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Old November 3rd 06, 03:30 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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Posts: 124
Default A game I should have lost

I've been working on attacking, but got to crazy in this game. My opponent
let me back into the game with a blunder on move 23, but the game was still
pretty neat. How was my tactics? Also is Learn Chess Tactics by John Nunn a
good tactics book?


[Event "GCS"]
[Site "GCS"]
[Date "2006.11.02"]
[White "sealion"]
[Black "John Evans"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1735"]
[BlackElo "1604"]
[TimeControl "900+5"]

1. d4 d5 2. Bg5 Nc6 3. Nf3 h6 4. Bh4 g5 5. Bg3 f5
6. e3 Nf6 7. Ne5 Nxe5 8. Bxe5 Bg7 9. Be2 g4 10. Nc3 Be6
11. Nb5 O-O 12. Nxc7 Rc8 13. Nxe6 Qa5+ 14. c3 Rfe8 15. Nxg7 Kxg7
16. Bxf6+ Kxf6 17. O-O h5 18. Qd3 e6 19. f3 Ke7 20. fxg4 hxg4
21. Qb5 Qc7 22. b3 Rh8 23. c4 Qxh2+ 24. Kf2 Qg3+ 25. Kg1 Qxe3+
26. Rf2 g3 27. Qxb7+ Kf6 28. Rf1 gxf2+ 29. Rxf2 Qxd4 30. cxd5 Rc1+
31. Bf1 Rxf1+ 32. Kxf1 Rh1+ 33. Ke2 Qe4+ 34. Kd2 Qe1+ 35. Kd3 Qxf2
36. dxe6 Rd1+ 37. Kc4 Rd4+ 38. Kb5 Qe2+ 39. Ka5 Qe5+ 40. Ka6 Qxe6+
0-1

--
Thanks,
John
http://growwithchess.com/


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Old November 3rd 06, 04:59 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
Ron Ron is offline
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 475
Default A game I should have lost

In article ,
"John Evans" wrote:

I've been working on attacking, but got to crazy in this game. My opponent
let me back into the game with a blunder on move 23, but the game was still
pretty neat. How was my tactics? Also is Learn Chess Tactics by John Nunn a
good tactics book?


[Event "GCS"]
[Site "GCS"]
[Date "2006.11.02"]
[Round "(null)"]
[White "sealion"]
[Black "John Evans"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ModificationDate "2006.11.02"]
[TimeControl "900+5"]
[BlackElo "1604"]
[WhiteElo "1735"]



1. d4 d5 2. Bg5 Nc6 {Already probably a mistake. At your level, I'd
probably just play Nf6 and dare him to double my pawns. Generally in d4
d5 openings you need to preserve the option of ...c5, so this knight
move is also suspect.} 3.Nf3 h6 {this doesn't bug me so much.} 4. Bh4 g5
{this more so, but it's forgivable if you follow up with Bg7.} 5. Bg3 f5
{this is just lazy. do you really think white is going to overlook the
threat to win his bishop, especially when this move serves no other
purpose?} 6. e3 Nf6 7. Ne5 Nxe5 8. Bxe5 Bg7 9.Be2 g4 {what are you
trying to accomplish with this move? you need to be developing!} 10. Nc3
Be6 11. Nb5 {this sort of threat you'll learn to see instantly with
experience.} O-O 12. Nxc7 Rc8 13. Nxe6 {notice how white wins a
piece here as a result of your poor fifth move. Had the pawn still be on
f7, you could just retake here.} Qa5+ 14. c3 Rfe8 15. Nxg7 Kxg7 16.
Bxf6+ Kxf6 17. O-O h5 18. Qd3 e6 19. f3 Ke7 20. fxg4 hxg4 21. Qb5 Qc7
22. b3 Rh8 23. c4 Qxh2+ 24.Kf2 Qg3+ 25. Kg1 Qxe3+ 26. Rf2 g3 27. Qxb7+
Kf6 28. Rf1 {You have a forced mate here. Look at this position until
you find it.} gxf2+ 29. Rxf2 Qxd4 30. cxd5 Rc1+ 31. Bf1 Rxf1+ 32. Kxf1
{look a little longer at this position, too.} Rh1+ 33. Ke2 Qe4+ 34. Kd2
Qe1+ 35. Kd3 Qxf2 36. dxe6 Rd1+ 37. Kc4 Rd4+ 38. Kb5 Qe2+
39. Ka5 Qe5+ 40. Ka6 Qxe6+ 0-1

I think that either "The Art of Checkmate" or "How to Beat Your Dad At
Chess" (or both, quite frankly - the later is simpler) would be a good
book for you. It'd certainly stop you from missing the mate on your 28th
move.
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Old November 3rd 06, 03:34 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 162
Default A game I should have lost

En/na John Evans ha escrit:
I've been working on attacking, but got to crazy in this game. My opponent
let me back into the game with a blunder on move 23, but the game was still
pretty neat. How was my tactics? Also is Learn Chess Tactics by John Nunn a
good tactics book?


[Event "GCS"]
[Site "GCS"]
[Date "2006.11.02"]
[White "sealion"]
[Black "John Evans"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1735"]
[BlackElo "1604"]
[TimeControl "900+5"]

1. d4 d5 2. Bg5 Nc6 3. Nf3 h6 4. Bh4 g5 5. Bg3 f5
6. e3 Nf6 7. Ne5 Nxe5 8. Bxe5 Bg7 9. Be2 g4 10. Nc3 Be6
11. Nb5 O-O 12. Nxc7 Rc8 13. Nxe6 Qa5+ 14. c3 Rfe8 15. Nxg7 Kxg7
16. Bxf6+ Kxf6 17. O-O h5 18. Qd3 e6 19. f3 Ke7 20. fxg4 hxg4
21. Qb5 Qc7 22. b3 Rh8 23. c4 Qxh2+ 24. Kf2 Qg3+ 25. Kg1 Qxe3+
26. Rf2 g3 27. Qxb7+ Kf6 28. Rf1 gxf2+ 29. Rxf2 Qxd4 30. cxd5 Rc1+
31. Bf1 Rxf1+ 32. Kxf1 Rh1+ 33. Ke2 Qe4+ 34. Kd2 Qe1+ 35. Kd3 Qxf2
36. dxe6 Rd1+ 37. Kc4 Rd4+ 38. Kb5 Qe2+ 39. Ka5 Qe5+ 40. Ka6 Qxe6+
0-1


WAS 25.Kxg3 POSSIBLE?

I think the best way to help you is to wait for your comments in first
pace, and then to post our comments to both the game and your thoughs.

AT

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Old November 3rd 06, 05:36 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2006
Posts: 323
Default A game I should have lost


Ron wrote:
In article ,
"John Evans" wrote:

I've been working on attacking, but got to crazy in this game. My opponent
let me back into the game with a blunder on move 23, but the game was still
pretty neat. How was my tactics? Also is Learn Chess Tactics by John Nunn a
good tactics book?


[Event "GCS"]
[Site "GCS"]
[Date "2006.11.02"]
[Round "(null)"]
[White "sealion"]
[Black "John Evans"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ModificationDate "2006.11.02"]
[TimeControl "900+5"]
[BlackElo "1604"]
[WhiteElo "1735"]



1. d4 d5 2. Bg5 Nc6 {Already probably a mistake. At your level, I'd
probably just play Nf6 and dare him to double my pawns. Generally in d4
d5 openings you need to preserve the option of ...c5, so this knight
move is also suspect.} 3.Nf3 h6 {this doesn't bug me so much.} 4. Bh4 g5
{this more so, but it's forgivable if you follow up with Bg7.} 5. Bg3 f5
{this is just lazy. do you really think white is going to overlook the
threat to win his bishop, especially when this move serves no other
purpose?} 6. e3 Nf6 7. Ne5 Nxe5 8. Bxe5 Bg7 9.Be2 g4 {what are you
trying to accomplish with this move? you need to be developing!} 10. Nc3
Be6 11. Nb5 {this sort of threat you'll learn to see instantly with
experience.} O-O 12. Nxc7 Rc8 13. Nxe6 {notice how white wins a
piece here as a result of your poor fifth move. Had the pawn still be on
f7, you could just retake here.} Qa5+ 14. c3 Rfe8 15. Nxg7 Kxg7 16.
Bxf6+ Kxf6 17. O-O h5 18. Qd3 e6 19. f3 Ke7 20. fxg4 hxg4 21. Qb5 Qc7
22. b3 Rh8 23. c4 Qxh2+ 24.Kf2 Qg3+ 25. Kg1 Qxe3+ 26. Rf2 g3 27. Qxb7+
Kf6 28. Rf1 {You have a forced mate here. Look at this position until
you find it.} gxf2+ 29. Rxf2 Qxd4 30. cxd5 Rc1+ 31. Bf1 Rxf1+ 32. Kxf1
{look a little longer at this position, too.} Rh1+ 33. Ke2 Qe4+ 34. Kd2
Qe1+ 35. Kd3 Qxf2 36. dxe6 Rd1+ 37. Kc4 Rd4+ 38. Kb5 Qe2+
39. Ka5 Qe5+ 40. Ka6 Qxe6+ 0-1

I think that either "The Art of Checkmate" or "How to Beat Your Dad At
Chess" (or both, quite frankly - the later is simpler) would be a good
book for you. It'd certainly stop you from missing the mate on your 28th
move.


Make the bishop look misplaced by 2...c6 followed by Qb6/Qa5+ ala
Kramnik, Anand, Kamsky, Dreev, Van Wely etc., etc. Only Van Wely lost
his game agains 2. Bg5; the other 4 players went 3.5 - .5, showing Bg5
a possible waste of time.

Do yourself a favor and go to Chessbase and download all the pgn's on
those first few moves for players rated 2400 or better and go over the
games and you'll learn alot and know how to handle it next time.

Tactics books are good only if you do tactical puzzles day in and day
out. It's not something you read and learn and just 'know' then forget
about. You have to practice tactics every day, like endgames.

Have you tried the Chess Tactics Server? Google it...

Got Game? Got Time? Get Chess Smart!: http://chess-training.blogspot.com

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Old November 9th 06, 12:49 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,598
Default A game I should have lost

Antonio Torrecillas wrote:
En/na John Evans ha escrit:
1. d4 d5 2. Bg5 Nc6 3. Nf3 h6 4. Bh4 g5 5. Bg3 f5 6. e3 Nf6 7. Ne5
Nxe5 8. Bxe5 Bg7 9. Be2 g4 10. Nc3 Be6 11. Nb5 O-O 12. Nxc7 Rc8
13. Nxe6 Qa5+ 14. c3 Rfe8 15. Nxg7 Kxg7 16. Bxf6+ Kxf6 17. O-O h5
18. Qd3 e6 19. f3 Ke7 20. fxg4 hxg4 21. Qb5 Qc7 22. b3 Rh8 23. c4
Qxh2+ 24. Kf2 Qg3+ 25. Kg1 Qxe3+ 26. Rf2 g3 27. Qxb7+ Kf6 28. Rf1
gxf2+ 29. Rxf2 Qxd4 30. cxd5 Rc1+ 31. Bf1 Rxf1+ 32. Kxf1 Rh1+
33. Ke2 Qe4+ 34. Kd2 Qe1+ 35. Kd3 Qxf2 36. dxe6 Rd1+ 37. Kc4 Rd4+
38. Kb5 Qe2+ 39. Ka5 Qe5+ 40. Ka6 Qxe6+ 0-1


WAS 25.Kxg3 POSSIBLE?


Note the subject line. ;-)


Dave.


--
David Richerby Enormous Clock (TM): it's like a clock
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ but it's huge!


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Old November 9th 06, 02:26 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2006
Posts: 323
Default A game I should have lost


wrote:
Ron wrote:
In article ,
"John Evans" wrote:

I've been working on attacking, but got to crazy in this game. My opponent
let me back into the game with a blunder on move 23, but the game was still
pretty neat. How was my tactics? Also is Learn Chess Tactics by John Nunn a
good tactics book?


[Event "GCS"]
[Site "GCS"]
[Date "2006.11.02"]
[Round "(null)"]
[White "sealion"]
[Black "John Evans"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ModificationDate "2006.11.02"]
[TimeControl "900+5"]
[BlackElo "1604"]
[WhiteElo "1735"]



1. d4 d5 2. Bg5 Nc6 {Already probably a mistake. At your level, I'd
probably just play Nf6 and dare him to double my pawns. Generally in d4
d5 openings you need to preserve the option of ...c5, so this knight
move is also suspect.} 3.Nf3 h6 {this doesn't bug me so much.} 4. Bh4 g5
{this more so, but it's forgivable if you follow up with Bg7.} 5. Bg3 f5
{this is just lazy. do you really think white is going to overlook the
threat to win his bishop, especially when this move serves no other
purpose?} 6. e3 Nf6 7. Ne5 Nxe5 8. Bxe5 Bg7 9.Be2 g4 {what are you
trying to accomplish with this move? you need to be developing!} 10. Nc3
Be6 11. Nb5 {this sort of threat you'll learn to see instantly with
experience.} O-O 12. Nxc7 Rc8 13. Nxe6 {notice how white wins a
piece here as a result of your poor fifth move. Had the pawn still be on
f7, you could just retake here.} Qa5+ 14. c3 Rfe8 15. Nxg7 Kxg7 16.
Bxf6+ Kxf6 17. O-O h5 18. Qd3 e6 19. f3 Ke7 20. fxg4 hxg4 21. Qb5 Qc7
22. b3 Rh8 23. c4 Qxh2+ 24.Kf2 Qg3+ 25. Kg1 Qxe3+ 26. Rf2 g3 27. Qxb7+
Kf6 28. Rf1 {You have a forced mate here. Look at this position until
you find it.} gxf2+ 29. Rxf2 Qxd4 30. cxd5 Rc1+ 31. Bf1 Rxf1+ 32. Kxf1
{look a little longer at this position, too.} Rh1+ 33. Ke2 Qe4+ 34. Kd2
Qe1+ 35. Kd3 Qxf2 36. dxe6 Rd1+ 37. Kc4 Rd4+ 38. Kb5 Qe2+
39. Ka5 Qe5+ 40. Ka6 Qxe6+ 0-1

I think that either "The Art of Checkmate" or "How to Beat Your Dad At
Chess" (or both, quite frankly - the later is simpler) would be a good
book for you. It'd certainly stop you from missing the mate on your 28th
move.


Make the bishop look misplaced by 2...c6 followed by Qb6/Qa5+ ala
Kramnik, Anand, Kamsky, Dreev, Van Wely etc., etc. Only Van Wely lost
his game agains 2. Bg5; the other 4 players went 3.5 - .5, showing Bg5
a possible waste of time.

Do yourself a favor and go to Chessbase and download all the pgn's on
those first few moves for players rated 2400 or better and go over the
games and you'll learn alot and know how to handle it next time.

Tactics books are good only if you do tactical puzzles day in and day
out. It's not something you read and learn and just 'know' then forget
about. You have to practice tactics every day, like endgames.

Have you tried the Chess Tactics Server? Google it...

Got Game? Got Time? Get Chess Smart!:
http://chess-training.blogspot.com

And, to answer your question, "Learn Chess Tactics" is supposedly a
good book on Tactical motifs. It has a chapter on each motif and
explains how each motif comes about and works.

But solving tactical problems every day will help you. You need two
kinds of problem-solving - patterns and combinations.

Pattern-solving is the type of training you get when you solve really
simple mate in 2 or 3 or win of a piece in 2 or three moves. These
problems reinforce the basic mating and pin/fork patterns that you
probably miss seeing automatically in a position.

Warm up with those types of problems, then move on to the combinative
type you'd see in Informant, ChessBase, etc., that are more difficult.
But, EVERY DAY.

I recommend two things: Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games :
http://www.amazon.com/Chess-5334-Pro...e=UTF8&s=books

and a blog: http://chess-training.blogspot.com

Good Luck!

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