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Old May 28th 10, 08:16 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Fearsome Ray Lopez attack--how do you refute this? Impossible saysFritz!

[Event "Friendly Game, 5m + 0s"]
[Site "Café"]
[Date "2010.05.28"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Guest32452"]
[Black "SkatoPsyxos"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C68"]
[BlackElo "1821"]
[PlyCount "44"]
[EventDate "2010.05.28"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. h3 f6 6. d3 Bd6 7. Be3
Ne7 8. Qd2
Ng6 9. a3 O-O 10. O-O Be6 11. Nc3 Bf7 12. Ne2 b5 13. Ng3 Be6 14. b3
Qc8 15. a4
Ne7 16. axb5 cxb5 17. Qc3 f5 18. exf5 Nxf5 19. Nxf5 Bxf5 20. Bc5 Bxh3
21. Bxd6
Bxg2 22. Nxe5 Qh3 0-1

Wow! I bet Taylor Kingston wishes he could play like this! And in
blitz no less!
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Old May 30th 10, 05:26 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Fearsome Ray Lopez attack--how do you refute this? Impossiblesays Fritz!

On May 28, 3:16*pm, raylopez99 wrote:

[Event "Friendly Game, 5m + 0s"]
[Site "Café"]
[Date "2010.05.28"]
[Round "?"]
[White "ChessFart"]
[Black "SkatoPsyxos"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C68"]
[BlackElo "1821"]
[PlyCount "44"]
[EventDate "2010.05.28"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. h3 f6 6. d3 Bd6 7. Be3
Ne7 8. Qd2
Ng6 9. a3 O-O 10. O-O Be6 11. Nc3 Bf7 12. Ne2 b5 13. Ng3 Be6 14. b3
Qc8 15. a4
Ne7 16. axb5 cxb5 17. Qc3 f5 18. exf5 Nxf5 19. Nxf5 Bxf5 20. Bc5 Bxh3
21. Bxd6
Bxg2 22. Nxe5 Qh3 0-1

Wow! *I bet Taylor Kingston wishes he could play like this! *And in
blitz no less!



Ray, this was much worse than TK's game (seriously). You my friend
are not quite ready for prime time. Let your chess skill simmer for a
few
more years, add salt and other flavorings to mask the blandness of
your
play, and then try once again to impress rgc readers.

In view of the severity of your case, I feel compelled to recommend
you
switch to wide open games and gambit play, as this dull stuff does
not
appear to be your cup of tea (for example, your ...Be6-f7-e6
floundering).

Nevertheless congratulations are in order, for it is not every day
you
can defeat someone twice your skill level! Well done.



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Old May 31st 10, 02:34 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Posts: 3,170
Default Fearsome Ray Lopez attack--how do you refute this? Impossiblesays Fritz!

[Event "Friendly Game, 5m + 0s"]
[Site "Café"]
[Date "2010.05.28"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Guest32452"]
[Black "SkatoPsyxos"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C68"]
[BlackElo "1821"]
[PlyCount "44"]
[EventDate "2010.05.28"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 {
Yawn. Even Fischer blushed when he played this} dxc6 5. h3 {
Not good but probably not a disaster} f6 6. d3 {Not very good. The
possessor
of the NN v BB should try to open the position: 6.d3} Bd6 $1 {
This looks like a move based on experience.} (6... Bc5 {
looks like a more active choice, but it has a major drawback:} 7. --
Be6 {
is the natural followup; but the raison d'etre of that move is to play
Pc6-c5-c4(-c3) to get rid of the doubled pawns. But you can't play
that if the
B is 'actively' placed onc5} 8. -- Qd7 {would be another development}
9. --
O-O-O {and the king is safe, and black can attack on the K-side}) 7.
Be3 Ne7 8.
Qd2 Ng6 9. a3 {Uh-oh. This looks like one country move too many} O-O
10. O-O
Be6 {The Pf6 is really important!} 11. Nc3 Bf7 {
Possibly waiting to see what white will do} 12. Ne2 b5 {
Black's position is much more dynamic than white's; he can play on
both wings}
({With the hackneyed idea of} 12... -- 13. Ng3 -- 14. Nf5) 13. Ng3 Be6
{
Despite these liberties with his B black is okay because white has
wasted tie
as well} 14. b3 (14. b4 $1 $16) 14... Qc8 {
With a target - h3, but perventing Nf5 as well} 15. a4 {
I cannot see the point of this as axb5 cxb5 surely helps black} Ne7 $6
{
The N looked fine where it was} 16. axb5 cxb5 17. Qc3 (17. b4 {
would now be good, trying to pressure the a6 pawn}) 17... f5 $1 {
Very good! A real shake-up of the position} 18. exf5 Nxf5 19. Nxf5
Bxf5 20. Bc5
{It is very hard to find the right moves in such positions} (20. Nxe5
{
probably would not have saved white; black is too active}) 20... Bxh3
$1 21.
Bxd6 ({Once again} 21. Nxe5 $5 {might have been better}) 21... Bxg2
22. Nxe5 (
22. Bxf8 $1 Bxf3 23. Qxe5 $8 Qg4+ 24. Qg3 Rxf8 {
actually seems quite god for white}) 22... Qh3 {Goodnight, Vienna!} 0-1
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Old June 1st 10, 08:31 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Fearsome Ray Lopez attack--how do you refute this? Impossiblesays Fritz!

On May 31, 9:34*am, Offramp wrote:

[Event "Friendly Game, 5m + 0s"]
[Site "Café"]
[Date "2010.05.28"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Guest32452"]
[Black "SkatoPsyxos"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C68"]
[BlackElo "1821"]
[PlyCount "44"]
[EventDate "2010.05.28"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 {
Yawn. Even Fischer blushed when he played this} dxc6 5. h3 {
Not good but probably not a disaster} f6 6. d3 {Not very good. The
possessor of the NN v BB should try to open the position: 6.d3}



What sort of jibberish are you trying to foist upon us? Your
comments appear to have been generated by some kind of
(clearly virus infected) computer patzer, like Fritz after a frontal
lobotomy.

The side with the two bishops of course should try to open the
position, while the side with two knights should avoid religious
disputes and start a war-- preferably one in which archers play
no part. In the above game white ought to play dull moves like
p-d3 (which he did). It is black who ought to have tried to open
the position for his two bishops.

But things are no so simple as these plattitudes may suggest.
Knights should be deprived (not depraved, as in 'Monty Python
and the Holy Grail') of forward posts where they are effectively
supported by pawns. This requires a good deal of skill (which
is quite rare these days). In general, the bishops are superior--
but not so superior as to make things easy or allow for careless
play to automatically prevail, as we see in this example where
I ultimately managed to secure a draw with two knights against
two bioshops, after a VERY tough fight:


1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Bg4 3. c4 Nc6 4. cxd5 Bxf3 5. gxf3 Qxd5 6. e3 e5 7.
Nc3 Bb4
8. Bd2 Qd7 9. d5 Nce7 10. Qb3 Bxc3 11. Bxc3 Qxd5 12. Qxd5 Nxd5 13.
Bxe5 f6
14. Bd4 Nge7 15. Rg1 O-O 16. Bc4 Kh8 17. Bc5 Rfe8 18. O-O-O Nb6 19.
Bf7 Rf8
20. Bh5 g6 21. Bxe7 Rf7 22. Bxg6 hxg6 23. Bb4 Kg7 24. Rd4 c5 25. Bxc5
Rc8
26. b4 Nd7 27. Kb1 Nxc5 28. bxc5 Rxc5 29. Rdg4 Rb5+ 30. Ka1 g5 31. h4
Rc7
32. hxg5 Rc2 33. gxf6+ Kf7 34. Rb1 Ra5 35. Rxb7+ Kxf6 36. Rf4+ Ke6 37.
a4
Rxf2 38. Rb2 Rf1+ 39. Ka2 Re5 40. Re2 Kd5 41. Kb2 Kc5 42. Kc3 Rc1+ 43.
Kd2
Ra1 44. Rg4 Rf5 45. Rf2 Re5 46. e4 Kd4 47. Rg7 Ra2+ 48. Ke1 Rxa4 49.
Re2
Rh5 50. Rd7+ Kc4 51. Rc2+ Kb3 52. Rcd2 Ra1+ 53. Ke2 a5 54. Rb7+ Kc3
55.
Rc7+ Kb3 56. Kd3 Rf1 57. Rb7+ Ka3 58. Ke3 a4 59. Kf4 Rh4+ 60. Kg5 Rxf3
61.
Kxh4 Rf4+ 62. Kg3 Rf3+ 63. Kg4 Rf4+ 64. Kg5 Rf5+ 65. Kg6 Rf6+ 66. Kg7
Rg6+
67. Kh8 Rg8+ 68. Kh7 Rh8+ 69. Kg6 Rh6+ 70. Kf5 Rf6+ 71. Kg5 Rf5+ 72.
Kg6
Rf6+ 73. Kg7 Rg6+ 74. Kh8 Rg8+ 75. Kh7 Rh8+ 76. Kg6 Rh6+ 77. Kg5 Rg6+
78.
Kf4 Rg4+ 79. Kf3 Rf4+ 80. Ke2 Rxe4+ 81. Kd1 Re1+ 82. Kc2 Rc1+ 83. Kd3
Rc3+
84. Kd4 Rc4+ 85. Kd5 Rc5+ 86. Kd6 Rc6+ 87. Kd7 Rb6 88. Rc7 Rb2 89. Rd4
Rb8
90. Rcc4 Ra8 91. Rb4 Ra6 92. Ke7 Ra7+ 93. Ke6 Ra6+ 94. Ke5 Ra5+ 95.
Ke4 Ra6
96. Kd3 Ra8 97. Kc2 Rc8+ 98. Kb1 Rb8 1/2-1/2
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Old June 1st 10, 11:24 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Fearsome Ray Lopez attack--how do you refute this? Impossiblesays Fritz!

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 {
Yawn. Even Fischer blushed when he played this} dxc6 5. h3 {
Not good but probably not a disaster} f6 6. d3 {Not very good. The
possessor of the NN v BB should try to open the position: 6.d3}


* What sort of jibberish are you trying to foist upon us?


LOROL!


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Old June 2nd 10, 12:11 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Fearsome Ray Lopez attack--how do you refute this? Impossiblesays Fritz!

Offramp wrote:

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 {
Yawn. Even Fischer blushed when he played this} dxc6 5. h3 {
Not good but probably not a disaster} f6 6. d3 {Not very good. The
possessor of the NN v BB should try to open the position: 6.d3}


What sort of jibberish are you trying to foist upon us?


LOROL!


London Overground Rail Operations Ltd (LOROL), initially known as MTR
Laing, is a train operating company contracted to operate the London
Overground train ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Overground_Rail_Operations ...............

Huh ! und anyways I got to precisely here : 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5
a6 4. Bxc6 {
Yawn. Even Fischer blushed when he played this} dxc6 5. h3 {
Not good but probably not a disaster} f6 6. d3 {Not very good. The
possessor
of the NN v BB should try to open the position: 6.d3} Bd6 $1 {
This looks like a move based on experience.} (6... Bc5 {
looks like a more active choice, but it has a major drawback:} 7. --
whereupon my gameplayer spat the dummy und refused fiddly cajolement (we
decided on an abortion) which is no great loss - given it's yet another
treenie wank - but still, und all, there was some sense of
disappointment @ being "had" by yet another meanie post..

m.
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Old June 2nd 10, 10:19 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Fearsome Ray Lopez attack--how do you refute this? Impossiblesays Fritz!

On 1 June, 08:31, The Master wrote:
On May 31, 9:34*am, Offramp wrote:


* The side with the two bishops of course should try to open the
position...


I wasn't being entirely serious, but:

"The player with the two knights should try to open the position."

- Andrew Soltis, The Wisest Things Ever Said About Chess, (
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Wisest-Thing.../dp/1906388008
), page 196.

He is quoting John Watson from his Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy.

Soltis gives this game:
[Event "World Cup ACP 1st"]
[Site "Odessa"]
[Date "2007.01.05"]
[Round "1.2"]
[White "Leko, Peter"]
[Black "Sokolov, Ivan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C64"]
[WhiteElo "2749"]
[BlackElo "2652"]
[PlyCount "41"]
[EventDate "2007.01.05"]
[EventType "k.o. (rapid)"]
[EventRounds "4"]
[EventCountry "UKR"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2007.02.01"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Bc5 4. c3 f5 5. d4 fxe4 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7.
Nxe5 Qd5 8.
O-O Nf6 9. Bf4 Bd6 10. c4 Qe6 11. c5 Be7 12. Nc3 Qf5 13. Bg3 Be6 14.
f3!

{Trying to open the position.}

exf3?

{Black should keep matters closed with ...e3}

15. Rxf3 Qh5 16. Qe2 Bf5 17. Raf1 g6 18. Qc4 Rf8 19. d5 Nd7 20. Nxd7
Bxd7 21.
d6 1-0
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Old June 6th 10, 09:24 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Fearsome Ray Lopez attack--how do you refute this? Impossiblesays Fritz!

On Jun 1, 10:31*am, The Master wrote:
*In general, the bishops are superior--
but not so superior as to make things easy or allow for careless
play to automatically prevail, as we see in this example where
I ultimately managed to secure a draw with two knights against
two bioshops, after a VERY tough fight:


98. Kb1 Rb8 1/2-1/2


You need to get a PC, The Minor. 98. Rdc4 wins for white (mate in 6).
Good example of a "furious rook" though.

RL

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