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Old June 11th 10, 11:12 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Mar 2009
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Default Find the best move..fails to find the best defense

Another position from the far too easy book "Can you be a tactical
genius?" by James Plaskett, problem Test 2, Puzzle 8.

The bishop was on Bc1, and the best move is indeed Bg5, which I found
and many players would find, but the only moves Plaskett considers, g6
and h6, are not the best move, which is Nxe5. Another example of why
playing (and beating) your computer is hard. BTW in response to g6
you should play Ba6! which is striking. But again, against a PC, you
would never get a chance to play this move.

RL

[Event "London 1991"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1991.01.01"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Plaskett"]
[Black "Arkell"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r2q1rk1/pb2bppp/1pn1pn2/4N3/3P3Q/2NB4/PP3PPP/R1B2RK1 w - - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "2"]

1. Bg5 Nxe5 (1... h6 2. Bxf6 Bxf6 3. Qe4 g6 4. Nxg6 fxg6 5. Qxg6+ Bg7
6. Qh7+
Kf7 7. Bg6+ Ke7 (7... Kf6 8. Ne4+ Ke7 9. Qxg7+ Rf7 10. Qxf7#) 8.
Qxg7+) (1...
g6 2. Ba6) *

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Old June 11th 10, 02:46 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Find the best move..fails to find the best defense

On Jun 11, 6:12*am, raylopez99 wrote:
Another position from the far too easy book "Can you be a tactical
genius?" by James Plaskett, problem Test 2, Puzzle 8.

The bishop was on Bc1, and the best move is indeed Bg5, which I found
and many players would find, but the only moves Plaskett considers, g6
and h6, are not the best move, which is Nxe5. *Another example of why
playing (and beating) your computer is hard. *BTW in response to g6
you should play Ba6! which is striking. *But again, against a PC, you
would never get a chance to play this move.

RL

[Event "London 1991"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1991.01.01"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Plaskett"]
[Black "Arkell"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r2q1rk1/pb2bppp/1pn1pn2/4N3/3P3Q/2NB4/PP3PPP/R1B2RK1 w - - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "2"]

1. Bg5 Nxe5 (1... h6 2. Bxf6 Bxf6 3. Qe4 g6 4. Nxg6 fxg6 5. Qxg6+ Bg7
6. Qh7+
Kf7 7. Bg6+ Ke7 (7... Kf6 8. Ne4+ Ke7 9. Qxg7+ Rf7 10. Qxf7#) 8.
Qxg7+) (1...
g6 2. Ba6) *


One presumes Plaskett thought that after 1. Bg5 Nxe5 2. Bxf6 Nxd3 3.
Bxe7 Qc7 4. Bxf8 Rxf8, White is winning, since he's up rook for
bishop. Perhaps he did not analyze far enough to see that Black will
probably win either the b- or d-pawn and have other compensation,
making the theoretical win problematical.

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Old June 11th 10, 10:01 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,536
Default Find the best move..fails to find the best defense

On Jun 11, 4:46*pm, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Jun 11, 6:12*am, raylopez99 wrote:



Another position from the far too easy book "Can you be a tactical
genius?" by James Plaskett, problem Test 2, Puzzle 8.


The bishop was on Bc1, and the best move is indeed Bg5, which I found
and many players would find, but the only moves Plaskett considers, g6
and h6, are not the best move, which is Nxe5. *Another example of why
playing (and beating) your computer is hard. *BTW in response to g6
you should play Ba6! which is striking. *But again, against a PC, you
would never get a chance to play this move.


RL


[Event "London 1991"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1991.01.01"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Plaskett"]
[Black "Arkell"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r2q1rk1/pb2bppp/1pn1pn2/4N3/3P3Q/2NB4/PP3PPP/R1B2RK1 w - - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "2"]


1. Bg5 Nxe5 (1... h6 2. Bxf6 Bxf6 3. Qe4 g6 4. Nxg6 fxg6 5. Qxg6+ Bg7
6. Qh7+
Kf7 7. Bg6+ Ke7 (7... Kf6 8. Ne4+ Ke7 9. Qxg7+ Rf7 10. Qxf7#) 8.
Qxg7+) (1...
g6 2. Ba6) *


* One presumes Plaskett thought that after 1. Bg5 Nxe5 2. Bxf6 Nxd3 3.
Bxe7 Qc7 4. Bxf8 Rxf8, White is winning, since he's up rook for
bishop. Perhaps he did not analyze far enough to see that Black will
probably win either the b- or d-pawn and have other compensation,
making the theoretical win problematical.


Right. Or he didn't even see 1. Bg5. A sloppy book full of
mistakes...Mr. Winter would have a field day, as he is a stickler for
accuracy. But does Winter point out mistakes in analysis, or just
historical mistakes made by authors? Seems more like the latter, the
few times I've read him.

RL
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Old June 11th 10, 10:06 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,256
Default Find the best move..fails to find the best defense

On Jun 11, 5:01*pm, raylopez99 wrote:
On Jun 11, 4:46*pm, Taylor Kingston
wrote:





On Jun 11, 6:12*am, raylopez99 wrote:


Another position from the far too easy book "Can you be a tactical
genius?" by James Plaskett, problem Test 2, Puzzle 8.


The bishop was on Bc1, and the best move is indeed Bg5, which I found
and many players would find, but the only moves Plaskett considers, g6
and h6, are not the best move, which is Nxe5. *Another example of why
playing (and beating) your computer is hard. *BTW in response to g6
you should play Ba6! which is striking. *But again, against a PC, you
would never get a chance to play this move.


RL


[Event "London 1991"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1991.01.01"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Plaskett"]
[Black "Arkell"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r2q1rk1/pb2bppp/1pn1pn2/4N3/3P3Q/2NB4/PP3PPP/R1B2RK1 w - - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "2"]


1. Bg5 Nxe5 (1... h6 2. Bxf6 Bxf6 3. Qe4 g6 4. Nxg6 fxg6 5. Qxg6+ Bg7
6. Qh7+
Kf7 7. Bg6+ Ke7 (7... Kf6 8. Ne4+ Ke7 9. Qxg7+ Rf7 10. Qxf7#) 8.
Qxg7+) (1...
g6 2. Ba6) *


* One presumes Plaskett thought that after 1. Bg5 Nxe5 2. Bxf6 Nxd3 3..
Bxe7 Qc7 4. Bxf8 Rxf8, White is winning, since he's up rook for
bishop. Perhaps he did not analyze far enough to see that Black will
probably win either the b- or d-pawn and have other compensation,
making the theoretical win problematical.


Right. *Or he didn't even see 1. Bg5.


I presume you mean he didn't see 1...Nxe5, since he actually did
play (or at least recommend) 1.Bg5.

*A sloppy book full of
mistakes...Mr. Winter would have a field day, as he is a stickler for
accuracy. *But does Winter point out mistakes in analysis, or just
historical mistakes made by authors? *Seems more like the latter, the
few times I've read him.


He does both, but he is far more interested in historical accuracy.
This is not something he'd give much if any attention.
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Old June 11th 10, 10:15 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,536
Default Find the best move..fails to find the best defense

On Jun 12, 12:06*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Jun 11, 5:01*pm, raylopez99 wrote:



On Jun 11, 4:46*pm, Taylor Kingston
wrote:


On Jun 11, 6:12*am, raylopez99 wrote:


Another position from the far too easy book "Can you be a tactical
genius?" by James Plaskett, problem Test 2, Puzzle 8.


The bishop was on Bc1, and the best move is indeed Bg5, which I found
and many players would find, but the only moves Plaskett considers, g6
and h6, are not the best move, which is Nxe5. *Another example of why
playing (and beating) your computer is hard. *BTW in response to g6
you should play Ba6! which is striking. *But again, against a PC, you
would never get a chance to play this move.


RL


[Event "London 1991"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1991.01.01"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Plaskett"]
[Black "Arkell"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r2q1rk1/pb2bppp/1pn1pn2/4N3/3P3Q/2NB4/PP3PPP/R1B2RK1 w - - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "2"]


1. Bg5 Nxe5 (1... h6 2. Bxf6 Bxf6 3. Qe4 g6 4. Nxg6 fxg6 5. Qxg6+ Bg7
6. Qh7+
Kf7 7. Bg6+ Ke7 (7... Kf6 8. Ne4+ Ke7 9. Qxg7+ Rf7 10. Qxf7#) 8.
Qxg7+) (1...
g6 2. Ba6) *


* One presumes Plaskett thought that after 1. Bg5 Nxe5 2. Bxf6 Nxd3 3.
Bxe7 Qc7 4. Bxf8 Rxf8, White is winning, since he's up rook for
bishop. Perhaps he did not analyze far enough to see that Black will
probably win either the b- or d-pawn and have other compensation,
making the theoretical win problematical.


Right. *Or he didn't even see 1. Bg5.


* I presume you mean he didn't see 1...Nxe5, since he actually did
play (or at least recommend) 1.Bg5.


Right, I meant that. I played though 1...Nxe5 and like you say White
loses a pawn but remains about +1.5 ahead; still he should have
mentioned this line.


*A sloppy book full of
mistakes...Mr. Winter would have a field day, as he is a stickler for
accuracy. *But does Winter point out mistakes in analysis, or just
historical mistakes made by authors? *Seems more like the latter, the
few times I've read him.


* He does both, but he is far more interested in historical accuracy.
This is not something he'd give much if any attention.


I found out when I bought a Novag VIP or some such handheld that chess
books were full of mistakes---this was about nearly 20 years ago. To
date, only Nunn mentioned this, as well as (indirectly) the Australian
master Purdy, who would always point out every position should be
looked at with a fresh pair of eyes, since in chess things can change
dramatically from move to move. Purdy was good at pointing this out,
but most chess writers (at least for beginners) give the impression
that one side or another steamrolled thematically over their opponent.

It's midnight and therefore dinner time...ah, I love Europe. In Spain
most people have dinner around midnight I once read, especially on
weekends.

Tomorrow the market for lemons...and other things.

RL



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Old June 11th 10, 11:07 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 3,026
Default Find the best move..fails to find the best defense

THE PRE-COMPUTER AGE

I found out when I bought a Novag VIP or some such handheld that
chess
books were full of mistakes---this was about nearly 20 years ago. --
RL

A lot of analysis published in the pre-computer age is rubbish. For
the most part Alekhine’s work stands the test of time, yet there is
the odd glitch. In his excellent tournament book of New York 1924 the
great man stumbles when annotating Reti-Tartakower after 1 Nf3 g6 2 e4
c5 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 d6 7 Be2 Bg7 7 0-0 Nc6 8 Be3. Alekhine
writes: "More cautious is 8 h3, for now Black can play ...Ng4." But
this simply costs a piece by 9 Bxg4 Bxg4 10 Nxc6 Bxd1 11 Nxd8 Bxc2 12
Nxb7, etc.

A bad move is a bad move whether it’s suggested by a world champion or
a duffer. Nothing can be accepted on blind faith.

NEW IDEAS IN CHESS by GM Larry Evans

raylopez99 wrote:
On Jun 12, 12:06 am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Jun 11, 5:01 pm, raylopez99 wrote:



On Jun 11, 4:46 pm, Taylor Kingston
wrote:


On Jun 11, 6:12 am, raylopez99 wrote:


Another position from the far too easy book "Can you be a tactical
genius?" by James Plaskett, problem Test 2, Puzzle 8.


The bishop was on Bc1, and the best move is indeed Bg5, which I found
and many players would find, but the only moves Plaskett considers, g6
and h6, are not the best move, which is Nxe5. Another example of why
playing (and beating) your computer is hard. BTW in response to g6
you should play Ba6! which is striking. But again, against a PC, you
would never get a chance to play this move.


RL


[Event "London 1991"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1991.01.01"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Plaskett"]
[Black "Arkell"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r2q1rk1/pb2bppp/1pn1pn2/4N3/3P3Q/2NB4/PP3PPP/R1B2RK1 w - - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "2"]


1. Bg5 Nxe5 (1... h6 2. Bxf6 Bxf6 3. Qe4 g6 4. Nxg6 fxg6 5. Qxg6+ Bg7
6. Qh7+
Kf7 7. Bg6+ Ke7 (7... Kf6 8. Ne4+ Ke7 9. Qxg7+ Rf7 10. Qxf7#) 8.
Qxg7+) (1...
g6 2. Ba6) *


One presumes Plaskett thought that after 1. Bg5 Nxe5 2. Bxf6 Nxd3 3.
Bxe7 Qc7 4. Bxf8 Rxf8, White is winning, since he's up rook for
bishop. Perhaps he did not analyze far enough to see that Black will
probably win either the b- or d-pawn and have other compensation,
making the theoretical win problematical.


Right. Or he didn't even see 1. Bg5.


I presume you mean he didn't see 1...Nxe5, since he actually did
play (or at least recommend) 1.Bg5.


Right, I meant that. I played though 1...Nxe5 and like you say White
loses a pawn but remains about +1.5 ahead; still he should have
mentioned this line.


A sloppy book full of
mistakes...Mr. Winter would have a field day, as he is a stickler for
accuracy. But does Winter point out mistakes in analysis, or just
historical mistakes made by authors? Seems more like the latter, the
few times I've read him.


He does both, but he is far more interested in historical accuracy.
This is not something he'd give much if any attention.


I found out when I bought a Novag VIP or some such handheld that chess
books were full of mistakes---this was about nearly 20 years ago. To
date, only Nunn mentioned this, as well as (indirectly) the Australian
master Purdy, who would always point out every position should be
looked at with a fresh pair of eyes, since in chess things can change
dramatically from move to move. Purdy was good at pointing this out,
but most chess writers (at least for beginners) give the impression
that one side or another steamrolled thematically over their opponent.

It's midnight and therefore dinner time...ah, I love Europe. In Spain
most people have dinner around midnight I once read, especially on
weekends.

Tomorrow the market for lemons...and other things.

RL

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