he returned!


I don't know, as his position all but played itself today. Kramnik is
looking weaker and weaker in the opening (he wasn't very impressive against
Leko either and should have lost the last game).
very strong in the openings before they get to the point that their
middlegame or endgame technique will get them the win.


I played after 16...Rad8 against Rybka (8s/move):

18.Na4 Qb5 19.Be2 Qb7 20.Be2 Qb7 21.fxe4 Nxe5 22.Qb3 Ng4 23.Bf3 Qb5.
Apparently, I've already lost the advantage.

Comparing to the text: 18.Na4 Qb8 19.Qc2 exf4 20.Bxf4 Qb7 21.Rad1 Rfe8
22.Bg5 Be7 23.Kh1 Nh7

Kramnik's play on moves 18-23 looks way more passive than Rybka's play.
Kramnik's minor pieces seem to be doing a full-scale retreat.

---
likesforests
Become a Chess Expert - http://likesforests.blogspot.com/

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Old October 8th 06, 03:05 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2006
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Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

Topalov has the advantage after 16...e5. However, if Topalov asked me
to play a few turns for him while he went to the restroom, I imagine he
would not like the position when he returned!


I don't know, as his position all but played itself today. Kramnik is
looking weaker and weaker in the opening (he wasn't very impressive
against
Leko either and should have lost the last game).
very strong in the openings before they get to the point that their
middlegame or endgame technique will get them the win.


I played after 16...Rad8 against Rybka (8s/move):

18.Na4 Qb5 19.Be2 Qb7 20.Be2 Qb7 21.fxe4 Nxe5 22.Qb3 Ng4 23.Bf3 Qb5.
Apparently, I've already lost the advantage.


Given the edge Topalov had, that's impressive.


Comparing to the text: 18.Na4 Qb8 19.Qc2 exf4 20.Bxf4 Qb7 21.Rad1 Rfe8
22.Bg5 Be7 23.Kh1 Nh7

Kramnik's play on moves 18-23 looks way more passive than Rybka's play.
Kramnik's minor pieces seem to be doing a full-scale retreat.


Kramnik was toast by move 15. White had a Bishop pair, better activity, a
bigger center, and Black had chopped-up pawn structure. White's position
looked like something out of a textbook, while Kramnik's looked like a train
wreck.

The reason I've been confident about Topalov is that he's obviously much
more booked up than Kramnik, and people who think that intuition can compete
against home preparation are getting a reality check.

I remember when Nakamura played last year or the year before for the world
title. I remember thinking that if he couldn't get ahead of me (with 13
years of rust, no less) in 22 moves with White (he did win in 28 finally),
he sure wasn't going to do it against Adams and the other players he had to
face there.

I've also long believed that the process of "booking up" if done properly,
will incorporate all the middlegame and endgame a player would ever need, IF
he doesn't use an avoidance scheme: i.e., if he's willing to play any type
of opening he considers objectively best, such as doubled pawns, bishop
pairs, accepting and offering sacrifices, middlegames with or without
queens, etc., and with no bias. A guy who always aims for a certain type of
opening will not gain this knowledge, which is why many who study that way
don't see the opening as important.


--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "loser AFCs pay my rent."



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Old October 8th 06, 09:44 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 162
Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

En/na Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" ha escrit:
Wow, second time in a row Topalov is "lucky" enough to have Kramnik slam
into his home preparation. This one was all but over by the sixteenth move,
and shows what happens when a player establishes superiority in the opening:


It seems that Topa was helped by a mistake in 30th black move.

Ray, why do not you study more chess to become GM as soon as possible,
and stop writing stupid rules?

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Old October 8th 06, 09:48 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 162
Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

En/na Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" ha escrit:

For those who are interested
A sort analysis with Chessmaster 10 (1 minute per move) identified the
following error by black on move 35. Didnt identify anything major before
move 35. But thats chess software for you



The engines were starting to show Black in trouble by move 15, if not
earlier.


My "brain-engin"e show your mind is in trouble Ray.

What's the evaluation of your engine after move 1?
Maybe something like +99 or 0.00 solves chess

AT

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Old October 8th 06, 10:18 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 710
Default The 1/x rule strikes AGAIN: Topalov Routes Kramnik In Game Nine

Wow, second time in a row Topalov is "lucky" enough to have Kramnik slam
into his home preparation. This one was all but over by the sixteenth
move, and shows what happens when a player establishes superiority in the
opening:


It seems that Topa was helped by a mistake in 30th black move.


A mistake caused by the strong opening played in the 29 before it.

Move 30 is not most important until move 29 has been made.


--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "loser AFCs pay my rent."



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