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Old February 23rd 07, 03:27 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default In search of new creative way to study chess


Im tired of Analysis opening lines to end up with draws.

So how does one go about creating a playing a non-dubious novelty?

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Old February 23rd 07, 04:16 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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On 23 Feb, 15:27, "materialkiller" wrote:
Im tired of Analysis opening lines to end up with draws.

So how does one go about creating a playing a non-dubious novelty?


I don't think you'll find a non-dubious novelty. If it weren't
dubious, it'd be mainstream.
Anyway, that said, I'll share with you my adventures using the St
George.

I've been away from chess for about 10 years and was persuaded to play
again by a friend. I said I'd give it a season and see how it went.
The initial plan was for me to play in the third team until I found my
feet, perhaps bottom board in the first team a little later.
Anyway, after a few friendlies, I found myself lined up to play top
board for the first team.
So I sat down and evaluated the situation, much like you did. When I
played before, I was a student with plenty of time for analysis. Now
I work full time and have all the demands the demands of marriage,
bills, work and hamsters.
I didn't have time to bone up on a white opening, and replies to
various white openings. My first criteria was something that I could
play against anything. I don't like nf6 , g6, bg7 systems for black
and I've had good success against that structure with white.
The st george[*] spoke to me so I got a copy of Basman's book. Its
wacky, but it has some good solid ideas. I know this group will
disagree with me as I posted one of my games for analysis and got
shouted at!
Its really working for me for the following reasons -
1) We play 75 +15 mins games. My opponents will often spend lots of
time figuring out their opening, while I can bash out the moves
quickly.
2) I'm always fighting on ground of my own choosing
3) My opponent's do not have book knowledge of the opening,
neutralising their experience and opening knowledge.
4) I can play the related 1b4 with white, with similar results.
5) Even if my opponent does prepare ahead of time, its a situation
they will have studied, but I will have played many times. I still
think I have the advantage.
6) Stronger players don't do this, but weaker ones feel they should
be winning and over push the situation. I know the position is stable
and don't have to worry.
Of course, this depends on what level you play at. Don't rely on
this, just be prepared to take advantage if it happens.
7) Its fun! Maybe its the rebel in me, but I enjoy flying in the
face of conventional theory.

Be aware, though, that playing anything off the wall is not a
substitute for learning theory. Because you surrender the centre, you
must play the opening carefully and exactly. You have to know spot on
what you are up to. Your opponent can faff a bit (but only a bit!)
and still get a reasonable position, but you have no margin for error.

In terms of results, I'm cruising around 60%. I am rusty, and I'm
still learning the ins and outs of the opening, so I'm pleased with
those results.

Even with all that said, though, I have had a few draws. However,
some of them I felt lucky to get, and others I felt I may have had
more. Its certainly not a safe option!
I do believe that if if I'd stuck with the 1.nf3, 2 c4 I used to play
as white, and my old e4,e5 or d4,d5 with black my results would be
much poorer.

If the booky main lines are not inspiring you, I'd encurage you to
have a look at it. Play a few blitz games and see if it flies. It
might work for you.
And feel free to post back here if you want any more information.

Phil.

[* the St George is best known for the pawn formation a6, b5. e6,
Bb7, c5 are also played. Castling is usually delayed]


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Old February 23rd 07, 05:01 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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materialkiller wrote:
Im tired of Analysis opening lines to end up with draws.

So how does one go about creating a playing a non-dubious novelty?


Without knowing your level, the question is impossible to answer.

Why do you care about novelties. Chess is a competition against your
opponent and what matters is that you understand the position better
than your opponent. Obsessing with novelties turns chess into a
competition against everyone who's ever played the game well before.
That's a competition you can only lose.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Lead Tool (TM): it's like a handy
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ household tool that weighs a ton!
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Old February 23rd 07, 05:07 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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On Feb 23, 10:27 am, "materialkiller" wrote:
Im tired of Analysis opening lines to end up with draws.


One would not have that problem if one were dealing with ideas instead
of brute-force analysis of opening variations.

Unless you are tops in chess, you'd be better served honing your
ability to tackle ideas, imbalances (the creation of and exploitation
of), middlegame plan construction and solid endgame play and leave the
opening novelties to Topalov.

How often do you get into games where both of you follow a path where
a useful novelty exists? My guess is very, very rarely. So, it's a
waste of time.


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Old February 24th 07, 02:35 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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Thanks, Phil.

Your Idea of the St. George is interesting one. I remeber facing a
talent teenager in Chicago who use this defense against me and the
middlegame became very complicated, He manage to beat me I wish I
still had the game score. Its definitely an opening where strength of
the player determines the outcome than analysis.

So, how do you go about studing rare lines? Since they are rarely
played at the top level what example games do you follow?

I hate using a computer for analysis - because it seems I'm trying to
figure out how the computer thinks than coming up with my own ideas.
Is there a better way to make use of computer analysis?




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Old February 24th 07, 02:43 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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On Feb 23, 5:01 pm, David Richerby
wrote:
materialkiller wrote:
Im tired of Analysis opening lines to end up with draws.


So how does one go about creating a playing a non-dubious novelty?


Without knowing your level, the question is impossible to answer.


My rating is 1800, The strongest opponent I beat was 2300.


Why do you care about novelties. Chess is a competition against your
opponent and what matters is that you understand the position better
than your opponent. Obsessing with novelties turns chess into a
competition against everyone who's ever played the game well before.
That's a competition you can only lose.


I meant to use the term noveltie losely, I want to start playing my
own ideas than copying the moves of other players.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Lead Tool (TM): it's like a handywww.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ household tool that weighs a ton!



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Old February 27th 07, 02:36 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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wrote:
"materialkiller" wrote:
So how does one go about creating a playing a non-dubious novelty?


I don't think you'll find a non-dubious novelty. If it weren't
dubious, it'd be mainstream.


Not so. Currently, there's no reason to assume that we're playing
chess perfectly. Therefore, there must be improvements to be made.
Since they've not happened yet, they'll be novelties when they do
happen.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Incredible Clock (TM): it's like a
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ clock but it'll blow your mind!
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Old February 27th 07, 08:08 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default In search of new creative way to study chess

On Feb 24, 9:43 am, "materialkiller" wrote:

I meant to use the term noveltie losely, I want to start playing my
own ideas than copying the moves of other players.


Then simply stop studying the opening, use your brain, construct your
own ideas, come up with a plan, select your candidate moves, evaluate
the moves, and select one.

That in itself makes it 'your own idea'.

I sense you are frustrated because you perhaps cannot get above the
current level you are at.

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Old February 27th 07, 08:39 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
Ron Ron is offline
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In article m,
" wrote:

I meant to use the term noveltie losely, I want to start playing my
own ideas than copying the moves of other players.


Then simply stop studying the opening, use your brain, construct your
own ideas, come up with a plan, select your candidate moves, evaluate
the moves, and select one.


My results improved dramatically when I stopped worrying about theory.
Yeah, sure, sometimes I sidestepped it (the Smith-Morra instead of the
Open sicillian), but otherwise I just started playing early 20th-century
chess. Lots of gambits, lots of fun attacking play - and I won more
games.

Theory is boring. But you can also make it almost completely irrelevant
to your game.

Study Lasker, Tarrasch, and Alekhine rather than Kasparov and Anand.

-Ron
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Old March 1st 07, 11:53 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default In search of new creative way to study chess

On 27 Feb, 14:36, David Richerby
wrote:
wrote:
"materialkiller" wrote:
So how does one go about creating a playing a non-dubious novelty?


I don't think you'll find a non-dubious novelty. If it weren't
dubious, it'd be mainstream.


Not so. Currently, there's no reason to assume that we're playing
chess perfectly. Therefore, there must be improvements to be made.
Since they've not happened yet, they'll be novelties when they do
happen.

Dave.

--
David Richerby Incredible Clock (TM): it's like awww.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ clock but it'll blow your mind!


Hmm, yeah, ok, good point.
What I had in mind, but didn't type very well, is that if you do find
a new move, even if its sound, you are likely to get derision from
your chess playing fellows if you play something thats not 'book'.
I think I had the st george particularly in mind whilst posting my
original message.
I get grief for playing that all the time. Despite its unconventional
approach, its never been refuted as far as I know, but many players
don't take it seriously. At least at first :-)

Thanks for the correction.

Phil

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