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Old December 30th 09, 08:18 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.collecting.coins,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964)

On Dec 25, 12:27*am, samsloan wrote:

Reinfeld drew his individual game with Alekhine and defeated
Reshevsky. Final scores we Alekhine 8.5-2.5, Kashdan 7.5-3.5, Dake,
Steiner and Reshevsky 6-5, Borochow 5.5-5.5, Reinfeld, Bernstein, Fine
and Factor 5-6, Araiza 3.5-7.5, and Fink 3-8.

All of these players were grandmasters on the modern standard, except
for perhaps the bottom two.


That seems quite an exaggeration. Herman Steiner had opportunity
during his life to gain the GM title but only made IM. The Bernstein
at Pasadena 1932 was not GM Ossip Bernstein, but Jacob Bernstein of
New York, a player of little international accomplishment as far as I
can determine. Harry Borochow, Samuel Factor and Reinfeld never were
GM strength. One should not make too much of the fact that they did as
well or better than Fine at Pasadena, since in 1932 Fine was nowhere
near his peak strength of a few years later.

When the first USCF rating list came out as of July 31, 1950, Fred
Reinfeld was rated 2593, making him the sixth highest rated player in
America.


That 1950 rating should not be confused with a modern Elo rating. It
was based on a different system, where ratings overall came out a bit
higher. For example Fine, the #1 player on that 1950 list, was rated
2817, about 160 points higher than his estimated 5-year peak Elo.

In addition to writing chess books, Reinfeld also wrote books about
coin collecting, stamp collecting and a variety of other subjects. He
wrote a book about presidential politics, a book about whales and he
even wrote a revised edition of the Charles Dickens classic Oliver
Twist.


Here is list of Reinfeld's books on subjects other than chess:

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/reinfeld.html

It would be more accurate to say his version of "Oliver Twist" was
abridged, rather than revised.
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Old January 2nd 10, 07:24 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.collecting.coins,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964)

On Dec 30 2009, 3:18*pm, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Dec 25, 12:27*am, samsloan wrote:



Reinfeld drew his individual game with Alekhine and defeated
Reshevsky. Final scores we Alekhine 8.5-2.5, Kashdan 7.5-3.5, Dake,
Steiner and Reshevsky 6-5, Borochow 5.5-5.5, Reinfeld, Bernstein, Fine
and Factor 5-6, Araiza 3.5-7.5, and Fink 3-8.


All of these players were grandmasters on the modern standard, except
for perhaps the bottom two.


* That seems quite an exaggeration. Herman Steiner had opportunity
during his life to gain the GM title but only made IM. The Bernstein
at Pasadena 1932 was not GM Ossip Bernstein, but Jacob Bernstein of
New York, a player of little international accomplishment as far as I
can determine. Harry Borochow, Samuel Factor and Reinfeld never were
GM strength. One should not make too much of the fact that they did as
well or better than Fine at Pasadena, since in 1932 Fine was nowhere
near his peak strength of a few years later.

When the first USCF rating list came out as of July 31, 1950, Fred
Reinfeld was rated 2593, making him the sixth highest rated player in
America.


* That 1950 rating should not be confused with a modern Elo rating. It
was based on a different system, where ratings overall came out a bit
higher. For example Fine, the #1 player on that 1950 list, was rated
2817, about 160 points higher than his estimated 5-year peak Elo.


I recall reading Larry Evans, in some Chess Life and Review (or just
Chess Life), column said that Reinfeld had a plus lifetime score
against Sammy Reshevsky. If this is true, it's remarkable.

Reinfeld was undoubtably a very strong Master. In all fairness, 1950
was probably well after his best days were behind him as he soon
retired from competitive chess. Reinfeld was a 22 year old student in
1932, so you might expect that this good result at Pasadena 1932 was
before his best days.

I can't find a crosstable for Pasadena 1932, but chessgames.com has
several of the games, which shows he drew Alekhine and Kashdan, both
GMs near the top of their games and defeated Reshevsky and Fine.

I agree that the many of the players listed by Sloan as being GM
strength probably were not.


In addition to writing chess books, Reinfeld also wrote books about
coin collecting, stamp collecting and a variety of other subjects. He
wrote a book about presidential politics, a book about whales and he
even wrote a revised edition of the Charles Dickens classic Oliver
Twist.


* Here is list of Reinfeld's books on subjects other than chess:

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/reinfeld.html

* It would be more accurate to say his version of "Oliver Twist" was
abridged, rather than revised.


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Old January 2nd 10, 08:25 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.collecting.coins,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964)

On Jan 2, 2:24*pm, Jordan Henderson
wrote:

I recall reading Larry Evans, in some Chess Life and Review (or just
Chess Life), column said that Reinfeld had a plus lifetime score
against Sammy Reshevsky. *If this is true, it's remarkable.


I believe it is true. Reinfeld beat Reshevsky twice in 1932, at
Minneapolis and at Pasadena, and drew against him in the two other
serious games I can find, in the US Championships of 1938 and 1940.
The two wins are given in his Wikipedia entry:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Re...hess_victories

Reinfeld was undoubtably a very strong Master. *In all fairness, 1950
was probably well after his best days were behind him as he soon
retired from competitive chess. *Reinfeld was a 22 year old student in
1932, so you might expect that this good result at Pasadena 1932 was
before his best days.


I believe the 1950 USCF rating is based mostly on his peak years.
Reinfeld had pretty much quit serious chess by 1950, maybe as far back
as the early 1940s, and so the USCF would have had to dig back some
years to include him. (The last game my Chessbase CD has for him is
from 1941.) I agree that at his best he was a strong master, probably
2400+ in today's terms. In some ways his books are dated and overly
dogmatic, but one could say the same about some all-time greats.

I can't find a crosstable for Pasadena 1932,


Try "Reuben Fine: A Comprehensive Record of an American Chess Career
1929-1951" by Aidan Woodger (McFarland & Co., 2004), page 27. It says
Reinfeld scored +3 -4 =4, beating Reshevsky, Factor and Fink, losing
to Dake, Borochow, Fine and Araiza, and drawing with Alekhine,
Kashdan, H. Steiner, J. Bernstein, and Fink. Unfortunately many games
from this event seem to have been lost.

but chessgames.com has
several of the games, which shows he drew Alekhine and Kashdan, both
GMs near the top of their games and defeated Reshevsky and Fine.

I agree that the many of the players listed by Sloan as being GM
strength probably were not.


Our Sam is prone to hyperbolic claims that lack factual basis.
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Old January 2nd 10, 08:37 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.collecting.coins,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964)

On Jan 2, 3:25*pm, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Jan 2, 2:24*pm, Jordan Henderson
wrote:



I recall reading Larry Evans, in some Chess Life and Review (or just
Chess Life), column said that Reinfeld had a plus lifetime score
against Sammy Reshevsky. *If this is true, it's remarkable.


* I believe it is true. Reinfeld beat Reshevsky twice in 1932, at
Minneapolis and at Pasadena, and drew against him in the two other
serious games I can find, in the US Championships of 1938 and 1940.
The two wins are given in his Wikipedia entry:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Re...hess_victories

Reinfeld was undoubtably a very strong Master. *In all fairness, 1950
was probably well after his best days were behind him as he soon
retired from competitive chess. *Reinfeld was a 22 year old student in
1932, so you might expect that this good result at Pasadena 1932 was
before his best days.


* I believe the 1950 USCF rating is based mostly on his peak years.
Reinfeld had pretty much quit serious chess by 1950, maybe as far back
as the early 1940s, and so the USCF would have had to dig back some
years to include him. (The last game my Chessbase CD has for him is
from 1941.) I agree that at his best he was a strong master, probably
2400+ in today's terms. In some ways his books are dated and overly
dogmatic, but one could say the same about some all-time greats.

I can't find a crosstable for Pasadena 1932,


* Try "Reuben Fine: A Comprehensive Record of an American Chess Career
1929-1951" by Aidan Woodger (McFarland & Co., 2004), page 27. It says
Reinfeld scored +3 -4 =4, beating Reshevsky, Factor and Fink, losing
to Dake, Borochow, Fine and Araiza, and drawing with Alekhine,
Kashdan, H. Steiner, J. Bernstein, and Fink. Unfortunately many games
from this event seem to have been lost.

but chessgames.com has
several of the games, which shows he drew Alekhine and Kashdan, both
GMs near the top of their games and defeated Reshevsky and Fine.


I agree that the many of the players listed by Sloan as being GM
strength probably were not.


* Our Sam is prone to hyperbolic claims that lack factual basis.


Correction: At Pasadena 1932, Reinfeld did not draw with Fink. I
inadvertently mentioned Fink twice.
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Old January 2nd 10, 11:15 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.collecting.coins,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964)

Taylor Kingston wrote:
..
Correction: At Pasadena 1932, Reinfeld did not draw with Fink. I
inadvertently mentioned Fink twice.


I really fink you are loosing it Taylor


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Old January 3rd 10, 01:42 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.collecting.coins,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964)

On Jan 2, 6:15*pm, micky wrote:
Taylor Kingston wrote:

.

* Correction: At Pasadena 1932, Reinfeld did not draw with Fink. I
inadvertently mentioned Fink twice.


I really fink you are loosing it Taylor


Not unlikely. As National Lampoon's "Deteriorata" said, "Gracefully
surrender the things of age, tuna, and Taiwan." Or was it "Gracefully
surrender the things of age: Tuna, and Taiwan." Whether this refers to
Bill Parcells is a matter of debate for scholars.
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Old January 3rd 10, 06:30 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.collecting.coins,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964)

Reinfeld was a great chess writer, under-rated in today's glut of
opening monographs and over-priced Kasparov doorstops. I myself got my
start with Winning at Chess and Chess in a Nutshell.

The only writer who has come close to his style and ability to
popularize the game is Silman, but even he writes to the tournament
player. We need a new Reinfeld!

TMB
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