Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old October 8th 06, 09:08 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 59
Default chess problem terminology

I am having fun composing tentative chess problems. I started a few
weekends ago and I am a bit confused by the obscure chess problem
terminology.

I am trying to learn the theme "switchback" and I composed the
following direct 3# to illustrate it (if I am not wrong):

8/2N2Q2/2b1B3/2p1k3/5R2/2Kp4/4Pr2/8

Can anyone please tell me whether this is a "switchback" or not
(understood as a "theme") ?
I am not sure whether the term aplies also to the black.
Thank you in advance.

José Potrosal

  #2   Report Post  
Old October 9th 06, 08:08 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 567
Default chess problem terminology


Hello Jose!

A black switchback in that position is trivial, and not thematic.

I sometimes write articles for state magazines, Internet sites etc. in
addition to what I publish in the world's leading problem magazines,
mainly to show OTB players how chess problems are not always obscure,
and can improve their play.

Here is a problem I used to illustrate the switchback theme:

FEN: 7k/5Kpr/5pQ1/4p1b1/6P1/8/8/8 w - - 0 1

Here are the main lines (mate in 5)

1. Ke6 {threatening Qe8#(#1)} Rh6 2. Qe8+ Kh7 3.Kf7 Rg6 (3... Rh5 4.
Qf8/g8+ ) 4. Qg8+ Kh6 5. Qh8

It is not an ideal version of a switchback by any means. But it seemed
very game-like, and thus, players might enjoy it.

As to king flights by black, star and L pattern flights are considered
to be aesthetic. Here is a small mate in 2 that shows star flights of
the black king:

FEN:8/8/8/5N2/6p1/6B1/4N1k1/1BK5 w - - 0 1


1. Kd2 Kf1 2. Ne3#
(1...Kf3 2. Nh4#
(1... Kh3 2.Nf4#
(1... Kh1 2. Be4#


You can see that the key move takes no flights away from black, and he
can move to each of the 4 white squares surrounding him in the pattern
of a star, but is always mated..

Today the most popular "switchback-type movement" is the rundlauf,
where a piece takes a circuitous route back home. The paradox is - if
the piece didn't stand initially in a good spot, why would it return to
its home square?

If I can help you anymore Jose, let me know.

  #3   Report Post  
Old October 9th 06, 09:37 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 59
Default chess problem terminology


Thank you very much for your answer, you are becoming a kind of mentor
to me...

Finally I decided to read about chess problems and I even bought some
books. It would be great if I could compose a problem of the "modern
themes". Maybe I can find some time next sunday to have a try.

I liked your "switchback". I think I can appreciate the idea. I have
also found the problem in a Virginia Chess magazine. I am a bit
confused by the existence of dual solutions (if I am using the terms
appropriately), but I guess it is not important if they are not in the
main thematic line. I couldn't understand the function of the pawn at
e5 since the problem seems to work just fine even without it, and then
for the sake of economy... I just mention these because these are the
kind of things that I am considering when I am testing new
compositions, but now I am not sure whether it is always the way to go.

As for the other problem, I think I understant its beauty. Different
mates, and the key move does not take flights away for the black king,
something I have found difficult to compose.

As for my trivial black switchback I'll include it in my booklet (chess
pellets) that is becoming my own history in the long way of chess
composition. I will also include a mate in five with a quiet key move,
two lines of play, economy and no duals:

83R45K285pp17k5r23Q white to play and mate in five moves.

JP

  #5   Report Post  
Old October 11th 06, 10:50 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 59
Default chess problem terminology


I will also include a mate in five with a quiet key move,
two lines of play, economy and no duals:

83R45K285pp17k5r23Q white to play and mate in five moves.


The correct Forsyth notation is: 8/3R4/5K2/8/5pp1/7k/5r2/3Q4

I have a guess that this problem is very amenable to be converted into
a white-to-play-and-win kind of problem if you give more strength to
black, e.g.:

8/3R4/5K2/8/5pp1/n6k/ppP2r2/3Q4 (the same mate in five for white still
holds)

Perhaps (but this I cannot find out) if white doesn't find the mate in
its first move by playing too agresively, black can always find the way
to win (or draw) the game.



  #6   Report Post  
Old October 12th 06, 01:18 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 567
Default chess problem terminology


That is better than any of the others, although you do have the
drawback of taking a flight square for the BK - h4. But it gets better
all the time....

  #8   Report Post  
Old October 12th 06, 08:35 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 59
Default chess problem terminology

wrote:

Why not place the WQ on a4 and the WK at g5? The key Qd1 is more
attractive to me.....


I had the feeling that a King key-move in this sort of position was
"softer". It is true that, in contrast to your suggestion, it takes a
flight square for the black king, what I certainly didn't like. My
reasoning was that leaving the queen on d1 added a reasonable try:
Qh1+. For the very same reason the WR is on d7, making of Rh7+ another
plausible try. I was trying to mislead the white player to check the
black King. The "problem-factor" (I suppose this is self-explicative)
may help the solver to rule them out automatically, and then I like
more your key-move .

I surprised myself thinking in terms of a "playable position" instead
of "problem purity", I think it has to do with this particular pattern
of pieces that reminds me of an end-game position (although I haven't
read anything about them and I was just guessing). The picture you are
getting of my way of thinking is very accurate. I have always loved all
kind of geometrical recreations and mathematical games in general (I am
not a mathematician, though). I had read something about chess problems
but never considered it since the day I posted that first try here.

So I think I'll leave this position in the cellar for a while before
including it in my collection.

Thank you very much again for your kind encouragement.

  #9   Report Post  
Old October 12th 06, 07:44 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 567
Default chess problem terminology

So I think I'll leave this position in the cellar for a while before
including it in my collection.

Thank you very much again for your kind encouragement.


You are a very smart man, Jose. I was told to "put certain positions in
the cellar" when I first started composing but wanted to publish
quickly. As a result, my early efforts in problemdom are very shaky,
and downright embarrassing!

You are correct in that this looks like an endgame type position. One
composer who often uses such matrices is B. Kozdon, a German
International Master who is very highly regarded. If you like those,
you might want to look at some of his directmates; they look simple,
but have a complexity that belies the minimal material (especially for
the white side) that he uses.

Have fun with your composing...

  #10   Report Post  
Old October 12th 06, 10:41 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 59
Default chess problem terminology

Have fun with your composing...


Today is a national holiday (I'm in Barcelona) and I could stay home
composing. Yes, I had fun, but I'll have to slow down, my wife is
already complaining that "I play too much chess".
This one took me about seven hours, from deciding what to do to the
final result. I had to keep changing the plans during all the way.
I am not very happy with this position because I could not eliminate
some duals (but they arise after non-thematic black defenses and can
even somehow be considered equivalent mates). But I post it because I
won´t work further on it. I think I have learned a lot. Since my
technique skills are very limited I am aware that I must exercise.
I wanted to create a 2# with phases of play and so on, the so-called
"modern themes" if I am not wrong. I studied different diagrams in
one of the chess books I bought, in which the positions are classified
by themes. As a novice I found particularly easy to visualize the
"Banny theme". After having a careful look at some diagrams I
learned how to distill the important thematic pieces to those needed
for the sake of problem correctness and then I worked the other way
round with my own composition.

8/4N3/K3p1N1/4P3/2pnk1b1/8/Q1PPB1P1/BR5R (please consider it as a mere
exercise)

Let's see if I understood it:

Try: 1. Qxc4 [A]; But 1. ... Bxe2 [a] ! (unique refutation)
Try: 1. Rh4 [b]; But 1. ... Nxe2 [b] ! (unique refutation)

Key move: 1. Rbe1! (unique)
If 1. ... Bxe2 [a] or 1. ... Nxe2 [b] then 2. Rh4 [b] # or 2. Qxc4
[A] # (unique mates)

I thing I am beginning to see what this is all about. Needless to say I
am even more impressed by the work of the true chess composers.

Please do not hesitate to correct me if I am wrong with any of the
previous concepts.

Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
List of Authors Banned or Blacklisted by USCF Sales Sam Sloan rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 102 June 12th 06 03:34 AM
Chess256, by Mats Winther Mats Winther rec.games.chess.computer (Computer Chess) 0 May 25th 06 11:12 AM
"Swedish Chess", by Mats Winther Mats Winther rec.games.chess.computer (Computer Chess) 0 May 25th 06 11:09 AM
rec.games.chess.misc FAQ [2/4] [email protected] rec.games.chess.misc (Chess General) 0 February 19th 06 05:44 AM
Wikipedia Biography of Eric Schiller Sam Sloan rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 2 December 22nd 05 08:02 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:36 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Chess"

 

Copyright © 2017